IMDb > Sadie Thompson (1928)
Sadie Thompson
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Sadie Thompson (1928) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
8.1/10   1,764 votes »
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Up 42% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
W. Somerset Maugham (story)
Raoul Walsh (adaptation)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Sadie Thompson on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
7 January 1928 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Sadie could storm any barrack she attacked! Magnetism had never been heard of until she hit town! What a woman! You'll say so, too! See more »
Plot:
A prostitute seeking a fresh start becomes the obsession of a religious extremist. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Oscars. See more »
NewsDesk:
(6 articles)
The Letter (1929) Review: Jeanne Eagels Sole Extant Talking Performance
 (From Alt Film Guide. 27 January 2012, 3:33 PM, PST)

Sadie Thompson
 (From Blogdanovich. 3 November 2011, 7:28 AM, PDT)

Another 10 Full-Length Films to Watch Online!
 (From Obsessed with Film. 21 April 2011, 8:11 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
Gloria is Magic! See more (15 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)
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Directed by
Raoul Walsh 
 
Writing credits
W. Somerset Maugham (story)

Raoul Walsh (adaptation)

C. Gardner Sullivan (titles)

John Colton  play "Rain" (uncredited)
Clemence Randolph  play "Rain" (uncredited)

Produced by
Gloria Swanson .... producer (uncredited)
Raoul Walsh .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Joseph Turrin (1987)
 
Cinematography by
George Barnes (photographed by)
Robert Kurrle (photographed by)
Oliver T. Marsh (photographed by) (as Oliver Marsh)
 
Film Editing by
C. Gardner Sullivan (edited by)
 
Art Direction by
William Cameron Menzies 
 
Production Management
Pierre Bedard .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
William Tummel .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Dennis Doros .... archivist (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
USA:91 min (reconstructed version) | USA:97 min (original version)
Country:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The musical version of Sadie Thompson opened at the Alvin Theater on November 16, 1944 and ran for 60 performances.See more »
Quotes:
Sadie Thompson:[screaming at Alfred Davidson] Who gave you the right to pass judgement on me? You psalm-singing louse! You'd tear out you own mother's heart, if she didn't agree with you, and call it saving her soul!See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Q (1982)See more »

FAQ

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8 out of 11 people found the following review useful.
Gloria is Magic!, 29 March 2007
Author: ducdebrabant from New York City, USA

In a number of different ways, "Sadie Thompson" shows how much guts Gloria Swanson had. In the first place, it wouldn't even exist if she hadn't turned down an extremely lucrative contract from Famous Players/Lasky in order to become her own producer at United Artists. There had been a gentlemen's agreement among the major Hollywood producers that none of them would buy the play "Rain," but Swanson was of course not a party to it. What she actually did was very clever and sneaky. She bought Maugham's original story "The Fall of a Leaf" -- not the stage adaptation by Clemence Dane -- and thus stayed under the radar. The theatrical producers didn't control movie rights to the story. Then she got Will Hays to approve an adaptation of that short story, keeping the wool over his eyes a bit and using all of her feminine charm. Hays was a Swanson fan (most men, I gather, were) and the lady got her way and put it over on Mayer, Laemmle, Zukor, et al. She did make some concessions, however, the most important one being that Lionel Barrymore not play a clergyman. If you notice, he's not called Reverend Davidson here, but Mister Davidson. It hardly matters, since nobody who saw the film ever thought of him as anything but a minister. Swanson's instincts were right on target in every department. She had hired Walsh to direct and suddenly realized he should be her leading man, and he's stupendous. They had a delightful, easy rapport, and although Walsh has sex appeal he's no movie Adonis, keeping it real. Swanson also dared to wear becoming but flashy and inelegant clothes, which was risky for the movies' most notable clotheshorse (the last time she had dressed dowdy, while under contract, the audiences stayed away, and the studio never let her do it again). Swanson's Sadie is able to live her life with good cheer because she genuinely likes men. This was certainly true of Swanson, whose father was out of the picture early, and who was always looking for a strong man. She was extremely curious, and always gravitated to the people at parties who knew the most -- usually the guys. Gloria Swanson as Sadie is kinetic. Her gaiety and charm are so incandescent that the biggest sin as you are watching the movie would have to be anything that dimmed her light. Davidson makes it go out, and that's exactly what happens to Swanson. When she "reforms," all the light goes right out of her. Barrymore is great, and we are so fortunate to have the movie in any form. It's probably Swanson's best performance outside of "Sunset Boulevard," and it's a great movie performance by any standard. Which brings to mind another point. No actress in Swanson's lifetime up to that point had ever given a more celebrated performance than Jeanne Eagels in "Rain," and Gloria dared to risk comparisons that would inevitably be made. We can't make those comparisons now, but you can't watch the movie and not feel that this lady, so made for the camera, so perfectly in control of all the tools of silent movie acting, gave Jeanne a run for her money.

(Despite another comment here, Swanson's liaison with Joseph Kennedy did not give her "the clout to become her own producer." At the time Swanson went to UA, she hadn't even met Joe Kennedy, and she didn't meet him until after she had already produced "Sadie Thompson." Kennedy was a very minor player in the movies, and Swanson was one of the biggest stars in the world. If anything, she gave HIM clout. Indeed, when he did become her partner in Gloria Productions, he seems to have robbed her blind, even billing her production company for his own gifts to her. Kennedy, staunchly Catholic if hypocritical, strongly disapproved of "Sadie Thompson.")

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