A couple of roving vagabonds hitch a freight to the railroad town of Linda, and between bouts with the fright-yard bulls and other drifters, find romance in the persons of two waitresses at... See full summary »

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(story "No Brakes"-The Saturday Evening Post), (scenario) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Dusty Reilly
Patricia Caron ...
Pinkie
...
The Elk
Budd Fine ...
Pop Eye (as Bud Fine)
...
Hot Foot
...
Splinters
Paul Hurst ...
Railroad-Yard Superintendent
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Storyline

A couple of roving vagabonds hitch a freight to the railroad town of Linda, and between bouts with the fright-yard bulls and other drifters, find romance in the persons of two waitresses at the camp restaurant. American-slang rules the dialogue to the point non-USA viewers need a slang-glossary to follow the dialogue. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Passed
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Details

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Release Date:

19 October 1929 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

No Brakes  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Photophone System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Love Found Me
Written by Tay Garnett, George Green and George Waggner
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User Reviews

 
The trips on this train really are trippy.
14 May 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Back in the days when hobos could hop on freight trains, they could get free trips anywhere, provided that they weren't caught, and if they were, their next free trip would be one they didn't want to take. In the case of drifters Robert Armstrong and James Gleason, they seem to be lucky in that aspect with the exception of whom they encounter as far as other drifters. This swell early talkie is filled with lots of moving train action, starting off with a fight on top of the moving train, then moves into a rough but romantic direction when Armstrong and Gleason settle into a town called Linda. There they meet two hard-boiled waitresses (Patricia Caron and Zasu Pitts) who strike their fancy, and vice versa. The film culminates with the same villains from the first reel once again fighting with Armstrong and Gleason, with the car they are on top of all of a sudden becoming loose and heading towards a passenger train. It's up to Caron and Pitts to rescue them, with Zasu ironically getting to the switch hopefully in the nick of time. As speedy as a moving train, this only suffers a little bit for its creakiness, while some of the situations (especially the sped-up fight scenes) are unintentionally funny. It marks an interesting early directing credit for Tay Garnett who has directed many classics but is unfortunately a forgotten name among the great directors of the golden age of cinema.


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