Un chien andalou
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Un Chien Andalou (1929) More at IMDbPro »Un chien andalou (original title)


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1-20 of 32 items from 2012   « Prev | Next »


Watch: Salvador Dali's Animated Disney Short 'Destino'

19 November 2012 1:29 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Though his work in the film world was brief, surrealist painter Salvador Dali left quite the impression. As we outlined in our recent feature on Alfred Hitchcock's "Spellbound," he was hired by the master of suspense to create a dream sequence that wound up being ruthlessly cut by producer David O. Selznick (though what remains is still pretty dazzling). And he's also credited as the co-creator of Luis Buñuel's still hair-raising "Un Chien Andalou" (he also teamed with the filmmaker on "L'Age Dor"). But his most compelling credit may be with one of the all time animation greats. In 1945, Dali began work on an animated project for Walt Disney, creating a number of storyboards, before financial woes put the project on hold. Fast foward to 1999, and Roy E. Disney brought it back to life, with French animator Dominique Monfréy tackling the project based on the original storyboards. The result? »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Forty 1940s Films: ‘Spellbound’

14 November 2012 10:08 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Spellbound

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Starring Ingrid Bergman, Gregory Peck, and Michael Chekhov

USA, 111 min – 1945.

Famous (among other things) for being one of the first Hollywood films to deal with psychoanalysis, Alfred Hitchcock’s Spellbound is the perfect blend of classic Hollywood romantic-murder-drama and Freud’s theories. The film is not so utterly in love with its psychology that most audiences would be drawn away from its messages. On the other hand, Spellbound is also not so fixated on plot that it forgets the characters’ psychiatric professions.

The film begins at Green Manors, a mental institution, where Dr. Constance Petersen (Bergman) is at the start, of what she hopes will be, a long career as a psychoanalyst. Dr. Petersen has no time for love and believes that science explains all of nature’s mysteries. This changes, when a new doctor (Gregory Peck) arrives at Green Manors and catches her eye. »

- Ricky

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Vamps | Review

30 October 2012 10:25 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Girls Just Wanna Have Blood: Heckerling’s Vampire Comedy a Light Bite

Director Amy Heckerling reunites with her Clueless (1995) star for a female vampire buddy comedy, Vamps, her first effort since 2007’s I Could Never Be Your Woman. Granted a limited theatrical release to be followed quickly with a Blu-ray drop date only weeks later, the film is actually getting a heavier promotional push than her last, which went straight to DVD in the Us market. There’s certainly nothing edgy about her vampire rom-com, and neither does it revamp the genre or the careers of cast and crew, and was perhaps unwisely made during a frenzied adolescent vampire craze that’s finally on the wane. What it does feature are two likeable, cutesy lead ladies and a bevy of supporting performers threaded throughout its breezy running time, unfortunately hampered by several instances of terrible CGI that should have been excised altogether. »

- Nicholas Bell

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100 + Greatest Horror Movies (pt.6) 25-1

27 October 2012 8:59 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

 

Throughout the month of October, Editor-in-Chief and resident Horror expert Ricky D, will be posting a list of his favorite Horror films of all time. The list will be posted in six parts. Click here to see every entry.

As with all lists, this is personal and nobody will agree with every choice – and if you do, that would be incredibly disturbing. It was almost impossible for me to rank them in order, but I tried and eventually gave up.

****

Special Mention:

Shock Corridor

Directed by Samuel Fuller

Written by Samuel Fuller

1963, USA

Shock Corridor stars Peter Breck as Johnny Barrett, an ambitious reporter who wants to expose the killer at the local insane asylum. In order to solve the case, he must pretend to be insane so they have him committed. Once in the asylum, Barrett sets to work, interrogating the other patients and keeping a close eye on the staff. »

- Ricky

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The Big Screen by David Thomson – review

12 October 2012 4:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

John Banville is swept away by passionate love letters to cinema

First things first. This is a very good book indeed, probably the best overview of the cinema ever written. It sparkles with insight, is packed with anecdote, and pulses with passion for the medium that Thomson has been attending to, worrying at and writing about all his life.

Although it may not be an entirely original insight, Thomson again and again presses his case that the attraction of movies is that they play with and on our dreams and deepest yearnings. People go to the cinema, he writes, to sit in the dark "beholding an orgy of their own desires burning on the screen", yet, paradoxically, the net effect can be a deadening of the spirit. Hence his book is not only a paean to "the pictures", as we used to call them, but also an expression of anxiety »

- John Banville

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8 Gruesome Movie Scenes That Made Audiences Sick

11 October 2012 11:00 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Luis Bunuel once claimed that he kept rocks in his pockets during the first screening of Un Chien Andalou in case the crowd didn’t like what it saw. Whether or not that’s actually true, the audience reaction was never so bad that it came to violence. Apparently cutting open an eyeball wasn’t a real biggie in the 1920s. Of course, none of that changes how ridiculously hard that short film is to watch. It’s grotesque, nauseating, and a great starting point for decades of filmmakers continuing to make audiences freak the hell out. That grand tradition was continued with a second fainting at a screening of V/H/S and it’s a tradition we’d like to celebrate with 8 movies that caused some strong physical reactions. 8. Psycho Kind of obligatory, but also surprisingly unconfirmed for the most part. There has always been a standing assumption that the shower scene caused a big »

- David Christopher Bell

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Eric Hobsbawm changed how we think about culture

2 October 2012 4:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Marxist historian reclaimed and popularised the value of popular culture – something so integral to our lives today it seems bizarre it was ever denigrated

The historian Eric Hobsbawm, who has died aged 95, is rightly being mourned as a great intellectual of modern times. Yet Hobsbawm was more than a powerful historian and political thinker; nor should he be remembered in solitary splendour. He was part of a group of British Marxist scholars who profoundly influenced our understanding of what culture is.

More than 50 years ago, a bunch of dissident Oxbridge-educated academic historians changed the way the British saw culture. They understood, long before anyone else, that culture is what shapes the world. They also saw that culture is totally democratic and comes from the people. While the official guardians of the arts, such as Kenneth Clark, were praising the "civilisation" of the elite on television and in print, Hobsbawm »

- Jonathan Jones

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Fab furore: Is it time to re-evaluate the Beatles' Magical Mystery Tour?

26 September 2012 2:59 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The Beatles film Magical Mystery Tour caused outrage in 1967 – and is now being compared to Buñuel and the Pythons. John Harris hears the true story of the shoot from those involved

On Monday 11 September 1967, two hours later than scheduled, a coach pulled out of Allsop Place, just behind Baker Street tube station. Filling 40 of its 43 seats were actors, technicians and camera operators – along with Paul McCartney, and a crowd of friends and associates of the Beatles. John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr were soon picked up near their commuter-belt homes in Surrey – whereupon the coach headed for an inconclusive and ill-starred trek around the West Country, ending in the less-than-glamorous environs of Newquay in Cornwall.

Just over three months later, after further filming at a Kent airfield, BBC1 screened the hour-long film the Beatles titled Magical Mystery Tour. It went out on Boxing Day at 8.35pm and 15 million people tuned in – but, »

- John Harris

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Fab furore: Is it time to re-evaluate the Beatles' Magical Mystery Tour?

26 September 2012 2:59 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Beatles film Magical Mystery Tour caused outrage in 1967 – and is now being compared to Buñuel and the Pythons. John Harris hears the true story of the shoot from those involved

On Monday 11 September 1967, two hours later than scheduled, a coach pulled out of Allsop Place, just behind Baker Street tube station. Filling 40 of its 43 seats were actors, technicians and camera operators – along with Paul McCartney, and a crowd of friends and associates of the Beatles. John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr were soon picked up near their commuter-belt homes in Surrey – whereupon the coach headed for an inconclusive and ill-starred trek around the West Country, ending in the less-than-glamorous environs of Newquay in Cornwall.

Just over three months later, after further filming at a Kent airfield, BBC1 screened the hour-long film the Beatles titled Magical Mystery Tour. It went out on Boxing Day at 8.35pm and 15 million people tuned in – but, »

- John Harris

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Sound On Sight’s Best Films Ever Made

22 August 2012 9:16 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

With the notion of film canonization once again at issue, we thought it might be an appropriate occasion to check in on our staff’s collective opinion of the greatest films of all time. We had no idea what to expect; our contributors come from all over the world and come from vastly different backgrounds and occupations. The results were, appropriately, eclectic, ranging from acknowledged cornerstones to contemporary classics.

A few facts worth throwing in: with five films appearing, Orson Welles is the most frequently-cited director, followed by Stanley Kubrick, Alfred Hitchcock and Akira Kurosawa; the newest film to merit an appearance was Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds; animated films made a dent, particularly Toy Story and Snow White;  several shorts managed to find their way in, as well.

The list, along with some individual writers’ thoughts on the entries that make up the Top 10, follow including special mention of »

- Ricky

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The Sight & Sound Top 250 Films

17 August 2012 7:37 PM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

After much media hoopla about "Vertigo" toppling "Citizen Kane" in its poll, Sight and Sound magazine have now released the full version of its once a decade 'Top 250 greatest films of all time' poll results via its website. The site also includes full on links showcasing Top Tens of the hundreds of film industry professionals who participated in the project.

For those who don't want to bother with the individual lists and to save you a bunch of clicking, below is a copy of the full 250 films that made the lists and how many votes they got to be considered for their positions:

1 - Vertigo (Hitchcock, 1958) [191 votes]

2 - Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941) [157 votes]

3 - Tokyo Story (Ozu, 1953) [107 votes]

4 - La Règle du jeu (Renoir, 1939) [100 votes]

5 - Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans (Murnau, 1927) [93 votes]

6 - 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968) [90 votes]

7 - The Searchers (Ford, 1956) [78 votes]

8 - Man with a Movie Camera (Vertov, 1929) [68 votes]

9 - The Passion of Joan of Arc (Dreyer, »

- Garth Franklin

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Sight and Sound, Mary and Max, and the Absence of Animation in the recent Top Tens

9 August 2012 5:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

A musing on the absence of animation from the Sight and Sound poll and a shameless attempt to shed light on a neglected gem from the genre.

The Sight and Sound poll is out and the dust has settled. A nun has sent Orson Welles plummeting from the top spot and a new film reigns supreme (Vertigo, not Sister Act). Almost everything that could be said has been said (Fall of Kane! Rise of Hitch! No Michael Bay?) but the poll was just as notable for it’s omissions as it was for the Top Ten.

Alongside the sharp pang I felt just above the left kidney when seeing the lack of Woody Allen in the top 50, another notable presence missing was that of animation. Just as Jim Emerson has noted the lack of funny in the list at his Scanners blog and Nick Goundry has used this very site »

- Billy Langsworthy

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Underground Film Links: June 24, 2012

24 June 2012 10:57 AM, PDT | Underground Film Journal | See recent Underground Film Journal news »

Today’s Must Read is a fantastic sneak peek inside the Film-Makers’ Coop archives on the Capital New York website. Learn about the more oddball artifacts it keeps, the efforts to preserve older films and more. The only thing I object to is Coop executive director M.M. Serra flatly stating that experimental film is not “entertainment.” Yeah, I understand the need to differentiate experimental film from mainstream film, but experimental film is Highly entertaining! It’s just “entertaining” in different ways than plot-driven film is. Watching an experimental film is not a downer of an intellectual experience. It’s fun! Can we all start saying this from now on: Experimental film is fun!Rick Trembles tackles Ridley Scott’s Prometheus for Motion Picture Purgatory. Sadly, the Montreal Mirror, the alt-weekly in which Rick’s strip appeared for well over a decade went under last week.Donna k. also reviews Prometheus. »

- Mike Everleth

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From The Arthouse to The Slaughterhouse: ‘Un Chien Andalou’

7 May 2012 7:38 AM, PDT | Destroy the Brain | See recent Destroy the Brain news »

“From The Arthouse to The Slaughterhouse” is a new column that will take a look at the films that have impacted the history of cinema by blurring the line between the beautiful and the grotesque; the thoughtful and the bizarre; the artistic and the horrific.  Not content with settling for a straightforward approach to either the arthouse or horror genre, these films defy the standards of “talky” arthouse films and “B movie” shocks and find a way to bridge the gap between the two categories.  It’s a look into the films that oppose explanation, interpretation, and reasoning.  Yet for some reason, they stick in the minds of both scholars and horror fans alike long after the final reel.

The 1929 silent film, Un Chien Andalou (The Andalusian Dog), is the first film we will be taking a look at.  Nothing seems more appropriate to say the least.  At a time »

- Michael Haffner

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Movies This Week: May 4-11, 2012

4 May 2012 12:00 PM, PDT | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

 

Discriminating filmgoers in Austin will be pleased to find that this week offers plenty of choices, a surprising number of which do not involve Joss Whedon.

The best retro offering of the week is the exquisite, digitally restored Yellow Submarine, playing nightly May 8-13 at various Alamo Drafthouse locations. Based on the seminal Beatles hit, animated in a vibrant oh-so-Sixties style and released when Joss Whedon was only 4, Yellow Submarine (pictured above) is a landmark film that stands the test of time. If you love Sixties pop culture, you'll love this movie. (And if you're too young to remember Sixties pop culture, watch Yellow Submarine and learn. Your life will be so much the better for hearing "Eleanor Rigby.")

In the mood for something trippy but not so psychedelic? On Monday the Austin Film Society and Justine's Brasserie are presenting L'Age d'Or, proto-tripster Luis Buñuel's 1930 follow-up to his masterpiece Un chien andalou (yes, »

- Don Clinchy

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Amos Vogel, 1921 - 2012

26 April 2012 1:42 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Amos Vogel, founder of the legendary ciné-club Cinema 16, co-founder of the New York Film Festival and author of Film as a Subversive Art (1974), has died in New York, having turned 91 just a week ago today.

In 1938, "Vogel fled Nazi Austria for Israel, intending New York as a pit stop on the way," wrote Sam Adams in the Philadelphia City Paper in 2004. "But Vogel, an avowed socialist, became disillusioned with Zionism and elected to stay in Manhattan. A voracious polymath, Vogel became aware of a wave of postwar cinema seeking to grapple with the world's new uncertainties, filmmakers who rejected narrative and simple cause and effect for a more personal, idiosyncratic method that defied category altogether. He also knew that New York, and the Us as a whole, lacked a regular venue where such films could be seen. So in 1947, Vogel, emulating the Vienna film societies of his youth, founded Cinema »

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A Fantastic Fear Of Everything and Transit: Trailers To Die For

9 April 2012 12:04 PM, PDT | Boomtron | See recent Boomtron news »

Two trailers for tantalizing crime film hit the internets this weekend. Both put hooks in me. One of them hauls hard enough on the line to haul me into the theaters immediately upon its release.

These two-minute bits of buzz are the Transit trailer and the A Fantastic Fear of Everything trailer. You can check them out below. I expect, in both cases, you’ll be glad you did.

Glad, that is, unless you don’t appreciate the kind of trailer that’ll be stapled onto your nightmares. There’s a scientifically proven 65% chance of that happening in the case of one of them.

That one in question – surprise, surprise – is the teaser for A Fantastic Fear of Everything. Simon Pegg stars in this surrealist crime-flavored dark comedy, as a deeply traumatized children’s book writer whose foray into crime fiction unleashes hordes of inner demons onto his vulnerable psyche. »

- Matthew C. Funk

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English-Language Audiences Will Get ‘Livid’ With Remake of French Horror Film

7 April 2012 12:49 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

France may not be the first country that comes to mind when it comes to horror cinema. But the place that brought us Truffaut, Godard and an inexplicable appreciation for Jerry Lewis has made a name for itself in the last decade when it comes to defining the genre. Films like the twisty High Tension, the zombified Horde and the exceptionally creepy Them gave Hollywood a reason to stand up and take notice – and, of course, take some of the ideas for themselves.

Recently, it was announced that French distributor Snd Films will oversee an English-language remake of the 2011 creeper Livid. Originally directed by Julien Maury and Alexandre Bustillo (Inside), the film, which is described as a “dark romantic fairy tale,” will be adapted by screenwriter David Birke. Appropriately, Doug Davison, one of the people who brought The Strangers, the successful remake of Them, to theaters, will produce, along with Robert Léger. »

- jpraup@gmail.com (thefilmstage.com)

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Blu-ray Review: ‘Spellbound’

4 April 2012 10:51 PM, PDT | Destroy the Brain | See recent Destroy the Brain news »

Spellbound is the second Alfred Hitchcock film we are looking at this week.  MGM has released three of the director’s acclaimed films on Blu-ray.  Spellbound is a slight departure from 1941′s Rebecca - the previous film we just looked at – even though they share many similarities as well.  Aside from existing as early examples of the talented director’s career, both films focus on an out of the ordinary relationship between two seemingly normal individuals.  In both cases you deal with characters whose mental state is being torn apart due to memories of their past.  It’s an interesting comparison though I feel Spellbound explores this idea in more intriguing ways.  Obviously in much more direct ways as well.  Hitchcock’s foray into psychoanalysis is a complex film that needs to really be studied to fully appreciate its intricacies.  Join me as we take a look into its mind. »

- Michael Haffner

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‘Blood for Poppies’ Video: Garbage Watched a Few Old Movies While They Were Gone

4 April 2012 7:30 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Even if you do not spend your free hours in the campus film archives watching old surrealist movies while wearing a beret, you may recognize the Un Chien Andalou–inspired scene in Garbage's "Blood for Poppies" video. It's the one where Shirley Manson's eyeball gets sliced like that old cow. The other references in "Blood for Poppies" are a little trickier, and Vulture won't presume to be able to I.D. them all (though we did think we saw a little Méliès in there, but maybe that's the Hugo talking). But the eyeball thing definitely happens! And it is very clear that Garbage spent the last however many years they've been on hiatus doing their Serious Movie homework. E for effort, guys.  »

- Amanda Dobbins

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