Leary is using the Express Agent's liking for alcohol to enable his men to steal insured packages. Then he claims the insurance. Railroad Agent Hartley is sent to investigate and suspecting... See full summary »

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(screenplay) (as G.A. Durlam), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

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Vivian Bay ...
Phyliss Gordon
Bobby Dunn ...
Shorty Gordon
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Leary
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Leary Henchman
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Leary Henchman
Tom Bay ...
Speed Harris (as Tommy Bay)
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Sheriff (as Buck Bucko)
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Storyline

Leary is using the Express Agent's liking for alcohol to enable his men to steal insured packages. Then he claims the insurance. Railroad Agent Hartley is sent to investigate and suspecting Leary, he and the Sheriff plan to trap them the next time they try their scheme. Written by Maurice VanAuken <mvanauken@a1access.net>

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Western

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November 1929 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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slowly-paced but interesting late-silent western with Bob Custer
18 March 2005 | by (south Texas USA) – See all my reviews

The more silent work of Bob Custer (aka Raymond Glenn) that I see, the more impressed I am with him. He radiates a strength and warmth on the silent screen that just doesn't transfer to the world of sound, although he certainly is not BAD in his sound films for the most part. It's just when I see him in a silent film, it's clear why he became a star. He projects that kind of persona in CODE OF THE WEST, a late silent feature western directed by the prolific J.P. McGowan. If you are looking for action, constant fistfights, and exciting chases, get another film as this one is slowly-paced. The story revolves around a group of crooked cowboys who are stealing insured packages and then submitting fraudulent claims to the railroad company. Railroad inspector Bob Custer is called in to analyze the situation. Part of the problem comes from the weak-willed, but well-meaning local station supervisor, very well-played by silent comedian Bobby Dunn. This is a role that requires a lot of depth, with a man who can be weakened with alcohol and manipulated by others, and who realizes his weaknesses and tries to not acknowledge them. Dunn does a wonderful job, and also gets to use his physical comedy skills. More intellect than brawn is used to crack the case, and when the final showdown comes in the saloon, which Custer tries to close single-handedly, it almost has a High Noon-style intensity to it because there HAVE NOT been constant shootouts throughout the film. I like this film a lot and I look forward to seeing another Custer western of the same period, THE LAST ROUND-UP, which I just received. One question I have to anyone who's seen this film: what the heck is that railing on the stairs made of that BENDS when Custer and the man chasing him grab on to it?


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