The Jazz Singer
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2003

14 items from 2015


Grandiose Christian Epic Became Biggest Worldwide Box Office Hit Until Gwtw

21 December 2015 3:51 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ramon Novarro: 'Ben-Hur' 1925 star. 'Ben-Hur' on TCM: Ramon Novarro in most satisfying version of the semi-biblical epic Christmas 2015 is just around the corner. That's surely the reason Turner Classic Movies presented Fred Niblo's Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ last night, Dec. 20, '15, featuring Carl Davis' magnificent score. Starring Ramon Novarro, the 1925 version of Ben-Hur became not only the most expensive movie production,[1] but also the biggest worldwide box office hit up to that time.[2] Equally important, that was probably the first instance when the international market came to the rescue of a Hollywood mega-production,[3] saving not only Ben-Hur from a fate worse than getting trampled by a runaway chariot, but also the newly formed Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, which could have been financially strangled at birth had the epic based on Gen. Lew Wallace's bestseller been a commercial bomb. The convoluted making of 'Ben-Hur,' as described »

- Andre Soares

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Vittorio Storaro Talks Frame Rates, Experimentation, and Why Italians Do It Best

30 November 2015 9:14 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Vittorio Storaro, like fellow Apocalypse Now veteran Walter Murch, knows more about his field than nearly anybody. And, as with Murch, the cinematographer’s reasons for being at this year’s Camerimage International Film Festival were almost irrelevant — for me, at least, when the opportunity to interview such a master of the craft is offered. But he was present for a project that means a good deal to him: Muhammad: The Messenger of God, an Iranian religious epic, the first in a prospective trilogy, and, to honor Storaro and director Majid Majidi, recipient of the festival’s Outstanding Cinematic Duo Award.

I don’t know if you could necessarily talk about anything with Storaro, but the man can take any topic that interests him and run with it — for a good, long time, as the following discussion will illustrate. This is not a complaint. Those who are so well-versed in »

- Nick Newman

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Show Business is Returning to a Glitzier, Taller Hollywood

4 November 2015 11:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Hollywood — the city, not the industry — is taking a giant leap into the future. Within the next few years, the Sunset Boulevard corridor between Highland and Western avenues will be lined with an array of glassy monoliths joining the eye-catching Emerson College to create a new center for the entertainment business.

While in recent years the Oscars returned to Hollywood, and new hotels and clubs drew tourists, office development had been lagging. Now the clusters of Hollywood studio lots are about to be joined by development on an unprecedented scale — that is, if the well-heeled residents of the Hollywood Hills and other neighborhoods approve.

Next year Viacom will relocate MTV, Bet and Comedy Central to Columbia Square, a new office, residential and retail campus built around the art deco former headquarters of CBS that’s also home to NeueHouse, the brand-new invite-only social club/workspace. And BuzzFeed Motion Pictures is »

- Ted Johnson

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Show Business is Returning to a Glitzier, Taller Hollywood

4 November 2015 11:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Hollywood — the city, not the industry — is taking a giant leap into the future. Within the next few years, the Sunset Boulevard corridor between Highland and Western avenues will be lined with an array of glassy monoliths joining the eye-catching Emerson College to create a new center for the entertainment business.

While in recent years the Oscars returned to Hollywood, and new hotels and clubs drew tourists, office development had been lagging. Now the clusters of Hollywood studio lots are about to be joined by development on an unprecedented scale — that is, if the well-heeled residents of the Hollywood Hills and other neighborhoods approve.

Next year Viacom will relocate MTV, Bet and Comedy Central to Columbia Square, a new office, residential and retail campus built around the art deco former headquarters of CBS that’s also home to NeueHouse, the brand-new invite-only social club/workspace. And BuzzFeed Motion Pictures is »

- Ted Johnson

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12 Reasons 1985 Was The Most Important Movie Year Ever

21 October 2015 3:11 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

20th Century Fox

Before technological advances and audience thirst for innovation and unique creativity changed how cinematic achievements are charted, it used to be that we could chart watershed moments in easy chapters.

In 1897 the first studios were formed; 1902 saw A Trip To The Moon in colour; in 1927 sound came with The Jazz Singer… Now, everything is so grand and epic that the spectacular is normal. But that wasn’t the case in 1985, the last truly transformative film year.

If you were lucky enough to live it, it was like a series of ground-zero events that would shake cinema to its core, but because of its importance, there’s no way even the youngest ticket buying film fans could escape its legacy.

Obviously the best films of the year are important to note, but bringing up classics like Brazil, Prizzi’s Honour, Out Of Africa, Ran and The Color Purple is too easy, »

- Simon Gallagher

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19 years ago today: Superman got hitched

6 October 2015 9:30 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Today, Clark Kent and Lois Lane are celebrating their 19th wedding anniversary. It was on October 6, 1996 that Dean Cain’s Clark and Teri Hatcher’s Lois got married in an episode of “Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman.” Three days later, DC Comics released “Superman: The Wedding Album” (an issue with a cover date of December 1996). It was the first time Lois and Clark got married in the comics for realsies. Only took them 58 years. Previous weddings had ended with “it was all a dream” or the like. Here’s the TV wedding moment that aired 19 years ago. Savor that ’90s cheese. Other notable October 6 happenings in pop culture history: • 1847: “Jane Eyre” was published, at the time bearing the pseudonym Currer Bell. • 1927: The first feature-length film with synchronized dialogue, “The Jazz Singer” held its premiere in New York City, scheduled to coincide with Yom Kippur, the Jewish »

- Emily Rome

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Box Office Democracy: Hotel Transylvania 2

29 September 2015 6:58 PM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Hotel Transylvania 2 is so much better than Pixels and it’s hard to figure out exactly why. The material isn’t substantially better, it still feels like the scripts are written by an elementary school joke book come to life— although maybe for Hotel Transylvania the living book has to turn in a couple more drafts. The animated medium might open up for a few more ambitious sight gags but it isn’t like Pixels was stingy with the effects shots. Perhaps it’s that with live actors you can see how little effort they’re putting in and how much they’d rather be doing something else, and an animated character looks more engaged even if none of the voice acting is particularly ambitious. It could just be that an engaged Genndy Tartakovsky is far and away better than a Chris Columbus just out for a paycheck. Something »

- Arthur Tebbel

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C'mon feel the noise: what happened when the talkies came to Britain?

21 September 2015 5:48 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Continuing our series on early cinema, we revisit the birth of sound on film, from lurid potboilers crammed with sex and violence to Alfred Hitchcock’s earliest talkies. Plus, three British gems from the era

In November 1928, The Terror came to Britain’s cinemas, and things would never be quite the same again. The Jazz Singer had ushered in the era of sound cinema with a few scenes of synchronised dialogue and music, but The Terror, a murder mystery set in an English country house, was the real deal: the first continuous “all-talkie” to show in Europe. Many of the London critics loathed it, labelling it “so bad that it is almost suicidal”. In the Observer, CA Lejeune approached the trouble with talkies head on: “We may deplore limitations of language for the hitherto universal cinema,” she wrote in her review. “We may dread the invasion of more sound into an already rowdy world. »

- Pamela Hutchinson

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Warner Bros to expand UK studio

19 September 2015 1:54 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Hollywood giant says thousands of jobs will follow expansion of historic Hertfordshire home to blockbusters

From the first talkie, The Jazz Singer, to the Humphrey Bogart classic Casablanca, Warner Bros has produced some of cinema’s greatest masterpieces. Now the Hollywood giant is planning an ambitious expansion of its UK studio, giving a huge boost to film-making on this side of the Atlantic.

It is to invest tens of millions of pounds in its studios at Leavesden in Hertfordshire, on top of £150m that it has spent so far on the sprawling, 200-acre site. It was there that Warner Bros turned out the eight Harry Potter films, one of the most successful franchises in the history of cinema, with combined box-office takings of more than $7.7bn.

Continue reading »

- Dalya Alberge

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Do audiences want quality movies? L.A. Earthquake Flick to Pass Domestic $100M Mark Today

8 June 2015 7:24 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'San Andreas' movie with Dwayne Johnson. 'San Andreas' movie box office: $100 million domestic milestone today As the old saying (sort of) goes: If you build it, they will come. Warner Bros. built a gigantic video game, called it San Andreas, and They have come to check out Dwayne Johnson perform miraculous deeds not seen since ... George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road, released two weeks earlier. Embraced by moviegoers, hungry for quality, original storylines and well-delineated characters – and with the assistance of 3D surcharges – the San Andreas movie debuted with $54.58 million from 3,777 theaters on its first weekend out (May 29-31) in North America. Down a perfectly acceptable 52 percent on its second weekend (June 5-7), the special effects-laden actioner collected an extra $25.83 million, trailing only the Melissa McCarthy-Jason Statham comedy Spy, (with $29.08 million) as found at Box Office Mojo.* And that's how this original movie – it's not officially a remake, »

- Zac Gille

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New on Video: Silent Discoveries – ‘After Six Days’ & ‘Yesterday and Today’

23 February 2015 5:29 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

From Vci Entertainment comes the odd and only moderately interesting Silent Discoveries double feature, containing After Six Days, a 62-minute 1920 Biblical epic, and Yesterday and Today, a nearly hour-long 1953 documentary. As noted by Vci, the former was “Touted at the time as a ‘$3,000,000 Entertainment for the Hundred Millions,'” and this edition was made from the only complete copy known to exist, a mint 16mm print of the 1929 7-reel sound reissue. The second title here features actor, comedian, and famous vaudevillian George Jessel as he hosts a random assortment of clips from early silent film releases, most of which were, and are, rarely otherwise seen. Neither portion is particularly good, or even consistently entertaining, but both—and this is the reason the DVD is worthwhile—are unique and scarce, and are therefore significant entries into the growing library of archived films made available for mass consumption.

To start with After Six Days, »

- Jeremy Carr

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Top Tunes: The 10 greatest songs to win an Oscar

20 February 2015 2:49 PM, PST | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

It’s been 80 years since the Academy handed out the first ever Oscar for Best Original Song and those eight decades have provided the widest possible array of winning numbers.

Six years following the all-silent first Oscar ceremony, musicians were given their chance to win Oscars of their very own. The in-between years saw the roar of The Jazz Singer open the floodgates to the movie musical, culminating in the set-pieces typified by the inaugural Best Song winner, “The Continental” from the Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire vehicle The Gay Divorcee.

However, as the years rolled on different musical styles took their turn providing Oscar’s top tune as well as some songs that emerged from the unlikeliest of films to capture the imagination.

Here is a list of the top 10 Best Song recipients in Oscar history. Please note that these are not necessarily the best stand-alone songs, but a »

- Shane McNeil

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Greenaway talks new film Walking To Paris

22 January 2015 4:06 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

British director will premiere Eisenstein in Guanajuato at the Berlinale next month.

Prolific British auteur Peter Greenaway, whose new film Eisenstein in Guanajuato is set to premiere in competition at the Berlinale next month, is about to start work on new feature Walking To Paris.

The biopic of sculptor Constantin Brancusi is being made with Dutch producer and former Rotterdam festival stalwart Kees Kasander.

The film will focus on the 18 months when a 27-year-old Brancusi walked through Romania, Hungary, Austria, Germany, Switzerland and France.

Speaking to Screen about the feature, Greenaway said: “Along the way, living off the land as his years of being a shepherd boy had taught him, he had adventures - comic, violent, sexual and romantic - and certainly formative of his future sculpture, constantly building sculptures out of found materials – wood, stone, sand, snow and ice - leaving a trail of abandoned experimental temporary sculptures across the landscapes of Europe.”

The film is »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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50 Greatest Musical Numbers In Film History

3 January 2015 4:34 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

20th Century Fox

Ever since The Jazz Singer came out and made the notion of movie musicals a reality, they’ve been one of the most enduring genres in Hollywood. Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly, Judy Garland: some of the most iconic pop culture figures are performers who became famous after appearing in movie musicals. And it’s interesting to note that the genre is always evolving, always changing to reflect the needs of audiences. In the 1930s, for example, musicals flourished, featuring opulent, glamorous set pieces with men in tails and women in fancy dresses, all done in an attempt to make audiences forget about the dreary realities of the Great Depression.

As time went on and tastes changed, musicals have kept up with the pace. Once filmmakers became experienced with how to make a movie musical, they started experimenting and trying new things. Thus, musicals that have been »

- Audrey Fox

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2003

14 items from 2015


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