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Animated figure Talkie gets a visit from his friend Mutie in search for a job. Talkie takes him to the Western Electric sound lab, where a technician explains the process of putting sound ... See full summary »

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(story) (as W.E. Erpi)
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Cast

Credited cast:
Carlyle Ellis ...
Narrator
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Storyline

Animated figure Talkie gets a visit from his friend Mutie in search for a job. Talkie takes him to the Western Electric sound lab, where a technician explains the process of putting sound on film and reproducing it in the theatre. Written by Michael Jurich <jurich@rummelplatz.uni-mannheim.de>

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Release Date:

21 June 1929 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This is the first short to feature the songs "Good night, Ladies" and "Merrily We Roll Along." See more »

Connections

Featured in The Dawn of Sound: How Movies Learned to Talk (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

Merrily We Roll Along
(uncredited)
Written by Murray Mencher, Charles Tobias and Eddie Cantor
Sung by Talkie and Mutie at the end of the picture
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User Reviews

corrections and additions
8 April 2006 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

"Vitaphone" does not appear in any of the credits or drawings in this delightful and educational film. Nor is "Vitaphone" spoken in the soundtrack. In the context of sound films, "Vitaphone" originally referred to the sound on disk system that Warner Brothers licensed from Western Electric. The system depicted in "FHV" is Western Electric's variable density sound on film system. During and after Warner's transition from the sound-on-disk to sound-on-film systems, "Vitaphone" continued to be used as a trademark.

There is a third voice in the film: that of Dr. Western. Because of the manner in which his lines are delivered, I suspect that this might be the voice of a Western Electric employee. I surmise this because the film was produced by Western Eletric to explain and publicize the process.

The writer credit needs to be clarified. W.E. Erpi is a pseudonym and an inside joke. ERPI: Electrical Research Products Inc. was at that time the marketing and sales division of Western Electric, which in turn was the manufacturing division of AT&T.


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