Moana (1926) - News Poster

(1926)

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New to Streaming: ‘Carrie,’ ‘Wonder Woman,’ ‘It Comes at Night,’ ‘Bottle Rocket,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Bottle Rocket (Wes Anderson)

Wes Anderson’s feature debut, the slyly comedic Bottle Rocket, positions its heroes, three young wannabe criminals with an eye for small-scale robberies, as blind innocents, lost in the unfamiliar world of adulthood. As part of his 75-year plan, Dignan (Owen Wilson) forms a gang, consisting of himself, Anthony (Luke Wilson) who’s fresh out of a voluntary psychiatric hospital, and Bob (Robert Musgrave) who
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Beautiful Lies of Robert J. Flaherty’s "Moana with Sound"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Robert Flaherty's Moana with Sound (1926 / 1980) is playing August 30 - September 29, 2017 on Mubi in most countries around the world.Slowly, slowly, the tufunga taps his comb of bone needles into the young man’s lower back. His movements are practiced and precise, each tap marking the young man for the rest of his days. The young man winces in agony, sweat pouring down his face as his relatives wipe away the blood and excess ink with tapa cloth. A witch-woman stokes a fire and burns candlenut stalks to make more soot for the tufunga’s ink. The infernal tapping continues, now on his upper back, now on his flanks, now on his knees—the most painful part of the ceremony. Outside the hut, a crowd of men dance and sing. “Courage to Moana,” they cry, “Courage to Moana!
See full article at MUBI »

12 Mind-Blowing Documentaries With 100% On Rotten Tomatoes

Icarus Films

While many still view the documentary as the ugly stepsister of the glamorous feature picture, the truth is that non-fiction has played an important part in the development of film, being just about as old as the art itself. The term itself was coined some 90 years ago by young Scottish academic John Grierson during his review of Robert Flaherty’s 1926 ethnographic piece Moana, a film funded by Paramount Pictures that aimed to document the traditional lives of the Polynesians.

Pioneer Soviet filmmaker Dziga Vertov developed the genre further with his experimental work in the late 20s and beyond, though the documentary would be taken in a different direction entirely during the 1930s and 40s, used as a war-time tool rather than a means of education or entertainment. It wasn’t until the 1960s that a new generation of young filmmakers in the Us and Europe took steps to
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Out 1,’ Noir, Akerman, ‘Strange Days,’ ‘Johnny Guitar’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

BAMcinématek

This is the final weekend for marathon screenings of Out 1. We highly recommend taking the plunge.

Museum of the Moving Image

“Lonely Places: Film Noir and the American Landscape” highlights a different atmosphere of the noir picture, and it makes its case with some great films. Out of the Past shows on Friday; Saturday
See full article at The Film Stage »

Film Forum to Premiere 'Nanook of the North' Director's Second Documentary Feature

Film Forum to Premiere 'Nanook of the North' Director's Second Documentary Feature
Film Forum will premiere a new restoration of 1926's "Moana with Sound," filmmaker Robert J. Flaherty's follow-up to his widely praised "Nanook of the North." Made alongside his brilliant wife, Frances Hubbard Flaherty, the two journeyed with their children to the south seas in 1923 to capture the exotic lives of the unsung Samoan people. Originally filmed without any sound (as it was nearly impossible in the early 1920's), their daughter Monica Flaherty ventured back after nearly 50 years with vérité auteur Ricky Leacock to record location sound, dialogue and folk songs to accompany her parents' moving portraiture of vanished customs destroyed by industrial modernization. "Moana with Sound," a Kino Lorber release, will play for one week only at Film Forum from November 13th-19th. Bruce Posner, who restored the film, will introduce the opening night screening (Friday, November 13) at 6 Pm. For more info, click...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Doc Talk: Is It Possible to Remake a Documentary?

  • Moviefone
Filed under: Documentaries, Columns, Cinematical

The full question: is it possible to remake a documentary as a documentary? We know, thanks to Werner Herzog and others, that you can redo a documentary's story as a dramatic feature. But let's imagine instead that the premise behind your favorite classic non-fiction film is lifted and re-applied to a new non-fiction work with the same title. 'Hoop Dreams' following a new set of high school basketballers. 'Salesman' documenting today's very different breed of door-to-door merchants (of bibles again or something else). 'The Thin Blue Line' investigating another murder. 'Primary' observing a 2012 Democratic (or Republican) primary election. 'Nanook of the North' presenting the life of the Inuit today.

Actually, 'Nanook' could simply be redone shot for shot. The original isn't exactly a document of an Eskimo of the time so much as how the people used to be,
See full article at Moviefone »

Doc Talk: Is It Possible to Remake a Documentary?

Filed under: Documentaries, Columns, Cinematical

The full question: is it possible to remake a documentary as a documentary? We know, thanks to Werner Herzog and others, that you can redo a documentary's story as a dramatic feature. But let's imagine instead that the premise behind your favorite classic non-fiction film is lifted and re-applied to a new non-fiction work with the same title. 'Hoop Dreams' following a new set of high school basketballers. 'Salesman' documenting today's very different breed of door-to-door merchants (of bibles again or something else). 'The Thin Blue Line' investigating another murder. 'Primary' observing a 2012 Democratic (or Republican) primary election. 'Nanook of the North' presenting the life of the Inuit today.

Actually, 'Nanook' could simply be redone shot for shot. The original isn't exactly a document of an Eskimo of the time so much as how the people used to be,
See full article at Cinematical »

See also

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