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Tusalava (1929)

7.0
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Ratings: 7.0/10 from 122 users  
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With the screen split asymmetrically, one part in positive, the other negative, the film documents the evolution of simple celled organic forms into chains of cells then more complex images... See full summary »

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Title: Tusalava (1929)

Tusalava (1929) on IMDb 7/10

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Storyline

With the screen split asymmetrically, one part in positive, the other negative, the film documents the evolution of simple celled organic forms into chains of cells then more complex images from tribal cultures and contemporary modernist concepts. The images react, interpenetrate, perhaps attack, absorb and separate, until a final symbiosis (or redemption?) is achieved. Written by Stewart Naunton <snaunton@online.ru>

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Genres:

Short | Animation

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1 December 1929 (UK)  »

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1.37 : 1
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The film survived soundless, but was originally screened with a live musical performance by Jack Ellitt using 2 pianos. See more »

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User Reviews

 
The wonder and terror of organic forms.
8 December 2001 | by (Moscow, Russia) – See all my reviews

This astonishing film, with its screen split between positive and negative (and which is which?), evolves primaeval single-celled nuclear forms into living, rhythmic chains of existence and then, beyond, into creatures of tribal consciousness, both ancient and utterly contemporary. This film captures the mutability of existence, the ambiguity between fertile penetration and aggression, absorption and synthesis. To watch it is an exquisite experience.


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