5.7/10
26
4 user

Oh, Yeah? (1929)

Passed | | Comedy, Drama | 19 October 1929 (USA)
A couple of roving vagabonds hitch a freight to the railroad town of Linda, and between bouts with the fright-yard bulls and other drifters, find romance in the persons of two waitresses at... See full summary »

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Writers:

(story "No Brakes"-The Saturday Evening Post), (scenario) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Dude Cowan
...
Dusty Reilly
Patricia Caron ...
Pinkie
...
The Elk
Budd Fine ...
Pop Eye (as Bud Fine)
...
Hot Foot
...
Splinters
...
Railroad-Yard Superintendent
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Storyline

A couple of roving vagabonds hitch a freight to the railroad town of Linda, and between bouts with the fright-yard bulls and other drifters, find romance in the persons of two waitresses at the camp restaurant. American-slang rules the dialogue to the point non-USA viewers need a slang-glossary to follow the dialogue. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Passed
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

19 October 1929 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

No Brakes  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Photophone System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Love Found Me
Written by Tay Garnett, George Green and George Waggner
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User Reviews

 
Hasn't Aged Well
3 January 2018 | by See all my reviews

James Gleason and Robert Armstrong are a couple of boomers -- itinerant railroad men who hop from one line to another. They wind up operating out of a switching yard in the middle of nowhere where Zasu Pitts and Patricia Caron run the commissary and pay roll and everything that doesn't require too much muscle, and they all wind up intending to settle down. When one of the workers wins big in a crap game, gets his money stolen, and beaten unconscious, fingers get pointed at Armstrong.

Director Tay Garnett and D.P. Arthur Miller try their hardest, but they shoot a lot of this outdoors and the sound rigs aren't up to it. Neither is the slow-and-dumb characterization of Armstrong very interesting. On the plus side, there are a couple of tracking shots early on, plenty of contemporary railroad slang in the dialogue, and the final sequence, which is shot half wild, permits some movement with undercranking that makes it genuinely interesting. On the whole, though, it has aged very poorly.


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