The Broadway Melody
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6 items from 2012


TCM Offers Ultimate Studio Tour With 2013 Edition Of 31 Days Of Oscar; The Academy Awards February 24th

17 December 2012 12:59 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

As the Academy celebrates 85 years of great films at the Oscars on February 24th, Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is set to take movie fans on the ultimate studio tour with the 2013 edition of 31 Days Of Oscar®. Under the theme Oscar by Studio, the network will present a slate of more than 350 movies grouped according to the studios that produced or released them. And as always, every film presented during 31 Days Of Oscar is an Academy Award® nominee or winner, making this annual event one of the most anticipated on any movie lover’s calendar.

As part of the network’s month-long celebration, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has graciously provided the original Academy Awards® radio broadcasts from 1930-1952. Specially chosen clips from the radio archives will be featured throughout TCM’s 31 Days Of Oscar website.

Hollywood was built upon the studio system, which saw nearly ever aspect »

- Michelle McCue

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Will 'Les Miserables' rekindle Oscar's love affair with musicals?

29 October 2012 2:01 AM, PDT | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

On paper, "Les Miserables" seems like the perfect Oscar movie. With its prestigious source material, all-star cast, period setting and epic scope, the film looks poised to garner a high number of nominations. Eight of our Experts are predicting it to win Best Picture, giving it odds of 11 to 2, behind frontrunner "Argo."  -Insertgroups:8- "Les Miserables" belongs to one of the academy’s most beloved genres: the movie musical. Well, at times one of their most beloved genres, that is. The academy has had a love/hate relationship with the movie musical over its eighty-five years, either rewarding or ignoring films built on song-and-dance numbers. Musicals have been winning Oscars since the earliest days of the awardsfest: "The Broadway Melody"(1929) was the second film ever to win Best Picture.  After that came wins for "The Great Ziegfeld" (1936), "An American in Paris" (1951), "Gigi&quot »

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The Wizard of Oz Gets 3D Conversion in Honor of Warner Bros.' 90th Anniversary

3 October 2012 3:45 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Warner Bros. announced today that the 1939 classic The Wizard of Oz will be fully restored and converted into 3D, as a part of the studio's 90th Anniversary celebration next year. The film is currently being restored and will be released on Blu-ray 3D in either September or October of next year. The studio also announced a number of massive Blu-ray and DVD collections to celebrate their diverse catalog. Take a look at the studio's 90th Anniversary logo, and then read the full press release for more details.

One of the most respected, diversified and successful motion picture studios in the world, Warner Bros. began when the eponymous brothers - Harry, Albert, Sam, and Jack - incorporated on April 4, 1923. Four years later, the release of The Jazz Singer, the world's first "talkie," set a tone of innovation and influence that would forever become synonymous with the Warner Bros. brand. Soon to be 90, Warner Bros. »

- MovieWeb

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Clara Bow, Andrei Tarkovsky, Audrey Hepburn Movies

20 April 2012 7:23 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Clara Bow, Mantrap What do Andrei Tarkovsky, Edward G. Robinson, Clara Bow, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Audrey Hepburn have in common? Easy. They'll all be featured in some form or other at the Library of Congress' Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, in May. [Packard Campus screening schedule.] Andrei Tarkovsky will be represented by the classic sci-fier Solaris (1971), billed as the Soviet Union's answer to Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, and by the classic period drama Andrei Rublev (1969), a meditation on art, religion, spirituality, and human brutality and stupidity. A technicality: Solaris will actually be screened on April 27. Edward G. Robinson stars in The Little Giant (1933), a pre-Code crime comedy featuring Mary Astor. The (at the time) energetic Roy Del Ruth (The Maltese Falcon, Taxi!, Employees' Entrance) directed. Clara Bow is the star of Mantrap (1926), a fluffy romantic comedy of interest chiefly because of Bow and because neither of her two leading »

- Andre Soares

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Daily Viewing. David Cairns's "Pensive Crackle"

4 April 2012 9:46 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

"Here's a recently discovered experimental film from 1929, A Theatrical Hotel on 46th St, New York also known as Pensive Crackle," wrote David Cairns at his Shadowplay the other day. "It uses the particular quality of the early soundtrack, that 'warm bath of audio hiss' Guy Maddin has spoken of, with its accompanying soft crackle and bump, as an atmospheric effect, and lets it gradually seep into the onscreen characters, poisoning them as surely as a diet of gunpowder and wasp venom. It starts quite funny, and slowly turns bleaker and bleaker."

The date of that post: April 1. Today at the Chiseler, David notes that "a lot of people said nice things about the film, and I couldn't tell if they knew it was me and were playing along, or were genuinely taken in. There was no way to ask without seeming like the gullible one — I was hoisted by my own April Fool's petard. »

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The history of MGM: Hollywood domination

16 January 2012 3:46 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Our look back over the history of MGM continues, as the silent era gives way to the talkies and musicals of the 20s and 30s...

It’s 1928, and the success of Warner Bros’ musical, The Jazz Singer, has ushered in a new age of talking pictures. Audiences adored it, and it was sink or swim time for MGM. Suddenly, the silent cinema rule book was thrown out of the window and numerous opportunities opened up in Hollywood.

Composers were in demand, and song and script writers, along with voice coaches, were needed more than ever. White Shadows In The South Seas was the first MGM sound picture, although not a talkie. Originally filmed as a silent picture, MGM realised that sound wasn’t just a passing fad and, like most studios at the time, swiftly added sound effects to its music. But they did make one character speak – and that was Leo the lion, »

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6 items from 2012


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