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The Unholy Three (1925)

Passed  -  Crime | Drama | Romance  -  16 August 1925 (USA)
7.3
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Ratings: 7.3/10 from 995 users  
Reviews: 23 user | 17 critic

A sideshow ventriloquist, midget, and strongman form a conspiracy known as "The Unholy Three" and commit a series of robberies.

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Matt Moore ...
...
Harry Earles ...
Matthew Betz ...
Edward Connelly ...
Judge
William Humphrey ...
Attorney for Defense (as William Humphreys)
E. Alyn Warren ...
Prosecuting Attorney (as A.E. Warren)
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Storyline

Three sideshow performers leave their lives of captivity and become "The Unholy Three." Echo the ventriloquist assumes the role of a kindly old grandmother who runs a bird shop. Tweedledee, the "twenty inch man," becomes her grandbaby, and Hercules is their assistant. Soon an incredible crime wave is launched from their little store. Written by David Ezell <dezell@cody.gac.peachnet.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

16 August 1925 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Trindade Maldita  »

Box Office

Budget:

$103,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$704,000 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(alternate)

Sound Mix:

Color:

| (tinted)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During the scene where Echo and company are fleeing the pet store, Echo decides to take his pet ape with them. The "Ape" was actually a three-foot-tall chimp who was made to appear gigantic with camera trickery, an especially built smaller scale set to make it look bigger, and perspective shots. When Echo removes the ape from his cage, the shot shows Echo (with his back turned to the camera) unlocking the cage and walking the ape to the truck. The ape appears to be roughly the same size as Echo. This effect was achieved by having dwarf actor Harry Earles (who played "Tweedledee" in the film) play Echo for these brief shots, and then cutting to the normal sized Lon Chaney, making it seems as though the Ape is gigantic. See more »

Goofs

For a couple of shots when Echo & The Kid are at Mr. Arlington's house, Harry Earles (the actor playing The Kid) accidentally left his wedding ring on his finger. See more »

Quotes

Professor Echo, the ventriloquist, aka Mrs. 'Granny' O'Grady: You're makin' a play for that guy!
Rosie O'Grady: Since when do you own me?
Tweedledee, the dwarf, aka Little Willie: If you tip that boob off to who we are, I'll lay some lilies under your chin!
Rosie O'Grady: Da-da! Da-da!
See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Opera Ghost: A Phantom Unmasked (2000) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Lon Chaney gives a memorable performance in a most unusual role
16 July 2005 | by (Westchester County, NY) – See all my reviews

When I was a kid in the '60s I was an avid reader of Forrest J. Ackerman's Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine, and it was there I first heard about the director Tod Browning. He and his work were prominently featured in the pages of FM, where the (still missing) London After Midnight was often lamented as the Holy Grail of lost films. There were also frequent references to The Unholy Three in both its silent and talkie incarnations. It took me decades to finally catch up with the silent version, and my response is kind of schizo; objectively, I'm aware that in a number of ways it's a ridiculous movie, and yet it's great fun, and highly entertaining. It's a guilty pleasure, like Bar-B-Q flavored potato chips: something you know you shouldn't indulge in, but you do anyway. And I believe the main reason the movie works so well is the sheer star power of Lon Chaney.

Chaney and Browning worked together many times, but this was their biggest box office success. Despite the general impression to the contrary their collaborations were not horror films. In fact, as far as I can determine not one of their movies featured any supernatural elements; even the vampire of London After Midnight turns out to be a police inspector in disguise. Most of the Browning/Chaney films are crime melodramas with bizarre details stirred into the mix, often involving people from the lowest rungs of show business, such as circuses and carnivals. Chaney's characters in these stories are often afflicted with an intense, unrequited passion for a young woman (most memorably and disturbingly in The Unknown), and his behavior and actions are affected by this obsession, usually to his disadvantage, sometimes fatally so.

By the time The Unholy Three was produced Browning had developed his recurring themes and motifs into a highly effective, time-tested formula. His directorial technique is stylish in an unobtrusive way: he'll use a device such as shadows thrown on a wall forming a silhouette of the three title characters, but he generally avoids flamboyant touches. With a story like this, he doesn't need them. The synopsis has been outlined elsewhere, but briefly it involves a trio of crooks from the sideshow world: Professor Echo the ventriloquist (Chaney) who disguises himself as an old lady, a strong man (Victor MacLaglen), and a midget (Harry Earles) who masquerades as a baby. A pet store serves as a front for their activities. The trio is actually is quintet, as they are accompanied by a thief named Rosie (Mae Busch) and a bespectacled patsy named Hector (Matt Moore) who is somehow oblivious that his employers are, well, not what they seem. Hector takes everything in stride. It's perfectly normal to him that the pet shop where he works offers not only birds and rabbits but also a dangerous gorilla in a big cage, so if Hector takes it for granted, hey, why shouldn't we? The plot turns on a jewel heist gone wrong, in part because of Prof. Echo's jealousy over Rosie. However, in this film the story is secondary to the sinister atmospherics.

While it's Chaney's performance that drives the film the other actors are perfectly cast-- more so than in the talkie remake --and the characters' interactions have a "rightness" that persuades us to overlook numerous credibility issues. As in the best Hitchcock films, we're willing to ignore gaping plot holes in order to savor the highlights. One of the most effective sequences features a police inspector who interrogates the trio in the wake of the jewel heist. He's unaware that the jewels he seeks are inside a toy elephant at his feet, a toy that supposedly belongs to the "baby." The scene is suspenseful and funny, and, for me, the sight of Harry Earles disguised as a baby is almost as creepy as anything in an out-and-out horror film.

The unlikely twists increase to the point of absurdity in the final scenes, yet the story follows the consistent internal logic of a deeply weird dream. It's no surprise this was such a big hit in its day. I was fortunate enough to see a recently restored print of this film at the Museum of Modern Art this summer, back-to-back with the talkie remake. The silent version in particular went over quite well, though admittedly there were chuckles when a title card glibly announces the outcome of Prof. Echo's trial. Afterward in the lobby viewers were enthusiastic about the film, and about Lon Chaney. Seventy-five years after his death audiences are still impressed with his charismatic presence. So here's a tip of the hat to Forry Ackerman, who saw the Browning/Chaney films when they were new and was right about this one all along!


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