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Criterion Now – Episode 41 – March 2018 Announcements, Barry Lyndon

Aaron is joined by Chris and Justin from Casually Criterion, a brand new podcast that explores the Criterion Collection a spine number at a time. We discuss the Criterion March 2018 announcements, many of which were a refreshing surprise, and we do a slightly deeper dive into Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon. We also cover the latest in Criterion news and FilmStruck.

Episode Notes

8:30 – March 2018 Announcements

32:00 – New Releases

36:00 – Criterion News

44:20 – Barry Lyndon

58:20 – Short Takes (Seven Samurai, Amarcord, Election)

1:06:00 – FilmStruck

Episode Links Criterion – The Age of Innocence Criterion – Baal Criterion – The Passion of Joan of Arc Criterion – Women in Love Criterion – King of Jazz Janus Films Twitter – 8 Hours a Day Janus Films Twitter – Memories of Underdevelopment Noticias Monterrey – Carlos Reygadas Sight & Sound – Best of 2017 Blu-Ray 2017 National Film Registry Inductees Episode Credits Aaron West: Twitter | Website | Letterboxd

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Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More Join Criterion Collection in March 2018

Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More Join Criterion Collection in March 2018
Martin Scorsese is no stranger to The Criterion Collection, but that doesn’t make the announcement that his period drama “The Age of Innocence” will be officially joining the club in March 2018 any less exciting. Scorsese’s 1993 adaptation of Edith Wharton’s seminal novel will join other Scorsese films like “The Last Temptation of Christ” in the Collection.

Read More:‘Silence of the Lambs,’ ‘Night of the Living Dead,’ and More Join Criterion Collection in February 2018

“Innocence” is one of six new movies coming to Criterion in March 2018. Other new additions include Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent masterpiece “The Passion of Joan of Arc” and Volker Schlöndorff’s largely-unseen “Baal.” You can head over to The Criterion Collection website to pre-order the titles now. Check out all the new additions below. Synopses provided by Criterion.

Elevator to the Gallows

For his feature debut, twenty-four-year-old Louis Malle brought together a mesmerizing performance by Jeanne Moreau,
See full article at Indiewire »

NYC Weekend Watch: Goth(ic), Maurice Pialat, William Wyler & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Lynch, Hitchcock, Bride of Frankenstein and more come together in “Goth(ic).”

Letter from an Unknown Woman and The Umbrellas of Cherbourg also screen.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

Rossellini, Murnau, Warhol, Pialat and more screen as part of “The Non-Actor.”

Film Forum

The Passion of Joan of Arc has its final days

One of Murnau’s greatest films,
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: The Non-Actor, Bertolucci, Aki Kaurismäki & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

“The Non-Actor,” a series so big it seems to encompass the entire history of cinema, is now underway.

Quad Cinema

A retrospective of Bertolucci’s Italian films has kicked off.

Restorations of Renoir’s The Crime of Monsieur Lange and Rivette’s La Belle Noiseuse are screening.

Metrograph

Films by Hartley,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Movie Poster of the Week: Carl Th. Dreyer’s “The Passion of Joan of Arc”

  • MUBI
I am excited to be premiering Janus Films’ brand new poster for their re-release of The Passion of Joan of Arc, one of my all-time favorite films and one of the most beautiful films ever made. Designed by Eric Skillman, the new poster is simplicity itself, relying on a single still of Maria Falconetti as Joan in her most iconic pose, and although the beauty of Dreyer’s masterpiece is that almost any still from the film would be poster-worthy, this one is perfect. It’s the clarity of the image that carries the poster, and which whets the appetite for the digital restoration it heralds, but the type block below is suitably elegant and restrained.I did a previous feature on the film a few years ago, concentrating on the artwork of the great René Péron, but there are a number of other wonderful designs for the film which
See full article at MUBI »

Criterion Now – Episode 35 – January 2018 Announcements, Flash Sale

Aaron is joined by Mark Hurne and Jason Michael to catch up on a month’s worth of Criterion stuff, including January 2018 announcements. We talk about what we got in the latest Flash Sale, many of the recent Janus Films announcements from restoration screenings to posters, and we share some Short Takes that are technically horror, but not too scary.

Episode Notes

6:00 – January 2018 Announcements

29:30 – Flash Sale and Criterion News

59:15 – Short Takes (Cronos, Cat People, The Lure))

1:08:21 – FilmStruck

Episode Links Agnes Varda Closet Picks Filminc – Pandora’s Box Janus FilmsThe Passion of Joan of Arc Sean Phillip’s Night of the Living Dead poster Janus FilmsThe Other Side of Hope poster Certain Women – Discussion Thread Federico Luppi Dies at 83 Danielle Darrieux Dies at 100 Episode Credits Aaron West: Twitter | Website | Letterboxd Mark Hurne: Twitter Jason Michael: Twitter | Instagram | Website Criterion Now: Facebook Group Criterion
See full article at CriterionCast »

Harvey Aftershocks: Hollywood’s Battle Against Sleaze Fatigue

Harvey Aftershocks: Hollywood’s Battle Against Sleaze Fatigue
With Harvey Weinstein gone, the entertainment industry operates under a new ruler: The gut check. He’s now a punching bag to represent abuse by powerful men, but now the real work begins. What about everyone else?

“Harvey is aberrant, to be sure, but no anomaly,” veteran screenwriter and USC professor Howard Rodman wrote me in an email. “He’s a rapist, but not the only rapist in our industry, and not the only serial predator by a very long shot. If we use his evident and overweening guilt to exculpate the rest of us, this will be for naught. What’s needed is a sea change. And maybe — just maybe — its time has come.”

Weinstein’s predation has a very, very long tail; new stories arrive daily, with the Los Angeles Police Dept. now opening an investigation into an alleged rape in 2013. “It’s been such crazy couple of weeks,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Harvey Aftershocks: Hollywood’s Battle Against Sleaze Fatigue

Harvey Aftershocks: Hollywood’s Battle Against Sleaze Fatigue
With Harvey Weinstein gone, the entertainment industry operates under a new ruler: The gut check. He’s now a punching bag to represent abuse by powerful men, but now the real work begins. What about everyone else?

“Harvey is aberrant, to be sure, but no anomaly,” veteran screenwriter and USC professor Howard Rodman wrote me in an email. “He’s a rapist, but not the only rapist in our industry, and not the only serial predator by a very long shot. If we use his evident and overweening guilt to exculpate the rest of us, this will be for naught. What’s needed is a sea change. And maybe — just maybe — its time has come.”

Weinstein’s predation has a very, very long tail; new stories arrive daily, with the Los Angeles Police Dept. now opening an investigation into an alleged rape in 2013. “It’s been such crazy couple of weeks,
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Academy Won’t Be ‘Inquisitorial Court,’ Oscars President Says

Film Academy Won’t Be ‘Inquisitorial Court,’ Oscars President Says
The president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, John Bailey, sent a letter today to members of the organization titled “In the Matter of H. Weinstein…and Beyond,” condemning Harvey Weinstein’s behavior and urging the need for a safer space for women in the film industry. However, he also stressed that “The Academy cannot, and will not, be an inquisitorial court.”

Bailey began the letter with a lengthy reference to Carl Dreyer’s classic 1928 film “The Passion of Joan of Arc,” stressing the power of Maria Falconetti’s performance as the Maid of Orleans. He emphasized that beyond its status as a visual landmark of the silent movie era, the film, which he describes as “a deeply disturbing portrait of a young woman’s persecution in the face of the male judges and priests of the ruling order,” and the wrenching memory of Falconetti’s career trajectory, have haunted
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Othello

Othello

Blu-ray

Criterion

1952 / Black and White / 1:33 / Street Date October 10, 2017

Starring Orson Welles, Suzanne Cloutier, Micheál MacLiammóir

Cinematography by G.R. Aldo, Anchise Brizzi, George Fanto, Alberto Fusi, Oberdan Troiani

Written by William Shakespeare (Adapted by Orson Welles)

Edited by Jenö Csepreghy, Renzo Lucidi, William Morton, Jean Sacha

Produced by Orson Welles, Julien Derode

Directed by Orson Welles

Shakespeare didn’t invent Orson Welles but he did define him; it can be said that if any one director took arms against the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, it was the man behind Citizen Kane, Touch of Evil and Chimes at Midnight. The 1952 production of Othello is exhibit A.

Filmed over a turbulent three year period in and around Morocco, Venice and Rome, Welles was bedeviled by an ever-changing cast and crew resulting in reshoots by five different cinematographers and assembled by four different editors. The sound recording was a joke.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra Accompany The Passion Of Joan Of Arc October 12th at Swic in Belleville, Il

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc (1928) Screens at 7:o0 Thursday, October 12th at The Schmidt Arts Center on the campus of Southwestern Illinois College in Belleville, Illinois (2500 Carlyle Ave ). The silent film will be accompanied by the Rats & People Motion Picture Orchestra.

Silent films with live music! There’s nothing like it and St. Louis is lucky to have The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra here. For the past several years, The Rats and People have actively defined both the local music and film cultures of our city. In addition to its prolific composition and live performance of new scores for films of the silent era, the ensemble – equal parts indie/punk-stalwart and classically trained composers/musicians – have provided the soundtrack for many of St. Louis’ most vital and acclaimed locally-produced contemporary films.

Thursday, October 12th at 7:00pm, The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra will perfrom their
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Vampyr (1932)

Of all the legendary early horror films Carl Theodor Dreyer’s vampire nightmare was once the most difficult to appreciate — until Criterion’s restoration of a mostly intact, un-mutilated full cut. Dreyer creates his fantasy according to his own rules — this pallid, claustrophobic horror is closer to Ordet than it is Dracula or Nosferatu.

Vampyr

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 437

1932 / Color / 1:19 Movietone Ap. / 73 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date October 3, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Julian West (Baron Nicolas De Gunzberg), Maurice Schutz, Rena Mandel, Sybille Schmitz, Jan Hieronimko, Henriette Gérard.

Cinematography: Rudolph Maté

Art Direction: Hermann Warm

Film Editor: Tonka Taldy

Original Music: Wolfgang Zeller

Written by Carl Theodor Dreyer, Christen Jul from In a Glass Darkly by Sheridan Le Fanu

Produced by Carl Theodor Dreyer, Julian West

Directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer

Carl Theodor Dreyer’s Vampyr is a tough row to hoe for horror fans, many of whom just
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

La Poison

La Poison

Blu-ray

Criterion

1951 / 1:33 / Street Date August 22, 2017

Starring: Michel Simon, Germaine Reuver

Cinematography: Jean Bachelet

Film Editor: Raymond Lamy

Written by Sacha Guitry

Produced by Jean Le Duc, Alain Poiré

Music: Louiguy

Directed by Sacha Guitry

One of the most insightful commentaries on Sacha Guitry’s La Poison can be found right there on the cover of Criterion’s beautiful new blu ray release, a typically “warts and all” portrait by Drew Freidman of the film’s stars, Michel Simon and Germaine Reuver. The film’s diabolic mix of humor and horror is illuminated by Freidman’s precise rendering of Simon’s sagging jowls, Reuver’s venomous stare and the dingy trappings of the cramped little kitchen that threatens to suffocate these damned souls before they can get around to killing each other.

Filmed in just eleven days in 1951 by the speedy Guitry, La Poison tells the story of
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The 25 Best Performances Not Nominated for an Oscar in the 21st Century, From Kristen Stewart to Andy Serkis

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best Performances Not Nominated for an Oscar in the 21st Century, From Kristen Stewart to Andy Serkis
Awards aren’t everything, but no one ever complained about having their hard work recognized. Consider that the impetus behind this list, which looks beyond awards season to shine a spotlight on the performances that have most affected us — if not necessarily the Academy — over the last 17 years. Some were contenders that got snubbed, while others were too out-there to ever be considered; all are worth praising.

Many others were and are, too — so many, in fact, that 25 spots weren’t enough for them all. Consider Denis Lavant’s bravura turn in “Holy Motors” or Maggie Gyllenhaal’s brilliant work in “Secretary,” among so many others, and remember that the first nine months of every moviegoing year feature plenty of performances worth remembering.

25. Jeon Do-yeon, “Secret Sunshine”

Lee Chang-dong movies abound in stellar performances — see also Yoon Jeong-hee in “Poetry” and Sol Kyung-gu and Moon So-ri in “Oasis” — but none
See full article at Indiewire »

Giveaway – Win The Passion of Joan of Arc on Dual Format

Eureka Entertainment to re-issue The Passion Of Joan Of Arc, Carl Theodor Dreyer’s enigmatic and profoundly moving silent masterpiece, in a Dual Format edition on 21 August 2017, and to celebrate we have three copies to give away!

One of the most emotional film experiences of any era, Carl Theodor Dreyer’s 1928 The Passion of Joan of Arc [La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc / Jeanne d’Arc’s lidelse og dod] is a miracle of the cinema, an enigmatic and profoundly moving work that merges the worlds of the viewer and of saintly Joan herself into one shared experience of hushed delirium.

Dreyer’s film charts the final days of Joan of Arc as she undergoes the debasement that accompanies her trial for charges of heresy – through her imprisonment and execution at the stake.

The portrayal of Joan by Renée Maria Falconetti is frequently heralded as the all-time finest performance in the history of film, and Dreyer’s unusual and virtuosic method, in seeming
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

8 classic feminist movies well ahead of their time

Jennifer Leigh Williamson Jun 13, 2017

As far back as the 1920s, cinema has brought us feminist heroes. Here's a bunch of films way ahead of their time...

“I never realised until lately that women were supposed to be the inferior sex.” - Katharine Hepburn

Feminism, equality of the sexes. Often when watching old movies, the sexism of the time can catch you off guard. Bums are pinched, bimbos bounce, old maids glower and you shake your head and sigh, glad that those times have (mostly) passed. So when we see classic films with strong, intelligent, impressive, witty, ambitious, feminist female characters, equals to their male counterparts, we sit up and take notice. There are many great classic films with impressive female characters, too many to list here. This article is about the characters that have inspired me personally. Classic feminist films way ahead of their time.

Spoilers ahead...

The Passion Of Joan Of Arc
See full article at Den of Geek »

Werner Herzog: The Art of Being a Death-Defying, Gonzo Filmmaking Genius

Werner Herzog: The Art of Being a Death-Defying, Gonzo Filmmaking Genius
Dan Winters for Rolling Stone

Not far from the big round dome atop the Griffith Observatory, leaning on a railing that overlooks the Greater Los Angeles sinkhole, the German director Werner Herzog, 74, removes a tissue from his pocket and dabs at his eyes. His eyes are leaking. They've been leaking for the past hour or so. The tear fluid builds up in the corner of one of his blue eyes, then starts to cascade down his cheeks, halted only when he dab, dab, dabs.

He does not explain this. In fact,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Silence review: the last temptation of Liam Neeson in Scorsese's shattering epic

Returning to themes which have haunted his whole career, Martin Scorsese has made a film of grandeur and great fervour about Christianity, martyrdom and the silence of God

The silence of God – or the deafness of man – is the theme of Martin Scorsese’s epic new film about an ordeal of belief and the mysterious, ambiguous heroism involved in humiliation and collaboration. It is about an apparent sacrifice in the service of the greater good, and a reckoning deferred to some unknowable future time. The possibility of reaching some kind of accommodation with the enemy, and not knowing if this is a disavowal of pride or a concession to the greatest sin of all, is a topic that Scorsese last touched upon in The Last Temptation of Christ in 1988, in which Jesus sees a future of peace and ordinary comfort.

Silence is a drama about Christian martyrdom, and like all such films,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Silence’: Will Academy Voters Embrace Martin Scorsese’s Passion Project?

‘Silence’: Will Academy Voters Embrace Martin Scorsese’s Passion Project?
Early Sunday afternoon, “Silence” star Issei Ogata came close to taking the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn.’s supporting actor prize for his work in Martin Scorsese’s latest. He ultimately landed in the runner-up spot, deferring to Mahershala Ali from “Moonlight.” But a new name had been added to an already wide-open contest nevertheless.

Scorsese, meanwhile, was finally unspooling his opus for West Coast audiences. “Silence” set up shop first on the Paramount lot and later at the Fox Bruin movie palace in Westwood, packing in audiences of guild members, Academy voters and journalists eager to absorb the final prestige awards season offering of the season.

Did they get a home run contender?

It’s hard to say. A combination of tough subject matter and an inflated running time could make it a dicey prospect. Variety Chief Film Critic Peter Debruge batted it around with me a little in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sketch to Screen: "The Passion of Joan of Arc"

  • MUBI
Dreyer on the set. Courtesy of Dfi.Located in Glostrup, a quiet suburb of Copenhagen, the Danish Film Institute’s Archive is where a great portion of Danish film history, but also some unique prints of world cinema heritage, have entered a pleasant dormancy of minus 5°C. The mundane looking front building is at the back attached to vaults, sheltering thousands of films and film objects. Inside, there is nothing as ear-pleasing as the silence of a film archive, where the continuous and vague hum of ventilators is the closest thing to the murmur of celluloid.Mikael Braae, film historian and curator of the feature films at the Dfi, generously took me on an tour of the Archive which, after passing through freezing vaults, arrived at a huge storage room where on a temporary platform my attention is brought to a wrapped object: the editing table of the spiritual father of Danish cinema,
See full article at MUBI »
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