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The Phantom of the Opera
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The Phantom of the Opera (1925) More at IMDbPro »

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The Phantom of the Opera -- A mad, disfigured composer seeks love with a lovely young opera singer.

Overview

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Director:
Writer:
Gaston Leroux (from the celebrated novel by)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Phantom of the Opera on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
15 November 1925 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The greatest horror film of modern cinema! See more »
Plot:
A mad, disfigured composer seeks love with a lovely young opera singer. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
2 wins See more »
User Reviews:
The first remains the best See more (115 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Lon Chaney ... The Phantom

Mary Philbin ... Christine Daae
Norman Kerry ... Vicomte Raoul de Chagny
Arthur Edmund Carewe ... Ledoux

Gibson Gowland ... Simon Buquet
John St. Polis ... Comte Philip de Chagny (as John Sainpolis)
Snitz Edwards ... Florine Papillon
Mary Fabian ... Carlotta (1929 re-edited version only)
Virginia Pearson ... Carlotta / Carlotta's Mother (1929 re-edited version)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Olive Ann Alcorn ... La Sorelli (uncredited)
Joseph Belmont ... Stage Manager (uncredited)
Alexander Bevani ... Mephistopheles (uncredited)
Earl Gordon Bostwick ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Edward Cecil ... Faust (uncredited)

Ruth Clifford ... Ballerina (uncredited)
Chester Conklin ... Orderly (uncredited)
Roy Coulson ... The Jester (uncredited)
Bruce Covington ... M. Moncharmin (uncredited)
Ward Crane ... Count Ruboff (uncredited)
George Davis ... Guard at Christine's Door (uncredited)
Madame Fiorenza ... Mme. Giry - Keeper of the Box (uncredited)
Cesare Gravina ... Manager (uncredited)
William Humphrey ... M. Debienne (uncredited)
Carla Laemmle ... Prima Ballerina (uncredited)
Edward Martindel ... Comte Philip de Chagny (1929 re-edited version) (uncredited)
Grace Marvin ... Martha (uncredited)
John Miljan ... Valentin (uncredited)
Rolfe Sedan ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Bernard Siegel ... Joseph Buquet (uncredited)
William Tracy ... Ratcatcher - Messenger from the Shadows (uncredited)
William Tyroler ... Director of Opera Orchestra (uncredited)
Vola Vale ... Ballerina (uncredited)
Anton Vaverka ... Prompter (uncredited)
George B. Williams ... M. Ricard (uncredited)
Ed Wolff ... Mob Leader at Finale (uncredited)
Edith Yorke ... Mama Valerius (uncredited)
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Directed by
Rupert Julian 
Lon Chaney (uncredited)
Ernst Laemmle (uncredited)
Edward Sedgwick (uncredited)
 
Writing credits
Gaston Leroux (from the celebrated novel by)

Walter Anthony  titles (uncredited)
Elliott J. Clawson  adaptation (uncredited)
Bernard McConville  treatment (uncredited)
Frank M. McCormack  uncredited
Tom Reed  titles (uncredited)
Raymond L. Schrock  adaptation (uncredited)
Jasper Spearing  treatment (uncredited)
Richard Wallace  additional comedy material (uncredited)

Produced by
Carl Laemmle .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Joseph Carl Breil (San Francisco world premiere)
Roy Budd (1993)
Carl Davis (1996)
Gustav Hinrichs (New York premiere)
Gabriel Thibaudeau (1990)
Rick Wakeman (1990)
Sam Perry (1929 sound re-release) (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Milton Bridenbecker (uncredited)
Virgil Miller (uncredited)
Charles Van Enger (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Edward Curtiss (uncredited)
Maurice Pivar (uncredited)
Gilmore Walker (uncredited)
 
Production Design by
Ben Carré (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Charles D. Hall (uncredited)
Elmer Sheeley (uncredited)
 
Set Decoration by
Russell A. Gausman (uncredited)
 
Makeup Department
Lon Chaney .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Raymond L. Schrock .... executive production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Joe Pasternak .... assistant director (uncredtied)
 
Art Department
Ben Carré .... consulting artist (uncredited)
Charles Gemora .... opera house set design (uncredited)
Charles A. Logue .... scenic artist (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Jack Foley .... foley artist: re-issue (uncredited)
C. Roy Hunter .... recording supervisor: re-issue (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Trey Freeman .... digital artist: digital restoration and color correction (restored version)
Jerome Ash .... visual effects supervisor (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Edward T. Estabrook .... supervisor: color photography (uncredited)
Roman Freulich .... still photographer (uncredited)
Cliff Shirpser .... assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Joseph Cherniavsky .... synchronization (1929 re-release) (uncredited)
 
Music Department
James Fitzpatrick .... music contractor (1996)
David Broekman .... composer: stock music (1929 re-release) (uncredited)
Arthur Jentsch .... composer: stock music (1929 reissue) (uncredited)
Hugo Riesenfeld .... composer: stock music (1929 reissue) (uncredited)
William Schiller .... composer: additional music (1929 re-release) (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Carl Laemmle .... presenter
Carl Laemmle .... president: Universal Pictures Corp.
Ernest Belcher .... ballet master (uncredited)
Lon Chaney .... mask maker: his own mask (uncredited)
Edwards Davis .... adr voice (uncredited)
Archie Hall .... technical director (uncredited)
Fay Holderness .... adr voice (uncredited)
Ernst Laemmle .... director: sound sequences (uncredited)
Jack Lawton .... title designer: notes (uncredited)
Robert Ross .... assistant: Mr. Julian (uncredited)
Edward Sedgwick .... supplementary director (uncredited)
Ralph Slosser .... set production assistant (uncredited)
Phillips Smalley .... adr voice (uncredited)
Miss Starkey .... secretary (uncredited)
Meta Stern .... researcher (uncredited)
William von Wymetal .... choreographer (uncredited)
Aileen Webster .... script supervisor (uncredited)
Max Winkler .... cue sheet compiler (uncredited)
 
Thanks
Kevin Phelan .... special thanks: FilmTel supervisor (1999 restoration)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
93 min | UK:101 min (original release) | USA:92 min (1995 version) | USA:107 min (DVD version) | Canada:106 min (Ontario) | 95 min (1929 re-release)
Country:
Color:
Black and White | Color (2-strip Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (talking sequences, musical score and sound effects) (1929 re-release) | Silent
Certification:
Argentina:Atp | Australia:PG | Netherlands:14 (original rating) (1928) | UK:PG | USA:Unrated | USA:TV-G (TV rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Inside sound stage 28, part of the opera house set continues to stand to the side where it was filmed some eight decades ago making it the oldest standing interior film set in the world. Though it remains impressive, time has taken its toll and it is very rarely used. Urban legends claim the set remains because when workers have attempted to take it down in the past there have been fatal accidents, said to be caused by the ghost of Lon Chaney Sr.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Raoul and Ledoux are approaching the Phantom's lair. Ledoux makes a drop through a trapdoor about 10 or 12 feet down, clearly out of arms length to the opening above. However, Raoul in the next shot above merely hands down his lantern as if Ledoux is merely a couple of feet away.See more »
Quotes:
Erik:[title card] She has betrayed me!See more »
Movie Connections:
Version of Opera (1987)See more »

FAQ

How were some of the make-up effects done?
How did Lon Chaney create such a startling make-up effect?
How much of the film was presented in color?
See more »
37 out of 46 people found the following review useful.
The first remains the best, 20 December 2004
Author: divaclv

"The Phantom of the Opera" is a tale that's been oft told, but all too often it's told poorly. The story--a grand melodrama, like much of opera itself--requires a fine balance of terror and tragedy, with perhaps a bit of camp humor to lighten the proceedings, and finding the right tone is a task which has defeated many a director and actor. But it can be done, as this first of the many film incarnations proves.

For anyone needing an overview of Gaston Leroux's tale, the premise is briefly thus: during the latter decades of the Victorian Era, the great Paris Opera is troubled with whispers of a ghost--a frightening specter which visits misfortune on the company should they fail to please him. Up-and-coming singer Christine Daae (Mary Philbin), meanwhile, is more preoccupied with her singing tutor--a disembodied voice she believes to be an emissary from her dead father, who guides her to new heights but demands she put her music above all else, including and especially her handsome childhood sweetheart Raoul (Norman Kerry). Neither Phantom nor tutor is a spirit in truth, but are two different sides of the same man--a horribly disfigured, unnaturally gifted, and frighteningly passionate man, but a man nonetheless.

Despite dated acting techniques and some extremely overwrought title cards ("You must save me, Raoul--oh, save me!" Christine pleads at one point), the silent film version of "Phantom" has held up remarkably well, thanks to some evocative scenes and an unforgettable turn by Lon Chaney in the title role. The moment when the Phantom, driven by his all-consuming desire for Christine, lures the girl into his home beneath the Opera is every bit as eerie and compelling as it should be. An Escher-like series of ramps descends into the earth, leading to the sort of black subterranean lake Charon would feel at home on, and an underground apartment that seems fairly normal, until you see the coffin in the master bedroom and the mirrored torture chamber adjoining.

Any version of "Phantom," though, lives or dies by its title character, and Chaney does not disappoint. Even in his early scenes, where he appears almost solely as a shadow on the wall, he has a remarkable presence, his gestures expressive and elegant in silhouette. The audience first sees him in physical form as Christine first sees him--a masked and cloaked figure, disturbing yet with an aura of weary sadness about him. When that mask finally comes off in the film's landmark scene, Chaney's makeup genius is instantly in evidence. The wild-eyed, cadaverous skull remains the most frightening interpretations of the Phantom's disfigurement, and also the one which hews closest to Leroux's description. (To be fair, it's doubtful Chaney's makeup would have been practical in a sound film; the distortions of his nose and mouth would have made speaking--and singing--very difficult indeed.) The movie's greatest weakness is its ending, a chase scene (complete with the standard Angry Torch-Bearing Mob) that feels wedged in, probably because that's precisely what it is. The original ending stuck with Leroux's novel, where the Phantom, moved by Christine's compassion, releases her to marry her young suitor--but the first audiences, apparently not as empathetic for the character as his creator was, found this ending an unsatisfying one. Unfortunately, the current resolution denies the Phantom the redemption which has been a major part of his appeal to modern audiences, and one wishes that we had an opportunity to see Chaney portray it. But on the whole, this is a "Phantom" that remains head and shoulders above its many film successors.

Was the above review useful to you?
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The Phantom of the Opera Animated film based on Gaston Leroux's novel info-955-273206
is this film public domain? mhworm243
If I were Christine in this version.... scarlaohorror
The original ending...screenshots? writergurlkristin-1
BFI Blu-ray pitsburghfuzz
The original 1925 film lizzy-snowe
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