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You're Darn Tootin' (1928)

6.8
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Ratings: 6.8/10 from 677 users  
Reviews: 16 user | 5 critic

Members of a municipal band, Stanley and Oliver seem to be always following someone else's lead, rather than that of the temperamental conductor. Soon they're out of a job, as well as their... See full summary »

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Title: You're Darn Tootin' (1928)

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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Stanley, clarinet player
...
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Wilson Benge ...
Musician
Chet Brandenburg ...
Manhole worker
Christian J. Frank ...
Policeman
Dick Gilbert ...
Boarder
Charlie Hall ...
Musician
William Irving ...
Musician
Ham Kinsey ...
Musician
Otto Lederer ...
Bandleader
Sam Lufkin ...
Man in restaurant
George Rowe ...
Pedestrian
Frank Saputo
Rolfe Sedan ...
Drunk
Agnes Steele ...
Landlady
Edit

Storyline

Members of a municipal band, Stanley and Oliver seem to be always following someone else's lead, rather than that of the temperamental conductor. Soon they're out of a job, as well as their lodgings when the landlady finds out they've been fired. The boys try their luck at being street musicians, but the tiffs they get into with each other soon spread to passersby in general, until the street is filled with men pulling each other's pants off. Written by Paul Penna <tterrace@wco.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Comedy | Music

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

21 April 1928 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Music Blasters  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Ham Kinsey, listed on the credits as "Musician", was also Stan Laurel's stand-in. See more »

Goofs

In the course of the escalating tiff on the street between Stan and Ollie, there are multiple instances of Ollie punching Stan in the stomach, followed by Stan kicking Ollie in the shins. After a few of these, tactics are changed to ripping handkerchiefs, removing or shredding ties, etc. After the latter takes place, the handkerchief and tie is seen lying on the ground. But then, a couple of shots are inserted of more stomach punching and shin kicking, which were actually shot earlier and show the boys' ties and handkerchiefs still intact. See more »

Connections

Featured in Silent Clowns: Laurel and Hardy (2006) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Reaching the Summit of "Everest"
24 May 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

WITH THE RELEASE of this 1928 silent, the LAUREL & HARDY team was established, complete and the L & H that we all know and have loved all of our lives. The only element missing is a soundtrack; and that may well have been an additional amenity.

MANY HAVE THEORIZED that YOU'RE DARN TOOTIN' may well have planned as a sound picture. If not a true "Talkie", it probably would have had the benefit of music and sound effects. It surely is an intriguing notion and there is plenty of 'circumstantial evidence' to support this notion.

BUT, SOUNDTRACK OR not, the 2 reeler marks a very important place in the history of Laurel & Hardy; as well as the direction that was taken by the HAL ROACH STUDIO. In it we find a well meshed Stan & Ollie, fully outfitted in their trademark bowlers (that's another name for derbies, Schultz), bow tie (Laurel) and necktie (Hardy). By this time, Stan Laurel had even adopted that scraggly, high topped hairdo.

THE OVERALL LOOK of this picture is both bright and realistically staged; with the vast portion of the filming being done out of doors. It is done mainly in the streets of Culver City in suburban LA. It was there that the HAL ROACH STUDIO was situated.

AS WAS THE case in all of the Roach product at that time (and for some years before),the titles were written by H.M. Walker. It was his wit and mastery of the King's English that added a real class to the silent films of L & H, Charley Chase, early Harold Lloyd, Snub Pollard and so many other series. Mr. Walker continued on the job after the ascent of the talkies, writing dialogue as well as those great title starters that typically were characteristic of L & H sound shorts.

ANOTHER ASPECT OF the title cards utilized at this juncture was an abandonment of those which consistently relied on humor which was unrelated to the story on the screen. These included both references to the habits of the characters, as well as giving them purposely outlandish sounding names. This was a regular over at Roach's good friend as well as his rival, Mack Sennett at KEYSTONE COMEDIES.

IN ADDITION TO opting for a more subtle and clever type of title, Roach and associates moved to do things much more s-l-o-w-l-y. Instead of rapid fire stacking the gags, one on top of the other, the writers and directors would exploit the gag situationals from every different angle. Their favourite ploy of presenting physical conflicts was dubbed "Reciprocal Destruction" by Roach Studio's supervising Director, Leo McCarey.

IN IT THE combatants would alternate in doing harm to each other or to the property of the other; all the while there was no attempt by either side to prevent any of the mayhem.

IT WAS LARGELY the efforts of Mr. McCarey and Stan Laurel that established this slow, deliberate style. It was also the principal that brought Stan Laurel's screen persona that we all are so familiar with. (Just you screen a Stan Laurel comedy from before the teaming with "Babe"-as Oliver Hardy was known to his friends).

SO THAT BRINGS us to the movie itself. We have already stated our opinion that YOU'RE DARN TOOTIN' was the zenith of the L & H series and established what was basically the 'finished product.' It is non-pretentious, smoothly conceived and truly funny. Its cleverly rendered pacing along with the chain-reaction like building of the final sequence all make it a primer for doing a comedy, short or not.

AND IT IS this finale that does its best to comply with the primary rule of comedy. That being: "Always Leave 'Em Laughing" *

NOTE: * The ending of Robert Youngson's compilation tribute film LAUREL & HARDY'S LAUGHING 20s (1965) uses this comic windup for its own ending.


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