In early 1800s colonial Argentina, Belgrano leads a revolt against the oppressive Spanish authorities, and his poorly trained and badly equipped army inflicts a series of stunning defeats ... See full summary »

Director:

(as Albert Kelly)

Writers:

(story), | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Belgrano
...
Monica Salazar
Guido Trento ...
Monteros
...
Balcarce
...
Viceroy Cisneros
...
Saavedra
...
Lezica (as John Hopkins)
...
Salazar
...
Mariana
...
Aunt Rosita
Jack Ponder ...
George Gordon
...
Gómez
...
Moreno
...
Goyenecha
...
Balcarce's Father
Edit

Storyline

In early 1800s colonial Argentina, Belgrano leads a revolt against the oppressive Spanish authorities, and his poorly trained and badly equipped army inflicts a series of stunning defeats on the superior Spanish and loyalist forces. Monica, Belgrano's sweetheart, is the daughter of a prominent loyalist but is also a spy for Belgrano, sending him valuable information until she is caught and sentenced to be beheaded. Belgrano must gather his forces to rescue Monica before she goes under the headsman's axe. Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

16 September 1928 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Charge of the Gauchos  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Prints of this film were found in 2013. See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
An extremely important lost movie that must be found
2 June 2005 | by (Chelsea, MA) – See all my reviews

This is a unique film in the history of Hollywood and the Argentinean film. The fact that it is also a lost film is also a painful frustration. For the first and only time, a Hollywood studio production was actually financed, supervised and produced by an Argentinean producer, Julián Ajuria.

In the USA, FBO Pictures (which was becoming RKO Radio Pictures), virtually dismissed it as a programmer, reediting it and it was exhibited without success at the beginning of the sound film revolution. But this film was specifically intended for Argentinean audiences and in South America this film became the most financially successful of all of the silent films ever released.

While it was on production, the film was dismissed as a Hollywoodized view of the Argentinean history. The perception changed once the press, historians and politicians were able to see the film before its release.

Director Albert Kelly was an unknown, and probably a traffic officer under the watchful eye of Julián Ajuria. A lot of money was put in the picture in terms of authentic historical reconstruction of the Argentina of 1810 and the camera-work by George Benoit (who directed "Juan sin ropa" in Buenos Aires nine years ago) and Nicholas Musuraca was unquestionably excellent.

It's premiere was quite an event and those who were able to see this film never forgot it and always wanted to see it again. The last time that this film was officially exhibited was in 1939, then it vanished.

That was a sad thing for a film that several institutions, not related to films, tried to preserve. Today, only stills and descriptions of certain scenes that were published by the contemporary papers have survived.

Francis X. Bushman, as Manuel Belgrano, probably gave a performance of a lifetime. The fact that this is a silent film was a major advantage since when later Argentinean producers attempted epic historical reconstructions failed for the most part. The absence of sound unquestionably helped when the actors have to deliver important speeches. Bushman managed to embody Manuel Belgrano to perfection even in the surviving stills.

By the time of its release in 1928 Francis X. Bushman was no longer an important star. Had this film survived he might be honored in Argentina.

The fact that "Una nueva y gloriosa nación" (a title lifted from the original version of the Argentinean National Anthem) is a big frustration. But its importance in the development and encouragement of the Argentinean film industry will never be denied.

This film should be available again.


5 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?