Andy Barden, Edna Jordan, and Dan Murdock are the three claimants to the valuable mine of the late Abner Ferrige. Edna takes possession but Murdock gets her to leave and while the three are... See full summary »

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(as Reeves Eason)

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(adaptation), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Barbara Worth ...
Edna Jordan
Charles Sellon ...
Pop Wingate
Rosa Gore ...
Aunt Hattie
Albert Prisco ...
Dan Murdock
Robert Homans ...
Jim Gardener (as Robert E. Homans)
...
Ramon Fernandez
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Storyline

Andy Barden, Edna Jordan, and Dan Murdock are the three claimants to the valuable mine of the late Abner Ferrige. Edna takes possession but Murdock gets her to leave and while the three are away his men take possession. But when the Lawyer arrives to announce that Ferrige never filed, everyone rushes off to be the first at the claims office. Written by Maurice VanAuken <mvanauken@a1access.net>

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Genres:

Western

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Release Date:

15 May 1927 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Le Roi de la Prairie  »

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1.33 : 1
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A Bit of Everything
30 June 2004 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

Another of the terrific comedies that Hoot Gibson starred in for Universal before they dropped his contract in a panic at the dawn of the sound era -- I suppose as he wasn't a relative of Carl Laemmle, it was ok. this one shows Hoot displaying his easy-going charm as he and two other claimants compete for a valuable gold mine. There are a couple of brilliantly composed scenes, particularly the Mexican fiesta that turns into a duel, but it all comes down to good writing and Hoot Gibson's star power, and it delivers.

Some of the joke may be considered offensive today, although given who utters them -- vile, despicable claim jumpers -- jokes that the gold vein is so deep that "It goes to the roots of the chop suey tree" can be viewed as in character. Besides, standards of decency have not universally risen -- there are no bullet-ridden corpses oozing sticky blood here. What use is a movie without people oozing blood? Well, there are a few laughs, a plot that makes some sense an some good thrills here that don't involve computer faking. Take a look.


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