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The Phantom of the Opera (1925) Poster

Trivia

For the 1929 sound version, Universal purchased a pipe organ from the Robert Morton Organ Company in Van Nuys, CA. It was installed on Stage 10, which was first used for filming and quickly converted for scoring music as well as doing Foley sound effects work. The organ was used for scenes where Erik plays the organ in his basement lair. It was used in several Universal feature film scores including The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) and Ghost Story (1981), as well as episodes of various TV series produced by the studio. It was sold sometime in the late 1990s.
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According to Charles Van Enger, Chief Cinematographer of the film (and one of Lon Chaney's most trusted associates), Mary Philbin's reaction to the unmasked Phantom was real - that she had no idea what he would look like until that exact moment.
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Also according to Van Enger, he himself had a very strong reaction as Chaney's unsuspecting "guinea pig". Chaney had summoned Van Enger to his dressing room, but without telling him why. When he got there and was standing about 1 foot behind the actor, Lon suddenly spun around in full Phantom makeup! "I almost wet my pants. I fell back over a stool and landed flat on my back!" Chaney laughed so hard and Van Enger, who by then was "mad as hell" yelled, "Are you NUTS?" Unable to clearly talk with his fake teeth in, he spit them out: "Never mind Charlie, you already told me what I wanted to know."
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Inside sound stage 28, part of the opera house set continues to stand to the side where it was filmed some eight decades ago making it the oldest standing interior film set in the world. Though it remains impressive, time has taken its toll and it is very rarely used. Urban legends claim the set remains because when workers have attempted to take it down in the past there have been fatal accidents, said to be caused by the ghost of Lon Chaney Sr.
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The Phantom's distinctive bed was re-used as Gloria Swanson's in Sunset Blvd. (1950).
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Edward Sedgwick directed a few scenes after director Rupert Julian walked off the set after heated arguments with cast and crew.
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Lon Chaney devised his own make-up.
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Several sequences were shot in various color processes for the top general release prints. Technicolor was used for scenes from FAUST and the Bal Masque scene, Prizmacolor sequences were shot for the "Soldier's Night" introduction, and Handschiegel (a process that uses stamps to hand-color prints) for the Phantom's notes and red cape on the rooftop. Only the Technicolor Bal Masque sequence is known to survive (an IB print from the 1929 re-release).
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Gregory Peck's earliest movie memory is of being so scared by The Phantom of the Opera (1925) at age 9 that his grandmother allowed him to sleep in the bed with her that night.
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A full working organ was installed at the Astor in New York City for the film's premiere.
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Lon Chaney did a lot of work with his performance through his hands. The son of two deaf mutes, he learned to be very expressive with them, and as this is a silent performance, the hands are required to convey quite a lot.
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Lon Chaney put egg membrane on his eyeballs to give them a cloudy look.
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A Jewel Production. Unlike most of its peers, Universal never owned a theater chain (ultimately, a wise decision given the 1949 Supreme Court anti-trust decision that would threaten the livelihood of many of its competitors). As a result, in 1916, Carl Laemmle devised a 3-tiered branding system to market its features to independent theater owners: Red Feather (low-budget programmers), Bluebird (mainstream releases) and Jewel (costly prestige productions). The studio would abandon branding altogether by the end of 1929.
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On October 31, 2008, this film was screened at the Walt Disney Concert Hall with live musical accompaniment by the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. Ads contained a tag line that was a clever twist on that for Alien (1979): "In silent films, no one can hear you scream".
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The only stage in the history of Hollywood where a turntable was built specifically for the 1925 "Phantom of the Opera" feature film, and has remained intact for ninety years. Stage theatrics use of a turntable in set design was primarily a European novelty incorporated into elaborate opera productions in England, Italy and Germany. A turntable built into the set design was first introduced on Broadway in 1941, for the Kurt Weill musical "Lady In The Dark" designed by stage designer Harry Horner. The novelty of this motorized turntable was unique, a center donut ring, with an outer six foot ring. The entire "donut turntable" could move in either direction, or the center turntable could move independent of the stationary outer ring, and the outer ring could move in the opposite direction of the center ring. The same turntable concept was copied in the set design for the 1969 Broadway musical "CoCo" designed by Cecil Beaton. The Oliver Smith set design for the 1956-1962 Broadway musical "My Fair Lady" utilized two turntables, aligned on center stage, rotating in opposite direction of each other, to transform the scenic set elements. During the 50s, 60s and 70s, NBC Burbank's stock scenery division built a motorized turntable which expanded from a ten foot diameter, to a thirty foot diameter turntable. This scenic element was used on several NBC color television variety series, as "The Dinah Shore Show," "The Bob Hope Show," "The Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis Show," etc.. "The stage 28 Phantom of the Opera turntable" is unique in the history of both Hollywood films, live color television series/specials and Broadway stage productions.
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Ben Carré was called in to design the sets, and although he had worked at the Paris Opera House, he had already been living in California for some time doing sets.
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The only part of the set sill standing is the Opera House, though the only parts left completely untouched are the boxes and stage sides.
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Filmed in Stage 28 at Universal Studios, Hollywood.
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The Phantom's makeup was designed to resemble a skull. Lon Chaney attached a strip of fish skin (a thin, translucent material) to his nostrils with spirit gum, pulled it back until he got the tilt he wanted, then attached the other end of the fish skin under his bald cap. For some shots, a wire-and-rubber device was used, and according to cameraman Charles Van Enger it cut into Chaney's nose and caused a good deal of bleeding. Cheeks were built up using a combination of cotton and collodion. Ears were glued back and the rest was greasepaint shaded in the proper areas of the face. The sight was said to have caused some patrons at the premiere to faint.
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The print restored by Kino is a 1929 re-release version that was re-edited, eliminating some scenes and inserting new material shot after the 1925 version was finished. These included a sound sequence with opera star Mary Fabian singing in the role of Carlotta. In the re-edited version, Virginia Pearson, who played Carlotta in the silent 1925 version, is credited and referred to as "Carlotta's Mother" instead.
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The film was re-released in sound in 1929 using Vitaphone/Western Electric sound disks. Approximately 40% of the film was re-shot in synchronous sound and the rest had a music/soundtrack added or was dubbed over. The Kino edition is a silent version of the 1929 cut (as are, with few exceptions, most others), which was a common practice at the time for theaters that did not have sound systems installed. For the sound edition Lon Chaney was not available, and contractually Universal was not allowed to have vocal synchronization of the Phantom. However, the studio had third-person lines written and dubbed over shots of the Phantom's shadow. The actor who spoke these lines is uncredited, but it is probably Universal regular Phillips Smalley.
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Rupert Julian fought constantly with the cast and crew. Julian and Lon Chaney were not on speaking terms for most of the production, and had to communicate through intermediaries. Norman Kerry actually charged at Julian while riding a horse, knocking Julian to the ground in front of a group of onlookers.
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During the climactic chase through the streets of Paris, the Cathedral from _The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923/I)_ (q.v.) can be clearly seen.
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Lon Chaney was claimed, by a few sources, to have taken over direction of several of the scenes he was in, allegedly including the famous unmasking scene.
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Included among the '1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die', edited by Steven Jay Schneider.
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Selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry in 1998 as being "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant."
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The failure of the original copyright holder to renew the film's copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second- or third-generation (or more) copies of the film.
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Sound stage 28 (the Phantom Stage) has been used in countless other films and television series including Phantom of the Opera (1943), Dracula (1931), The Raven (1935), The Sixth Sense (1972) and Torn Curtain (1966).
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Lon Chaney's horrific, self-applied make-up was kept secret right up until the film's premiere.
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A sound version of the film arrived in February 1930, grossing another million dollars. It has since vanished and is considered lost.
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A new transfer of the film was struck in the 1950s. Even at this stage, the original nitrate stock was starting to disintegrate. Most of the current prints seen today are based on that 1950s transfer.
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Despite its teething production troubles and reshoots, the film was a great box office success, pulling in over $2 million.
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When Rupert Julian was first presented with the script, he simply said "Lon Chaney, or it can't be done!"
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Universal Studios' Stage 28, the Lon Chaney 1925 B&W feature film "Phantom of the Opera" interior European three tiered box seat horseshoe theatre and stage proscenium existed as a permanent studio stage standing set. The Universal Studios' stage 28 "Phantom of the Opera" theatre interior set was also used in Alfred Hitchcock's 1966 feature film "The Torn Curtain." In 1965, the Paris Opera theatre interior set had fallen into disrepair, but Universal gave permission for Hitch to use it in the climax of his film. Hitch had his crew (including Joe Musso, a young budding illustrator) restore the theatre set back to the way the stage set was originally built for the 1925 Lon Chaney film. The original blueprints for the 1925 Chaney film no longer existed in 1964, but Joe Musso had a great 8"x10" photo collection from the Chaney film that showed the Paris Opera theater interior in great detail. Based on these archived B&W photos, the production designer, Hein Heckroth, art director, Frank Arrigo, and assistant art director, Joe Alves, had the set designers recreate new blueprints for the construction crew to restore the stage theatre set properly. Hitchcock had the original seats reupholstered and put back into the audience floor space, filling the theater floor and the European style horseshoe three tiered box gallery with 500 extras, along with Paul Newman and Julie Andrews. The set designers who worked on the film included John Corso, Burwell Hamrick, William "Bill" O'Brien. Mort Rabinowitz also worked on the film as an illustrator. Mort Rabinowitz became a production designer shortly after working on the Hitchcock feature film. Joe Musso did the set illustrations on the opera house in color and painted Hitchcock's film crew in the audience besides Newman, Julie and Hitch. Hitchcock kept Joe Musso's illustration as his private and personal souvenir.
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The Universal Studios' stage 28 floor-foot print, built for the 1925 B&W Lon Chaney "Phantom of the Opera" feature film, is enormous. The European horseshoe Paris Opera Theatre's three tiered box audience seating area surrounds the floor audience ramped area. The master wide-shot from the top rear box seat area encompasses the stage proscenium, orchestra pit, and the chandelier. The top of the interior theatre ceiling master shot is completed with a matte painting. The audience area is one third of the stage's foot print. The North end of stage 28 encompasses the raised stage area. What really makes this stage unique is that in 1925, an elaborate 30'-0" diameter mechanical turntable sits in the center of the front stage area, allowing forty (40) feet from the back edge of the turntable to the rear stage back-wall. The basement of stage 28 houses the original turntable mechanical mechanism to turn the 30' diameter turntable. All of the mechanics for the turntable have remained intact, sitting in their original structural position. The turntable centers on a center cylindrical shaft, with triangular inverted bracing branches, welded to the center shaft, similar to an inverted umbrella brace. The entire weight of the turntable is thrust upon this center turning spindle. After the original film was completed, the turntable area of the stage floor was covered with three layers of 3/4" thick plywood 4'-0" x 10'-0" sheets, which allowed future film sets to be built upon the turntable stage area for feature filming. When a camera crane is used on the stage, allowances have to be considered with the turntable's floor position, related to the film set requirements. The original stage had a theatre pin rail system with hanging pipe arbors for electrical lights, existing on the stage right area. The raised stage area was utilized for feature film "process photography" because of the depth required for a film projector onto a rear screen, enough room for a camera and crew, with an acting/performance area in front of the screen. The projector camera has to be in direct center of the filming camera's lens point of view position, with a depth of field allowance. The 1943 Universal Studios Technicolor remake of "Phantom of the Opera" starring Nelson Eddy, Susanna Foster and Claude Rains stripped the plywood floor covering in order to utilize the turntable for the film's stage production numbers. The turntable mechanism was tuned up and used in the film. After the 1943 Technicolor film was completed, the stage flooring was installed, re-covering the turntable. The turntable has never been used since the 1943 feature film. The interior Opera House theatre has been filmed, and the production stage area of stage 28 has been host to many feature and television films.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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