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Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans
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Sunrise (1927) More at IMDbPro »Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (original title)


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

10 items from 2015


Nosferatu Remake In Development

28 July 2015 1:11 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Count Orlok's body looks to once again rise out of the coffin, as a remake of F.W. Murnau's masterful 1922 silent film, Nosferatu, is in the works at Studio 8 with The Witch director at the helm.

Variety reports that Robert Eggers—writer and director of this year's Sundance hit The Witch—is set to pen and helm the remake of Nosferatu, one of the most highly regarded horror films in history that's still effectively eerie to this day. The remake is currently untitled. Producing the Studio 8 project are Jay Van Hoy and Lars Knudsen’s Parts and Labor.

Based in part on Bram Stoker's classic novel, Dracula, F.W. Murnau's Nosferatu debuted in 1922 and centered on the night-stalking Count Orlok and his unfortunate victims. In 1979, Werner Herzog's Nosferatu the Vampyre—an homage to Murnau's masterpiece—was released.

For those unfamiliar with the original Nosferatu film, we have its synopsis and Blu-ray trailer below. »

- Derek Anderson

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Daily | Welles, Doctorow, Ai Weiwei

22 July 2015 5:05 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Whatever you think of the results of the poll of critics the BBC's conducted to come up with its list of the "100 greatest American films," we can surely all agree that we're glad to have the notes on the top 25: Glenn Kenny, for example, on #1, Orson Welles's Citizen Kane, Stephanie Zacharek on #2, Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather, Ali Arikan on #4, Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, Bilge Ebiri on #6, F.W. Murnau's Sunrise, Molly Haskell on #11, Welles's The Magnificent Ambersons, Jonathan Rosenbaum on #18, Charles Chaplin's City Lights and so on. Also today: Ai Weiwei gets his passport back; remembering E.L. Doctorow—and more. » - David Hudson »

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'Citizen Kane' Tops BBC's List of "100 Greatest American Films", Where Does Your Favorite Landc

21 July 2015 11:46 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Leave it to the Brits to compile a list of the best American films of all-time. BBC Culture has published a list of what it calls "The 100 Greatest American Films", as selected by 62 international film critics in order to "get a global perspective on American film." As BBC Culture notes, the critics polled represent a combination of broadcasters, book authors and reviewers at various newspapers and magazines across the world. As for what makes an American filmc "Any movie that received funding from a U.S. source," BBC Culture's publication states, which is to say the terminology was quite loose, but the list contains a majority of the staples you'd expect to see. Citizen Kane -- what elsec -- comes in at #1, and in typical fashion The Godfather follows at #2. Vertigo, which in 2012 topped Sight & Sound's list of the greatest films of all-time, comes in at #3 on BBC Culture's list. »

- Jordan Benesh

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‘Nosferatu’ Director F.W. Murnau’s Head Reportedly Stolen From Grave

14 July 2015 1:58 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

German news outlets are reporting that the head of “Nosferatu” director F.W. Murnau has been stolen from his family plot in a cemetery in Stahnsdorf, Germany. The filmmaker of the early silent vampire movie, recognized as one of the scariest horror movies of all time, died in 1931.

In a story reminiscent of one of his own movies, grave robbers opened a metal coffin to access the filmmaker’s embalmed body, said the newspaper. Stahnsdorf is about 12 miles southwest of central Berlin. The nearby graves of his two brothers were not disturbed. Spiegel Online said some wax residue had been found near the grave, pointing to a possible occult connection.

Released in 1922, “Nosferatu” was an unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker’s novel “Dracula.” Murnau worked in Hollywood for several years, directing “Sunrise,” which won several Oscars at the first Academy Awards. He died in a car crash near Santa Barbara but »

- Pat Saperstein

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‘Attack on Titan’, Sion Sono, ‘Cop Car’ among full Fantasia ’15 lineup

7 July 2015 8:47 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The 19th Annual Fantasia Film Festival is only a week away, beginning July 14 and running through August 4. And as promised for today, they’ve revealed their full line-up of films screening at 2015’s festival in Montreal.

This year’s line-up boasts 22 World Premieres, 13 International Premieres, and 21 North American Premieres. Both Marvel’s Ant-Man and the animated Miss Hokusai were previously announced, but now they’ve added the much anticipated Attack on Titan movie as their closing night film. Other highlights include the Sundance darlings Cooties, starring Elijah Wood and Rainn WilsonCop Car, starring Kevin Bacon and directed by the upcoming Spider-man director Jon Watts, and a trio of films from horror auteur Sion Sono.

See the full line-up announcement of films below via Fantasia’s Facebook page, and be sure to check out their website at fantasiafestival.com for additional information.

****

Fantasia 2015:

36 Countries, 135 Features, and Nearly 300 Short Films

- Including 22 World Premieres, »

- Brian Welk

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Jim Jarmusch's 10 Favorite Films

10 June 2015 9:40 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Jim Jarmusch, progenitor of quiet, low-key, talky indies you almost never see today (except from him), shares his ten favorite movies (hat tip: Open Culture). The iconic American indie still makes movies in black-and-white, which is reflected in his love of Ozu, Bresson, Griffith and most everybody on this list, a near-perfect menagerie of genres and styles, Euro art movies and American classics. 1. "L’Atalante" (1934, Jean Vigo) 2. "Tokyo Story" (1953, Yasujiro Ozu) 3. "They Live by Night" (1949, Nicholas Ray) 4. "Bob le Flambeur" (1955, Jean-Pierre Melville) 5. "Sunrise" (1927, F.W. Murnau) 6. "The Cameraman" (1928, Buster Keaton/Edward Sedgwick) 7. "Mouchette" (1967, Robert Bresson) 8. "Seven Samurai" (1954, Akira Kurosawa) 9. "Broken Blossoms" (1919, D.W. Griffith) 10. "Rome, Open City" (1945, Roberto Rossellini) Read More: Toh! Ranks the Films of Jim Jarmusch »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Nicolas Cage: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

6 May 2015 3:03 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

It was August, 2005. I knocked on the double door at the Four Seasons. It opened almost immediately. "Hi, I'm Nic," he said, hand outstretched. Nicolas Cage wasn't who I expected him to be. Like all actors, he was smaller and trimmer in person than he appeared on-screen. Neatly dressed in an Armani suit, Cage also displayed none of the manic fervor in real life as had become his signature on-screen. He was thoughtful, well-spoken and incredibly literate in all seven arts. It's an infrequent experience that you leave an interview feeling you've just met someone that you could hang out with regularly, but I got that with Nic Cage, in spades. He was endlessly fascinating, but also kind of a regular guy. Another of my favorite chats I count myself lucky to have been part of.

Nicolas Cage: Lord Of The Nerds

By

Alex Simon

It’s an inevitable »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Critics Debate the Best and Worst of the Oscars

23 February 2015 3:38 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Three Variety critics agree to disagree about Oscar winners and losers both onscreen and on the Dolby stage.

Peter Debruge: Last year, the Academy made a statement in giving the best picture award to “12 Years a Slave.” This time around, over the course of a spread-the-wealth evening, it was the winners’ turn to speak their minds, and they did so in force, using Hollywood’s prom as a podium to demand equal rights — for women (“Boyhood’s” only winner, Patricia Arquette), for African-Americans (Common and John Legend, accepting “Selma’s” only win), for gays (“The Imitation Game” writer Graham Moore, urging young Lgbt viewers to “stay weird, stay different” as he collected the film’s lone statue), for those with disabilities (both Julianne Moore and Eddie Redmayne turned the spotlight on talents who achieved while coping with Als), and for immigrants (Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, offering a plea on behalf of »

- Peter Debruge, Justin Chang and Scott Foundas

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'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win

22 February 2015 7:29 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

By winning the Best Cinematography Oscar for a second year in a row, "Birdman" director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki has joined a truly elite club whose ranks haven't been breached in nearly two decades. Only four other cinematographers have won the prize in two consecutive years. The last time it happened was in 1994 and 1995, when John Toll won for Edward Zwick's "Legends of the Fall" and Mel Gibson's "Braveheart" respectively. Before that you have to go all the way back to the late '40s, when Winton Hoch won in 1948 (Victor Fleming's "Joan of Arc" with Ingrid Bergman) and 1949 (John Ford's western "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"). Both victories came in the color category, as the Academy awarded prizes separately for black-and-white and color photography from 1939 to 1956. Leon Shamroy also won back-to-back color cinematography Oscars, for Henry King's 1944 Woodrow Wilson biopic "Wilson" and John M. Stahl »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Cinematographers pick the best-shot films of all time

4 February 2015 12:31 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Stumbling across that list of best-edited films yesterday had me assuming that there might be other nuggets like that out there, and sure enough, there is American Cinematographer's poll of the American Society of Cinematographers membership for the best-shot films ever, which I do recall hearing about at the time. But they did things a little differently. Basically, in 1998, cinematographers were asked for their top picks in two eras: films from 1894-1949 (or the dawn of cinema through the classic era), and then 1950-1997, for a top 50 in each case. Then they followed up 10 years later with another poll focused on the films between 1998 and 2008. Unlike the editors' list, though, ties run absolutely rampant here and allow for way more than 50 films in each era to be cited. I'd love to see what these lists would look like combined, however. I imagine "Citizen Kane," which was on top of the 1894-1949 list, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

10 items from 2015


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