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The Jazz Singer (1927)

Unrated | | Drama, Music, Musical | 6 October 1927 (USA)
The son of a Jewish Cantor must defy the traditions of his religious father in order to pursue his dream of becoming a jazz singer.

Director:

Writers:

(play), (adaptation) | 1 more credit »
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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 2 wins. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Robert Gordon ...
Jakie Rabinowitz - Age 13 (as Bobby Gordon)
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Yossele Rosenblatt ...
Cantor Rosenblatt - Concert Recital (as Cantor Joseff Rosenblatt)
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Storyline

Cantor Rabinowitz is concerned and upset because his son Jakie shows so little interest in carrying on the family's traditions and heritage. For five generations, men in the family have been cantors in the synagogue, but Jakie is more interested in jazz and ragtime music. One day, they have such a bitter argument that Jakie leaves home for good. After a few years on his own, now calling himself Jack Robin, he gets an important opportunity through the help of well-known stage performer Mary Dale. But Jakie finds that in order to balance his career, his relationship with Mary, and his memories of his family, he will be forced to make some difficult choices. Written by Snow Leopard

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Biggest Thrill You Ever Had in Your Life! See more »


Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

6 October 1927 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Der Jazzsänger  »

Box Office

Budget:

$422,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$3,000,000 (USA)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Vitaphone)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Al Jolson's famous line (as Jack Robin) "You ain't heard nothin' yet." was an ad-lib. The intention was that the film should only have synchronized music, not speech, but Jolson dropped in the line (which he used in his stage act) after the song "Dirty Hands, Dirty Face". The director wisely left it in. See more »

Goofs

Before the dress rehearsal "Jakie" applies black face and he misses a portion on the upper right forehead. He dons the wig which covers the white spot. After he returns from the dress rehearsal and removes the wig, there is no white spot. It is covered with black face. See more »

Quotes

[opening lines, first quote and first words in the first widely-seen talking picture]
Jack Robin: Wait a minute, wait a minute, you ain't heard nothin' yet! Wait a minute, I tell ya! You ain't heard nothin'! You wanna hear "Toot, Toot, Tootsie"? All right, hold on, hold on...
[then he walks back to one of the band members]
Jack Robin: Lou, listen. Play "Toot, Toot, Tootsie", three chorus, you understand. In the third chorus, I whistle. Now give it to 'em hard and heavy, go right ahead.
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Connections

Featured in The 71st Annual Academy Awards (1999) See more »

Soundtracks

Kol Nidre
(uncredited)
Traditional
Sung by Warner Oland (dubbed by Joseph Diskay)
Also sung later by Al Jolson
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Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Four Angels, Poised
10 February 2007 | by (Virginia Beach) – See all my reviews

There's not much to say about this other than even today, for this viewer, it is emotionally effective. Yes you know you are being manipulated. Yes, the acting conventions of the silent screen are comically exaggerated. Yes, it is shameless in setting up the ultimate choice. But this is so well structured that even today it escapes cliché. That's so remarkable, because big movies are almost always turned into clichés as bits of them are digested and continuously re-served to us as our visual grammar.

The love interest here is so unusual. He does fall in love with a pretty dancer, but tells her plainly that his career is more important than she is. She later doesn't become part of the choice — as would be the case in nearly every other script — instead she becomes part of the audience, presenting the dramatic quandary: the stage or God.

The presentation of religion is unique in my experience. Everyone here is a Jew, except the performers. They are the "real" and everyone else is "pretend," performing. Though there are many opportunities to fall into obnoxious stereotypes, its avoided over and over. That's despite the dozens of examples they had before.

In fact, there's an amazing engineering of story here. As any viewer will know, this was the first talkie. It was new, and to emphasize its newness a story was created to emphasize the contrast between old and new.

This film is part silent, part "talkie." It shows a struggle between the old (obviously obsolete) and the vital young. It also depicts in a rather subtle but effective way the "old" god, and the new: there's plenty of talk about the performance hall being a modern church. The music as well: we have the implication that it is not only the setting, the performer and the calling, but the music itself that is something new.

Along the way we get street scenes of the Jewish area of New York. These are genuine street scenes and are absolutely phenomenal: there isn't anything I know that compares. There was an attempt of sorts in "The Pawnbroker," which by itself was strong. But nothing compared to this.

Ted's Evaluation -- 4 of 3: Every cineliterate person should experience this.


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