7.2/10
1,745
34 user 9 critic

Coquette (1929)

Unrated | | Drama, Romance | 6 April 1929 (USA)
A flirtatious southern belle is compromised with one of her beaus.

Director:

Writers:

(based on the stage production by), (based on the stage production by) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Won 1 Oscar. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Drama | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

The tenements are home to an international community, including the friends and family of a tough young ragamuffin named Annie Rooney, but their neighborhood may be threatened by a potentially dangerous street gang.

Director: William Beaudine
Stars: Mary Pickford, William Haines, Walter James
Secrets (1933)
Drama | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

In the late 1800s New England, banker William Marlowe and his wife Martha have arranged for their daughter Mary to marry the officious and older Lord Hurley of England. Mary does not want ... See full summary »

Director: Frank Borzage
Stars: Mary Pickford, Leslie Howard, C. Aubrey Smith
Min and Bill (1930)
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Min, the owner of a dockside hotel, is forced to make difficult decisions about the future of Nancy, the young woman she took in as an infant.

Director: George W. Hill
Stars: Marie Dressler, Wallace Beery, Dorothy Jordan
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

An orphan discovers that she has an anonymous benefactor who is willing to pay her college tuition, unaware he's the same man who has been romantically pursuing her.

Director: Marshall Neilan
Stars: Mary Pickford, Milla Davenport, Percy Haswell
My Best Girl (1927)
Comedy | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Joe Merrill, son of the millionaire owner of a chain of 5 and 10 cent stores, poses as Joe Grant, and takes a job in the stockroom of one of his father's stores, to prove that he can be a ... See full summary »

Director: Sam Taylor
Stars: Mary Pickford, Charles 'Buddy' Rogers, Sunshine Hart
A Free Soul (1931)
Certificate: Passed Crime | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

An alcoholic lawyer who successfully defended a notorious gambler on a murder charge objects when his free-spirited daughter becomes romantically involved with him.

Director: Clarence Brown
Stars: Norma Shearer, Leslie Howard, Lionel Barrymore
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

A prostitute seeking a fresh start becomes the obsession of a religious extremist.

Director: Raoul Walsh
Stars: Lionel Barrymore, Blanche Friderici, Charles Lane
The Divorcee (1930)
Certificate: Passed Romance | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

When a woman discovers that her husband has been unfaithful to her, she decides to respond to his infidelities in kind.

Director: Robert Z. Leonard
Stars: Norma Shearer, Robert Montgomery, Chester Morris
Kiki (1931)
Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  
Director: Sam Taylor
Stars: Mary Pickford, Reginald Denny, Joseph Cawthorn
Sparrows (1926)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

Molly, the eldest child at a baby farm hidden deep in a swamp, must rescue the others when their cruel master decides that one of them will be disposed of.

Directors: William Beaudine, Tom McNamara
Stars: Mary Pickford, Roy Stewart, Mary Louise Miller
Dangerous (1935)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

An alcoholic actress who is considered a dangerous jinx is rehabilitated, but she then shows that she's as dangerous as ever.

Director: Alfred E. Green
Stars: Bette Davis, Franchot Tone, Margaret Lindsay
Certificate: Passed Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

An alcoholic doctor on a Polynesian island, disgusted by white exploitation of the natives, finds himself marooned on a pristinely beautiful island.

Directors: W.S. Van Dyke, Robert J. Flaherty
Stars: Monte Blue, Raquel Torres, Robert Anderson
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Michael Jeffery (as John Mack Brown)
...
Stanley Wentworth
...
Dr. John Besant
...
Jimmy Besant
...
Jasper Carter
...
Robert Wentworth
...
Julia
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jay Berger
Edit

Storyline

Norma Besant, daughter of a Southern doctor, is an incorrigible flirt and has many boys on her string. She begins to favor Michael Jeffrey, who, shiftless and hot-tempered but fundamentally honorable, is warned off by her father. When Michael returns after a long absence, the pair are innocently compromised, and Dr. Besant's old-South paternal rage brings tragedy. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A new Mary with boyish bob and flirty eyes - Coquette is the crowning achievement of her career. (Newspaper ad). See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

6 April 1929 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Coqueta  »

Box Office

Budget:

$489,106 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(MovieTone)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

At the Rialto Theatre April 1929 world premiere of Coquette got off to a disastrous start. A fuse blew two minutes after the start and the film had to be begun again. See more »

Quotes

Norma Besant: [to Wentworth after her father's suicide] I've got to hurry along home now and help Jimmy with his algebra.
See more »

Connections

Spoofed in Twentieth Century (1934) See more »

Soundtracks

LI'L LIZA JANE
(1916) (uncredited)
Written by Ada De Lachau
Sung in part by uncredited actor
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Watch it as history....
5 January 2004 | by (Washington, DC) – See all my reviews

More than the silents that preceded it, this is a rare glimpse into a world that is almost impossible for our generation to imagine. The acting style seems bizarre by modern standards. The characters walk as if they were trying to dance, and they speak as if they would rather sing their lines. Okay, sound equipment may have been awful then - "talkies" were brand new in 1929 - but that fact does nothing to make it less pretentious when the characters stretch their mouths to yawn proportions to utter dated lines like, "darling, I love you more than life itself."

Then there's the plot, another feature of this film that is as quaint as the acting and the dialogue. "Norma," played legendary silent screen actress Mary Pickford at the end of her prolific career, becomes "compromised" by a night with a boyfriend, Michael. Michael vows to marry her but instead finds himself in an angry confrontation with Norma's father, the doctor.

Father takes a gun to avenge his violated daughter - who is played, remember, by a 37-year-old woman. And poor Norma, finding her lover on his deathbed, pours forth a mind-numbing, melodramatic declaration of her love that had to have been way over the top even in those days.

But the most amazing part is the end, where the doctor is on trial for murder. Norma takes the stand to accuse her lover of rape and thus save her father, which she does admirably and with all the flourishes and eye-batting appropriate for the era. Suddenly, the father's conscience is stirred and he rushes to the feet of his daughter - this in a court of law - and pleads with her to let him take the blame with honor. The doctor eyes the murder weapon, a revolver sitting on a table before the judge, and then stands before the court and demands that he pay his debt to the state. Imagine that!

Father then rushes to the arms of daughter and begs her to "hug daddy" as she used to. What follows was surely, even to audiences of the day, an excessively-long, gruesomely-sentimental embrace. To a modern viewer seeing it in the contemporary context, it would clearly suggest incest, though this was certainly not the meaning of the scene. That done, father grabs gun and commits suicide in the courtroom. To the film's credit, the event is conveyed well by the sound of a single gunshot - no blood.

Pickford may have been the darling of silent film, and she was undeniably a remarkable actress in that setting. But her talkie debut is flawed in every conceivable way, from the bogus southern accents of her and others' characters to the comical arm gestures she makes to emphasize her schmaltzy love-talk with Michael.

You have to cut this film some slack not only for the year it was made, but also because sound movies were then in their infancy. Still, the story line and script are painfully exaggerated and the acting horribly stilted.

But is it worth watching? I say yes. It's important cinema history. And it's fun.


7 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?