Diary of a Lost Girl (1929) - News Poster

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Beggars of Life

A happy discovery! This is a major late- silent-era gem on the order of Von Sternberg’s Docks of New York — a special treat that will please fans of director William Wellman — he revisited parts of it in a later talkie. It’s also a key movie in our education/adoration of the maverick actress Louise Brooks, the erotic sensation too hot and too independent for Hollywood.

Beggars of Life

Blu-ray

Kino Classics

1928 / B&W / 1:33 Silent Aperture / 81 min. / Street Date August 22, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Wallace Beery, Richard Arlen, Louise Brooks, Blue Washington, Roscoe Karns, Robert Perry, Guinn ‘Bog Boy’ Williams.

Cinematography: Henry Gerrard

Film Editor: Alyson Shaffer

Assistant Director: Charles Barton

Music: The Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra

Written by Jim Tully and Benjamin Glazer from a novel by Jim Tully

Produced by Jesse L. Lasky, Adolph Zukor, William A. Wellman

Directed by William A. Wellman

Director
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Haley Lu Richardson Joins Elizabeth McGovern’s PBS Movie ‘The Chaperone’

Haley Lu Richardson Joins Elizabeth McGovern’s PBS Movie ‘The Chaperone’
Split” star Haley Lu Richardson has joined Elizabeth McGovern in on the period drama “The Chaperone” — the first film from PBS Masterpiece.

Principal photography has started, producers announced Tuesday. “The Chaperone,” based on Laura Moriarty’s best-selling novel, is scripted by Julian Fellowes, directed by Michael Engler, and will air on PBS stations nationwide after its initial theatrical run.

McGovern, who is also a producer, optioned the novel and worked with Fellowes to adapt it for the big screen. McGovern portrays a woman whose life is changed forever when she chaperones a young and soon to be famous Louise Brooks — played by Richardson — to New York in the early 1920s.

Brooks, an icon of the 1920s for popularizing the bob haircut, would go on to star in 25 films, including “Pandora’s Box,” “Diary of a Lost Girl,” and “Miss Europe” before retiring in 1938.

Other cast members include Victoria Hill, Campbell Scott (“House of Cards”), Geza Rohrig, Blythe Danner
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Giveaway – Win Westfront 1918 & Kameradschaft

Eureka Entertainment is set to release Westfront 1918 & Kameradschaft (two films by G.W. Pabst), two Anti-War films from master director Georg Wilhelm Pabst at the height of his powers, as part of The Masters of Cinema Series in a Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) edition on July 24th, and we’ve got three copies to give away. Read on for details of how to enter…

Georg Wilhelm Pabst (Pandora’s Box, Diary of a Lost Girl) made a flawless transition from silent to sound filmmaking with, Westfront 1918 and Kameradschaft, a pair of strongly anti-war titles (Pabst himself was a prisoner of war for the duration of Wwi) that combined elements of Expressionism and New Objectivity to stunning effect.

In Westfront 1918, four infantrymen on the Western Front suffer the everyday hardships and insanity of trench warfare, and in Kameradschaft, a team of German miners risk their lives to rescue a
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

i've got good news. that link you like is going to come back in style.

• Guardian Great interview with Holly Hunter about The Big Sick and her career. (People are already mentioning "Oscar nom!" in regards to her supporting work as Zoe Kazan's mother in the romantic comedy)

• Pajiba on what the new Defenders posters might remind you of

• Playbill Adorable John Benjamin Hickey, fresh off the revival of Six Degrees of Separation, thinks there should be a fine for people who leave their cel phones on in theaters. Agreed!

• Screen Crush picks the 25 best Lgbt films of the past 25 years. Happy to see Pariah and Bound mixed in with the usual titles like Brokeback Mountain and such. And the past few years have been so good for Lgbt cinema. I mean: Carol, The Handmaiden, Moonlight, Tangerine. #Blessed

• Esquire Fun article by Tyler Coates on how he finally learned to love RuPaul's Drag Race which he had avoided for years and even bad-mouthed in print

• Theater Mania you don't see this often but there's an actual age restriction on the Broadway adaptation of George Orwell's "1984". No one under 13 will be admitted due to its intensity. The show stars Tom Sturridge, Reed Birney, Olivia Wilde, and Tfe fav Cara Seymour (who previously did that lovely guest spot for us). I'm seeing it soon so will report back.

• IndieWire has issues with the "orientalism" of the new Twin Peaks. Add this to the onling Sofia Coppola controversy and... well... People I don't know what to do with all the outrage anymore at everything. There's got to be a line where, as an adult, you're just okay with what you're seeing and discarding the parts that irk you, or filing them under "I don't know about that but whatever" if they're not harmfully intended. Artists will always have their own peculiar obsessions and they'll always draw from a wide variety of influences (at least the good ones will) to craft their own stories and nobody really owns history; pop culture and the arts are giant beautiful melting pots of ideas and aesthetics from all over the world. Oh and also the Laura Dern hairstyle is not proprietarily Asian as the article seems to imply. I know this because I was obsessed with silent film star Louise Brooks as a teenager (Pandora's Box & Diary of a Lost Girl 4ever!). It was originally called the 'Castle Bob,' because Irene Castle (a famous NY dancer) debuted the then-shocking look in 1915. It was a very controversial look but became a sensation in the 1920s with flappers and silent film stars. Hollywood's first popular Asian American actress Anna May Wong, who the article references as an influence on Dern's look, actually had to get her hair cut like that because it was so popular.

• This is Not Porn great photo of Oscar winner Kim Hunter in makeup chair on The Planet of the Apes (1968)

Hilarious Reads and I Personally Needed the Laughs. You?

• The New Yorker "Tennessee Williams with Air Conditioning"... *fans self* I was cackling so loud by the end of this. Best article in forever.

• McSweeneys "11 Ways That I, a White Man, Am Not Privileged" Oops. Hee!

• Buzzfeed "25 Gay Pride signs that will make you laugh harder than you should" - so many of these are so wonderful I just want to hug all gay people for being funny and able to spell

• McSweeneys "An Oral History of Quentin Tarantino as Told to Me By Men I've Dated"

What places are delivering right now? So, in the early ’90s, right around when Pulp Fiction came out, Quentin Tarantino and Mira Sorvino were dating. I always thought Romy and Michelle’s High School Reunion was a dumb chick flick, but I caught part of it on cable the other day and there was an ad for Red Apple cigarettes in the background of one of the shots! Do you know about Red Apple cigarettes?
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Downton Abbey’ Creator, Star Elizabeth McGovern to Reteam for PBS Movie ‘The Chaperone’

‘Downton Abbey’ Creator, Star Elizabeth McGovern to Reteam for PBS Movie ‘The Chaperone’
Downton Abbey” star Elizabeth McGovern is re-teaming with series creator Julian Fellowes on the period drama “The Chaperone” — PBS and Masterpiece’s first feature film.

Arclight Films is financing and introducing the movie to buyers at the Cannes Film Festival, which launches on Wednesday.

The Chaperone,” based on Laura Moriarty’s best-selling novel, will be scripted by Fellowes, directed by Michael Engler, and star McGovern. It will air on PBS stations nationwide after its initial theatrical run.

Related

Downton Abbey’ Star Hugh Bonneville to Play Roald Dahl in Biopic (Exclusive)

McGovern will play a Kansas woman whose life is forever changed in the early 1920s when she chaperones Louise Brooks, a beautiful and talented 15-year-old dancer (played by Julia Goldani Telles), to New York for the summer. Brooks, an icon of the 1920s for popularizing the bob haircut, would go on to star in 25 films, including “Pandora’s Box,” “Diary of a Lost Girl,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Story of Sin

There’s plenty of Sin in Walerian Boroczyk’s searing movie, but little of it can be laid at the feet of its heroine, no matter what terrible crimes she commits. In pre-WW1 Poland, the innocent Ewa’s tragedy is to fall hopelessly in love, without restraint; Boroczyk’s camera doesn’t flinch as the hapless Ewa falls from grace. Amour fou has been crazier than this, but rarely as destructive. Artistically this show is flawless, and in terms of sex politics it’s a scream of protest.

Story of Sin

Blu-ray + DVD

Arrow Academy USA

1975 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 130 min. / Dzieje grzechu / Street Date March 28, 2017 / Available from Arrow Video / 39.95

Starring: Grazyna Dlugolecka, Jerzy Zelnik, Olgierd Lukaszewicz, Roman Wilhelmi, Marek Walczewski, Karolina Lubienska, Zdzislaw Mrozewski, Mieczyslaw Voit, Marek Bargielowski.

Cinematography: Zygmunt Samosiuk

Film Editor: Lidia Pacewicz

Written by Walerian Borowczyk from the novel by Stefan Zeromski

Directed by Walerian Borowczyk

Walerian Borowczyk
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Masters of Cinema Cast – Episode 55 – Vampyr

Joakim is joined by Adam Gonet from The Art Shelf to discuss this spooky classic. Enjoy.

From Masters of Cinema:

The first sound-film by one of the greatest of all filmmakers, Vampyr offers a sensual immediacy that few, if any, works of cinema can claim to match. Legendary director Carl Theodor Dreyer leads the viewer, as though guided in a trance, through a realm akin to a waking-dream, a zone positioned somewhere between reality and the supernatural.

Traveller Allan Gray (arrestingly depicted by Julian West, aka the secretive real-life Baron Nicolas de Gunzburg) arrives at a countryside inn seemingly beckoned by haunted forces. His growing acquaintance with the family who reside there soon opens up a network of uncanny associations between the dead and the living, of ghostly lore and demonology, which pull Gray ever deeper into an unsettling, and upsetting, mystery. At its core: troubled Gisèle, chaste daughter and sexual incarnation,
See full article at CriterionCast »

New to Streaming: ‘Green Room,’ Albert Brooks, ‘Cemetery of Splendor,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit the interwebs. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Films of Albert Brooks

We can think of no better way to celebrate the holiday weekend then curling up with the hilarious, often touching films of Albert Brooks. All of his directorial features — Real Life, Modern Romance, Lost in America, Defending Your Life, Mother, The Muse, and Looking For Comedy in a Muslim World — have now been added to Netflix. What are you waiting for?
See full article at The Film Stage »

Scott Reviews The Rainer Werner Fassbinder Collection [Arrow Video Blu-ray Review]

It’s no real secret that we’re reaching a tipping point with home video. Streaming is proving a better and better option for the casual consumer every day, and even the cinephile dollar, which has rather successfully driven home video decisions for the past couple of years, has such services as Hulu, Fandor, Mubi, and – soon – FilmStruck vying for their attention. Physical distributors have subsequently doubled down on their most successful and acclaimed models. Criterion is going big on new-to-disc, big international titles with new restorations (Brighter Summer Day, Paris Belongs to Us, A Touch of Zen) and lavish new editions of American classics (The New World, Dr. Strangelove). Kino is investing in silent classics (Fantomas, The Phantom of the Opera, Diary of a Lost Girl) while diversifying to include more American studio titles. Masters of Cinema is going into deep specialty stuff with an Early Murnau box and Edvard Munch.
See full article at CriterionCast »

DVD Savant 2015 Favored Disc Roundup

or, Savant picks The Most Impressive Discs of 2015

This is the actual view from Savant Central, looking due North.

What a year! I was able to take one very nice trip back East too see Washington D.C. for the first time, or at least as much as two days' walking in the hot sun and then cool rain would allow. Back home in Los Angeles, we've had a year of extreme drought -- my lawn is looking patriotically ratty -- and we're expecting something called El Niño, that's supposed to be just shy of Old-Testament build-me-an-ark intensity. We withstood heat waves like those in Day the Earth Caught Fire, and now we'll get the storms part. This has been a wild year for DVD Savant, which is still a little unsettled. DVDtalk has been very patient and generous, and so have Stuart Galbraith & Joe Dante; so far everything
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

New on Video: ‘Diary of a Lost Girl’

Diary of a Lost Girl

Written by Rudolf Leonhardt

Directed by Georg Wilhelm Pabst

Germany, 1929

In just two collaborations, the German director Georg Wilhelm Pabst and the Kansas-born Louise Brooks created a screen personality that left a permanent mark on the history of film. The iconic Brooks—impeccably dressed, seductively smirking, short, jet-black hair—had been seen in films prior, most notably in Howard HawksA Girl in Every Port (1928), but it was in Pabst’s Pandora’s Box and Diary of a Lost Girl (both released in 1929) that this embodiment of tumultuous 1920s mores struck a strong and enduring chord.

Brooks in these two Pabst features could not be more dissimilar, however. Lulu, the freewheeling temptress of Pandora’s Box, is miles away from Thymian, the young, naive innocent of Diary of a Lost Girl. As this latter feature begins, Thymian enters the picture all in white, in accordance with her recent confirmation.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Off The Shelf – Episode 67 – New Home Video Releases For Tuesday, October 20th 2015

This week on Off The Shelf, Ryan is joined by Brian Saur to take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for the week of October 29th, 2015, and chat about some follow-up and home video news.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Episode Links & Notes Follow-up Iron Giant on iTunes Apple TV Wireless Headphones (recommended by Rebecca Wright at Movie Gazette Online) link John Carpenter’s Vampires low-quantity Army Of Darkness correction News Scream Factory October Sale Twilight Time January / February 2016 titles Ralph Bakshi’s Last Days Of Coney Island on Vimeo on October 29th Aladdin II & III 2-Movie Collection Blu-ray Synapse: Triumph Of The Will New Releases

October 13th

Aladdin: Diamond Edition Bates Motel: Season 3 The Brood Call Me Lucky Company Business Cry of the Hunted Dope Edward Scissorhands Escape from Alcatraz Flaxy Martin The Land Before Time Mad Men: The Final Season, Part 2 Malone (1987) Manos: The Hands of Fate
See full article at CriterionCast »

Diary of a Lost Girl

G.W. Pabst's silent German classic is intact, restored and looking great. Louise Brooks is the virginal innocent betrayed on every level of the sexual double standard. Brooks is nothing less than amazing, with a performance that doesn't date, and Pabst only has to show how things are to make a statement about societal hypocrisy. German cinema doesn't get better. Diary of a Lost Girl Blu-ray Kino Lorber Classics 1929 / B&W / 1:33 flat / 112 min. / Tagebuch einer Verlorenen / Street Date October 20, 2015 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Louise Brooks, Fritz Rasp, Valeska Gert, Franziska Kinz, Edith Meinhard, Andrews Engelmann, Kurt Gerron, Siegfried Arno, Sybille Schmitz, André Roanne. Cinematography Sepp Allgeier, Fritz Arno Wagner Art Directors Erno Metzner and Emil Hasler Original Music Javier Perez de Azpeitia (Piano) Written by Rudolf Leonhardt from the novel by Margarethe Böhme Produced by Directed by G.W. Pabst  

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The universally revered Louise Brooks
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Blu-ray Review: 'Diary of a Lost Girl'

  • CineVue
★★★★☆A new restoration of G.W. Pabst’s 1929 masterpiece Diary of a Lost Girl, demonstrates the luminosity of his iconic star, Louise Brooks, in what was their final of two legendary collaborations, the other being Pandora’s Box in the same year. Having left Paramount studios to work for the celebrated German director in 1928, Brooks had been back in the Us for six months when Pabst called upon her to again take the lead in his latest production. Like Lulu in Pandora’s Box, her character, Thymian Henning in Diary of a Lost Girl was one of questionable morality, occupying, throughout the film, positions in both ‘respectable’ and ‘sleazy’ society.
See full article at CineVue »

Sfsff Starts on Thursday with Movie Icon Brooks' Final Starring Role

Louise Brooks in Prix de Beauté: 2013 San Francisco Silent Film Festival Louise Brooks will kick off the 2013 San Francisco Silent Film Festival. At 7 p.m. on Thursday, July 17, the Sfsff will screen Augusto Genina’s Prix de Beauté aka Beauty Prize at the Castro Theater. Released in 1930 — when talkies had already become established in much of the moviemaking world — the French-made Prix de Beauté came out in both sound and silent versions, a widely common practice in those days as many theaters had yet to get wired for sound. Needless to say, the San Francisco Silent Film Festival’s Prix de Beauté print is the silent version, recently restored by the Cineteca di Bologna. (Photo: Louise Brooks in Prix de Beauté.) Prix de Beauté, which marked the last time Louise Brooks starred in a feature film, tells the story of a typist who enters a beauty contest — much to her
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

How Many of the Movies from Roger Ebert's List of Great Movies Have You Seen?

I've mentioned before how several years ago I created a list using Roger Ebert's Great Movies, Oscar Best Picture winners, IMDb's Top 250, etc. and began going through them doing my best to see as many of the films on these lists that I had not seen as I possibly could to up my film I.Q. Well, someone has gone through the exhaustive effort to take all of the films Roger Ebert wrote about in his three "Great Movies" books, all of which are compiled on his website and added them to a Letterbxd list and I've added that list below. I'm not positive every movie on his list is here, but by my count there are 363 different titles listed (more if you count the trilogies, the Up docs and Decalogue) and of those 363, I have personally seen 229 and have added an * next to those I've seen. Clearly I have some work to do,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

How Many of the Movies from Roger Ebert's List of Great Movies Have You Seen?

I've mentioned before how several years ago I created a list using Roger Ebert's Great Movies, Oscar Best Picture winners, IMDb's Top 250, etc. and began going through them doing my best to see as many of the films on these lists that I had not seen as I possibly could to up my film I.Q. Well, someone has gone through the exhaustive effort to take all of the films Roger Ebert wrote about in his three "Great Movies" books, all of which are compiled on his website and added them to a Letterbxd list and I've added that list below. I'm not positive every movie on his list is here, but by my count there are 362 different titles listed (more if you count the trilogies and Decalogue) and of those 362, I have personally seen 229 and have added an * next to those I've seen. Clearly I have some work to do,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

2012 Chicago Underground Film Festival: Official Lineup

Having been around for eighteen years, the Chicago Underground Film Festival has continually changed what it defines as “underground.”

So its 19th annual edition, which will be held on May 31 to June 7 at the Gene Siskel Film Center, feels like its most experimental edition in recent years.

While things kick off on the 31st with the Vice-produced anthology film The Fourth Dimension by Alexsei Fedorchenko, Harmony Korine and Jan Kwiecinski, the rest of the fest is packed with feature-length and short experimental work, documentaries and alternative narratives.

Some of the experimental feature highlights include the vastly prolific Robert Todd‘s Master Plan, which examines theories of modern housing from private residences to prisons; Australia’s two-person art collective Soda_Jerk’s epic rip on media piracy, Hollywood Burn; Michael Kosakowski’s compendium on murder fantasies, Zero Killing; L.A. filmmaker Daniel Martinico’s meditation on the acting process, Ok, Good
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

House at the End of the Link

Untapped New York "My Day as a Paparazzo" how New Yorkers react to celebrity sightings and how it changes when the paparazzi are involved.

Roger Ebert remembers Diary of a Lost Girl one of my very favorite silents starring Louise Brooks.

Geekscape wonders what The Avengers might have looked like had it been made in the 1980s. Michael Biehn for Steve Rogers and Cary Elwes for Tony Stark? I could deal.

Stranger Than Most names the laziest tagline ever. Oh Safe House. Try harder!

In Contention Julian Fellowes to right Cameron's wrong on Titanic. Oh dear. Fellowes has let Downton Abbey go to his head. Aint nothing wrong with Titanic (1997) that isn't so wrong it's right.

Deja View remembers an animated bit from Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)

Awards Daily new images from Woody Allen's To Rome With Love. How many title-changes has this one gone through now?

Animation Mag
See full article at FilmExperience »

Top Ten Silent Films Anyone Who Liked 'The Artist' Should See

Ten Silent Films Anyone Who Liked The Artist Should See

This year's Oscar race got serious when the Golden Globes picked their winners for Best Picture. The Globes haven't always been a good barometer for which film will actually take Best Picture but they do help films garner recognition and additional box office at a critical time of the year. This year's two winners, The Artist for Best Musical or Comedy and The Descendants for Best Drama, were already considered front-runners and although neither is considered a lock at this point, the wins at last weekend's Globes ceremony certainly didn't hurt their chances. Which brings me to a question for the audience. Is The Artist getting attention simply because it is a curiosity or is it really that good? I tend to agree with Brad's review when he suggested that "... 80 or so years ago I don't think it would have
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »
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