6.3/10
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11 user 3 critic

On with the Show! (1929)

Passed | | Musical, Romance | 13 July 1929 (USA)
A musical advertised as the first 100% natural color, all-singing production. The plot concerns a wide-eyed former hatcheck girl who takes the place of a rebellious star.

Director:

Writers:

(based on the play "Shoestring" by), (scenario)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Harold
...
Nita
...
Joe Beaton
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Kitty (as Sally O'Neill)
...
Jimmy
...
Sarah
...
Jerry
Harry Gribbon ...
Joe
...
Pete
...
Durant
Fairbanks Twins ...
Twins
...
Sam Bloom (as Purnell B. Pratt)
Thomas Jefferson ...
Dad
...
Ethel
...
Bart
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Storyline

A musical advertised as the first 100% natural color, all-singing production. The plot concerns a wide-eyed former hatcheck girl who takes the place of a rebellious star.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Musical | Romance

Certificate:

Passed
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

13 July 1929 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Comediantes  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

(Vitaphone) (Western Electric Apparatus)

Color:

(2-strip Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Film debut of John William Sublett (aka "Bubbles"). See more »

Connections

Featured in Jazz (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

Wedding Day
(1929) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Akst
Lyrics by Grant Clarke
Sung by Henry Fink, Arthur Lake, Josephine Huston, and Chorus
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User Reviews

 
Charming Transition Talkie Musical
16 October 2000 | by (Pittsburgh, PA) – See all my reviews

OK, so it's the old story about what goes on backstage in the production of a Broadway musical----even to the cliché of the star getting sick and the understudy taking her place and becoming a big star. Many critics see this as the inspiration for 42nd STREET, but this film has the period charm that only the transitional talkie musicals could have. Part of it is quite stagebound-----including musical numbers as you probably would have seen them on the Broadway stage in the 1920's, so if you don't care for very early musicals, you'd better pass on this one.

This was the film that introduced the song "Am I Blue" sung by a very young Ethel Waters, and followed by the even better "Birmingham Bertha" with black dancer John Bubbles. You should be warned that there are black dancers in the cast who wear some outrageous politically incorrect costumes---including one number where their costumes have watermelon stripes on them! And seeing Joe E. Brown as a mean comedian who constantly argues with Arthur Lake (better known as Dagwood Bumstead in the BLONDIE Series) will be something of a revelation to his fans. The film was made in the early two-strip Technicolor process, which unfortunately has yet to be found, but is still quite enjoyable in B & W. Remember, although this is a very charming transitional talkie musical, modern audiences will only see it as a horribly dated antique.


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