7.8/10
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7 user 1 critic

Navy Blues (1929)

Passed | | Comedy, Drama | 20 December 1929 (USA)
On shore leave, a young sailor meets and falls in love with a pretty young blonde. He goes home with her to meet her parents, but they don't approve of him at all. Their daughter takes ... See full summary »

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(story), (adapted by) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Alice
...
Sven Swanson
J.C. Nugent ...
Mr. Brown
...
Mrs. Brown
Wade Boteler ...
Higgins
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Frankie Genardi
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Storyline

On shore leave, a young sailor meets and falls in love with a pretty young blonde. He goes home with her to meet her parents, but they don't approve of him at all. Their daughter takes offense at this, and in the ensuing argument she storms out of the house determined to live on her own. She believes that her new boyfriend will marry her, but when he admits that he's not the marrying kind and then goes back to sea, she feels hurt and rejected and her life goes into a downward spiral. Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

20 December 1929 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Corazón de marino  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Turner library print)

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was the first all-talking picture William Haines starred in. He had previously starred in MGM's first talkie, a silent film with talking sequences, in 1928 and had appeared in MGM's 1929 all-star revue. See more »

Soundtracks

Sailing, Sailing (Over the Bounding Main)
(1880) (uncredited)
Written by Godfrey Marks
(pseudonym of James Frederick Swift)
Sung a cappella by J.C. Nugent
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User Reviews

 
"Charming" Billy Haines
11 May 2010 | by (New York, NY) – See all my reviews

As a happy-go-lucky sailor who woos, leaves, and returns to sweet, low-class Anita Page, William Haines plays what he always plays, and it hasn't worn well. What may have been charming and cheeky in 1929 now comes across as self-centered and smug, with Haines' character making unfunny jokes, hitting up his Navy pal (the equally unwatchable Karl Dane) for loans he doesn't intend to pay back, avoiding responsibility, and playing a love'-em-and-leave-'em cad. Despite what we now know about Haines, he's a convincing ladies' man--just not very appealing. Clarence Brown directs with a more mobile camera than most 1929 talkies boasted, and the Navy footage is interesting historically. And Page, with an emotional scene or two, acquits herself nicely. But all these characters just seem kind of simpleminded, and we're not particularly rooting for these two to end up together, whatever the screenplay is telling us.


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