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Sunrise (1927) More at IMDbPro »Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (original title)


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

14 items from 2014


The 50 Definitive Relationship Dramas: 10-1

1 December 2014 5:16 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

10. Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948)

Directed by: Max Ophuls

To be honest, the relationship at the center of “Letter from an Unknown Woman” barely even exists. It’s more of a longing from one side than the other. But the ways Ophuls structures the film qualifies it for this list. For the run of the story, we hear a voiceover, explaining the moments in these two characters’ lives. Lisa (Joan Fontaine) is a teenager who becomes obsessed with a pianist who lives in her building named Stefan (Louis Jordan). She only meets him once, but maintains her love for him. After her mother announces they will be moving, Lisa runs away, but sees Stefan with another woman. Lisa becomes a respectable woman and is proposed to by a young, family-focused military officer, whom she turns down, still in love with Stefan, a man she has barely met. Years later, she »

- Joshua Gaul

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The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari | Blu-ray Review

25 November 2014 8:30 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Kino Classics refurbishes Robert Weine’s 1920 landmark title The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, the film that marked the birth of German Expressionism as well as the flagship of the horror film genre. Tempered by bookends meant to diminish interpretations of parallelism between insanity and authority, its stark, jagged angles and ingenious uses of shadows predates the dark beauty of film noir, featuring fantastic set designs that still rival the ability of contemporary film. Eerie, carnivalesque, and as arresting as ever, it’s a title worthy of this remastered revisit.

The story of Caligari, developed by Carl Mayer (responsible for Murnau’s Sunrise and The Last Laugh) and Hans Janowitz, is incredibly simple. Basically, the eponymous doctor happens to have control of a sleepwalker that does nefarious deeds for his master, namely murdering inhabitants of the small hamlet late at night. There is a slight twist to the proceedings, though it »

- Nicholas Bell

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First Best Actress and Best Actor Academy Award Winners Tonight

17 November 2014 5:12 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

First Best Actor Oscar winner Emil Jannings and first Best Actress Oscar winner Janet Gaynor on TCM (photo: Emil Jannings in 'The Last Command') First Best Actor Academy Award winner Emil Jannings in The Last Command, first Best Actress Academy Award winner Janet Gaynor in Sunrise, and sisters Norma Talmadge and Constance Talmadge are a few of the silent era performers featured this evening on Turner Classic Movies, as TCM continues with its Silent Monday presentations. Starting at 5 p.m. Pt / 8 p.m. Et on November 17, 2014, get ready to check out several of the biggest movie stars of the 1920s. Following the Jean Negulesco-directed 1943 musical short Hit Parade of the Gay Nineties -- believe me, even the most rabid anti-gay bigot will be able to enjoy this one -- TCM will be showing Josef von Sternberg's The Last Command (1928) one of the two movies that earned »

- Andre Soares

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‘Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans’: A Marriage of Light

2 November 2014 6:00 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927), as in other works of F.W. Murnau and the German Expressionist movement, is a style of emotions triggered in service of light where the relationship between Movement-Image is also the same between Image-Light. The intensity of light and its relationship to form thrust Expressionistic ideas into a new era and few films exemplified this more beautifully than Sunrise. The intensity of light is measured in proportions of black versus white and brightness versus darkness. Each frame of the film becomes a physical object, an exploration of this gradation. Each frame explores the full spectrum of the gray scale, passing from the darkest shadows to a white light, evoking a true sense of the chiaroscuro. In each frame, light, framing and blocking leans towards a tendency to split the visual image along a diagonal or dentale line (See Picture 1 and 2). This visual idea communicates an idea of a rift, »

- Francisco Peres

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See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

2 September 2014 12:56 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s »

- Brian Welk

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Rerelease: Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari Review

29 August 2014 4:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

As the spindly figure of Cesare ambles along with a damsel in distress slung over his shoulder, hunted by the law on a pathway that defies all architectural sense, a few things are being born into the popular cinema vernacular. Not only do you realise that this is Expressionism functioning at its highest, but you get the feeling that every psychological thriller, gothic fable and crime noir is being formed in an early, embryonic state, over the course of a mere seventy-seven minutes.

Sitting on a bench, a man by the name of Francis relates a tale to an elderly companion. It’s a tale of woe, of murder, of foreboding horror; cutting back in time to the town of Holstenwall, an ominous new attraction rolls into the annual fair – with an even more ominous figure at the helm. Dr. Caligari presents Cesare the Somnambulist, a sleepwalking near-zombie who can »

- Gary Green

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An Entertaining and Brief 'Detour' Down a Dark Highway

28 August 2014 1:00 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

After watching (and writing about) Out of the Past earlier this week, I had an itch to watch a little more film noir. So, last night, before bed, I started doing a little searching and decided on Edgar G. Ulmer's 67-minute feature Detour starring Tom Neal and Ann Savage. It should be said, before Ulmer started directing films he worked in the art department as set designer on Fritz Lang's Metroplis and M as well as assistant art director on F.W. Murnau's silent classic Sunrise. We've also featured a previous film of his here on this site when Matt Risnes wrote about his 1934 classic Black Cat (read that here) a spectacularly dark and eerie feature featuring Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi, each of them chewing up the big screen, attempting to outdo one another. That aside, when it comes to Detour, like Out of the Past we're talking about another femme fatale, »

- Brad Brevet

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Witness Filmmaking's "Sunrise"

4 June 2014 10:54 AM, PDT | JustPressPlay.net | See recent JustPressPlay news »

F.W. Murnau’s 1927 drama Sunrise has the distinction of winning “Best Unique and Artistic Production” at the first-ever Academy Awards ceremony in 1929, which at the time was deemed just as prestigious of an honor as winning “Outstanding Picture” (which, at that ceremony, was given to the film Wings). It is also the only film to ever win that award, as the Academy soon changed its mind and decided that one best, outstanding picture was quite enough, thank you very much, discontinuing that specific honor. Yet Sunrise has maintained its place in cinematic history even as the award it was honored with has faded into nonexistence. Its story is the epitome of silent-era melodrama and occasionally elicits more laughter than one can imagine was intended, but as a prime example of early advances in the art of filmmaking, it is most definitely worth watching.

Read more...

»

- Lee Jutton

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Our Daily Bread #5

17 March 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The Moon, the opposite of the sun, hovers over us by night, the opposite of day. 

In F.W. Murnau’s Tabu (1931), Reri, the sacred maiden of the small island of Bora Bora, writes this to her lover Matahi: 

And indeed, when Matahi chases after her, the moon spreads its path on the sea.

He runs and swims after her, moving faster than a normal human being, defying the laws of gravity. 

Miraculously, he catches up to the boat. 

Thus, he must die, sinking back into a void…

…while ghost ships linger on in the distance…

…carrying another hopeless romantic, and a moving corpse—A second Nosferatu.

The moon is absent in Murnau’s earlier film, made nearly ten years before Tabu, but it is in the one he made nearly five years after Nosferatu, when George O’Brien leaves his wife for a midnight rendezvous with another woman. 

And indeed, »

- Neil Bahadur

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Oscars: 10 Best Pictures That Actually Were The Best

12 February 2014 8:18 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

New Line Cinema

Next month is the 86th Academy Awards ceremony but ever since sentimental fighter pilot movie Wings beat F.W. Murnau’s still lauded Sunrise to the inaugural big prize, there has been a general feeling that the Best Picture Oscar doesn’t really represent the year’s best film at all. The Academy has a reputation for picking safe “prestige” dramas over anything original, innovative, stylised or genre films.

This is nothing new. The 14th ceremony in 1942 gave the top award to worthy Americanised Welsh mine drama How Green Was My Valley, despite the other nominees including the hugely innovative and influential (not to mention far more entertaining) Maltese Falcon and Citizen Kane.

In the 84 Oscar ceremonies between Wings’ first win and the triumph of 12 Years a Slave, Gravity or The Wolf of Wall Street this year, there have been bafflingly undeserved winners (Driving Miss Daisy in 1990), good »

- Jack Gann

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Sunrise Blu-ray Review

29 January 2014 9:21 AM, PST | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Most people these days know F.W. Murnau for his silent classic Nosferatu, but many have argued that his best work came after he emigrated to America and went to work for Fox. Specifically, Sunrise: a romantic melodrama concerning love lost and found, stands as perhaps the greatest cinematic expression of the Silent Era, and remains a treat not only for film buffs but for anyone interested in strong storytelling. Fox has just released a new Blu-ray edition of the film, and while it's not the Criterion Collection, it should prove more than enticing for fans and casual viewers alike. Hit the jump for my full review. Among its other notable aspects, Sunrise was one of the first movies to use an integrated soundtrack, though it remained dialogue-free and only music and audio effects were included on the film. In many ways, that's a selling point, since its haunting narrative needs no further embellishment. »

- Rob Vaux

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New on Video – ‘Sunrise’

16 January 2014 9:05 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Sunrise

Scenario by Carl Mayer, from an original theme by Hermann Sudermann

Directed by F.W. Murnau

USA, 1927

William Fox had seen Faust, Nosferatu, and The Last Laugh, and on the basis of these German masterworks, he brought their creator, F.W. Murnau, to Hollywood. What he got was a truly distinct cinematic vision, which was what he had in mind: something to set a few Fox features apart from the other studios’ output. What he probably didn’t expect was just how much of that “artsy” European touch he was going to get with Murnau on contract. Were American audiences going to go for this type of movie, with its symbolism, melodious structure, and overtly self-conscious style? At any rate, Murnau’s first picture at Fox was one to remember. Sunrise, from 1927, is one of the greatest of all films. It is a touching, beautiful, and artistically accomplished movie, one of the best ever made, »

- Jeremy Carr

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What to Watch: Jan. 14-27, 2014

14 January 2014 2:29 PM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

We’re breaking form this week and going alphabetical instead of preference order because of the Incredible diversity of product available for you to rent, buy, or stream over the next ten days. How does someone really compare “Sunrise” to “You’re Next”? Why bother?

If you need to know, “Closed Circuit” and “Runner Runner” aren’t really worth your time and “A.C.O.D.” and “Riddick” are flawed but everything else in here comes with varying degrees of recommendation, particularly the quiet beauty of “Sunrise” and the incredible charm of “Enough Said”. We’re also loading you up since we’ll be off next week seeing flicks in Park City at the Sundance Film Festival. There’s plenty in here to tide you over. Pick your favorites.

20 Feet From Stardom

Photo credit: The Weinstein Company

“20 Feet From Stardom”

One of the most crowd-pleasing documentaries in years is likely to find an »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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'Fruitvale', 'Riddick', 'Thief', 'Rififi' and More on DVD and Blu-ray This Week

14 January 2014 7:04 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Short Term 12 One of my top ten movies of 2013, Short Term 12 was a movie that surprised me with its honesty as well as writer/director Destin Cretton's ability to turn a cliched moment into an authentic one. It's a film filled with passion, disappointment, love and humor. You know, sorta like life. I urge you to check it out.

Fruitvale Station A heavy contender for my top ten movies of 2013, on another day, perhaps Fruitvale Station actually makes it into my top ten. From the feature writing and directorial debut of Ryan Coogler to the performances from Michael B. Jordan, Melonie Diaz and Octavia Spencer, this is a film that deserves recognition, but it unfortunately won't receive anywhere near as much as it deserves.

Rififi (Criterion Collection) I will have my review of this one online shortly, but until then know this Blu-ray looks great, far better than the previous DVD release. »

- Brad Brevet

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

14 items from 2014


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