IMDb > Don Juan (1926)
Don Juan
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Don Juan (1926) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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Down 17% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Bess Meredyth (screen play)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Don Juan on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
19 February 1927 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The Scientific Marvel VITAPHONE Presentation FAMED OPERATIC AND MUSICAL ARTISTS...and JOHN BARRYMORE in "DON JUAN" (original poster) See more »
Plot:
Misogynistic skirt chaser Don Juan falls for a convent girl. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(11 articles)
User Reviews:
The Great Profile As The Great Seducer See more (22 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Jane Winton ... Donna Isobel
John Roche ... Leandro

Warner Oland ... Cesare Borgia

Estelle Taylor ... Lucrezia Borgia
Montagu Love ... Count Giano Donati (as Montague Love)
Josef Swickard ... Duke Della Varnese (as Joseph Swickard)
Willard Louis ... Pedrillo
Nigel De Brulier ... Marchese Rinaldo

Hedda Hopper ... Marchesia Rinaldo

Myrna Loy ... Mai - Lady in Waiting

Mary Astor ... Adriana della Varnese

John Barrymore ... Don Jose de Marana / Don Juan de Marana
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Lionel Braham ... Duke Margoni (uncredited)

Helene Costello ... Rena - Adriana's Maid (uncredited)
Helena D'Algy ... Donna Elvira (uncredited)
Yvonne Day ... Don Juan at age 5 (uncredited)

Philippe De Lacy ... Don Juan at age 10 (uncredited)
Emily Fitzroy ... The Dowager (uncredited)
John George ... Hunchback (uncredited)

Gibson Gowland ... Gentleman of Rome (uncredited)

Phyllis Haver ... Imperia (uncredited)
Sheldon Lewis ... Gentleman of Rome (uncredited)

June Marlowe ... Trusia (uncredited)
Dick Sutherland ... Gentleman of Rome (uncredited)
Gustav von Seyffertitz ... Neri - the Alchemist (uncredited)
Helen Lee Worthing ... Eleanora (uncredited)

Directed by
Alan Crosland 
 
Writing credits
Bess Meredyth (screen play)

Walter Anthony  titles (uncredited)
Lord Byron  poem (uncredited)
Maude Fulton  titles (uncredited)

Original Music by
William Axt (uncredited)
David Mendoza (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Byron Haskin (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Harold McCord (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Ben Carré (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Gordon Hollingshead .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Victor Vance .... art titles (uncredited)
A.C. Wilson .... master of properties (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Gerald W. Alexander .... sound (uncredited)
George Groves .... sound recording engineer (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Harry Redmond Sr. .... special effects supervisor (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Duke Green .... stunt double: John Barrymore (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Frank Kesson .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Melbourne Spurr .... publicity photographer (uncredited)
 
Music Department
William Axt .... music arranger (uncredited)
Maurice Baron .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Edward Bowes .... music arranger (uncredited)
Henry Hadley .... conductor (uncredited)
David Mendoza .... music arranger (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Marion Morgan .... choreographer (uncredited)
F.N. Murphy .... electrical effects (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
Spain:110 min | 112 min (Turner library print)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Vitaphone) (musical score and sound effects) | Silent
Certification:
USA:Passed (National Board of Review)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Although this was the first feature film with a Vitaphone soundtrack (therefore being the first film with a completely synchronized soundtrack), it is by no means the first sound film. The first sound film can be dated back to 1895; the process was re-discovered and improved by a French company (using a gramophone) in 1910. In 1913 Thomas A. Edison announced that all the problems of sound films were solved, and showed what he called "the first sound film." As in the earlier efforts, Nursery Favorites (1913) had a gramophone that appeared to synchronize with the film. There was one problem: the film was projected at the wrong speed, and the soundtrack was slowed down inadvertently. This problem happened all too often, and a frustrated Edison abandoned his process. In 1921 D.W. Griffith employed various experts to film a sound introduction for his film Dream Street (1921), which still exists, and the performance went off without a hitch. Griffith soon stopped using sound because he thought it was financial suicide, stating "Only 5% of the world speaks English, so why should I lose 95% of my audience?" However, by 1925 sound had arrived in the form of radio, and it was inevitable that film would follow. Movie studios tried various innovations to keep audiences coming (Technicolor, wide screen, etc.) Warner Brothers, then a lesser film company, bought the old Brooklyn-based Vitagraph Studios and its all-important network of 34 film exchanges (the film distribution network vital to each studio) in 1925 and laid out plans to become a dominant force in the film industry. Sam Warner, one of the four Warner brothers, felt the future was in sound and convinced his skeptical older brother Harry M. Warner (the money man) to throw their lot in with Western Electric's 16" disc-based recording system, forming the Vitaphone Corp. on April 20, 1926, as 70% stockholders. Oddly, Sam never envisioned the system for voice synchronization; rather, he saw it as an economical way to add the added dimension of musical accompaniment. The Vitaphone process solved the synchronization problem electro-mechanically, corresponding the projection speed with the recorded disc by utilizing the same motor for both devices. While cumbersome in both recording (editing was impossible) and play back (discs were fragile), Vitaphone represented the peak of technological innovation, albeit briefly. This film, the first Warner Bros. feature to utilize the Vitaphone process, debuted in a gala premiere on August 6th 1926 and while it was a hit, it signaled an industry format war unrivaled until the 1980s Beta vs. VHS battle. Warner's The Jazz Singer (1927) would become a monster hit 13 months later, solidly proving the public's interest in sound. But there were several sound systems then in development and none were interchangeable and the major studios like MGM and Paramount adopted a wait-and-see attitude that persisted well into 1929. The most practical, Fox's Movietone (sound on film) system, eventually won out and Warners abandoned recorded discs in 1930 but kept the Vitaphone trademark before the public into the 1940s.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: This story is set during the reign of HH Alexander VI (1492-1503); however, it features very prominently the present day Basilica of Saint Peter, whose building started during the reign of HH Julius II (1503-1513), and which was not finished until the 17th century.See more »
Quotes:
Don Juan de Marana:If her face matches her feet-God help us both!See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

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5 out of 5 people found the following review useful.
The Great Profile As The Great Seducer, 30 March 2009
Author: bkoganbing from Buffalo, New York

Although John Barrymore was 44 when he played the role of Tirso DeMolina's famous libertine, the soft focus photography enabled to look years younger and really do a convincing job as the most famous seducer in fiction. In fact Barrymore plays two roles, the dashing cavalier Don Juan and his stern father who was cuckolded by his wife and imparted some cynical views on women to his young son in a prologue.

When the main action of the film gets going it takes place in Rome when the Borgias were running things. Cesare Borgia played by Warner Oland and his evil sister Lucretia who has Estelle Taylor, then Mrs. Jack Dempsey playing her part. They're quite a pair, cruel and sadistic, and they've got a cousin played by Montagu Love who rivals Don Juan in the seducing department.

Barrymore is ostensibly in Rome as a student, but he's way too busy with his female conquests for any academics. He and Love have their eyes on the same woman, Mary Astor, who is royalty herself, related to the Orsinis who the Borgias have kicked out of power. That rivalry is what fuels the plot of this film.

Director Alan Crosland was obviously influenced by Cecil B. DeMille in directing this film. The sumptuous sets and even more the scenes of debauchery could be found in many a DeMille spectacle. And we don't get DeMille's moralizing with the film either.

As for Barrymore he plays the part with the dash and verve of Douglas Fairbanks who later got to play Don Juan, but as a much older man in Faribanks's final film during the sound era. Note the dueling sequence with Love. Warner Brothers for whom this film was produced used some of the same bits in their sound version of The Adventures Of Don Juan with Errol Flynn.

There is also a nice bit by Willard Louis as Barrymore's lackey, Pedrillo. Sad that he would die the same year as this film came out. He was quite amusing in the role.

Still it's Barrymore's show and quite a show it is. Don Juan is a good chance to see a young John Barrymore at the zenith of his acting talent.

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