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The Lost World (1925) Poster

Trivia

Arthur Conan Doyle attended the movie with his family. He liked it.
The Brontosaurus head was operated by three men.
Was the first in-flight movie, having been shown on an Imperial Airways flight in a converted Handley-Page bomber from London, UK, to Paris, France, in April 1925.
In July 1929, the Kodascope Libraries acquired the 16mm rights to this film. The original lavender protection positive itself was edited down to five reels to create the abridged 16mm Kodascope version. This abridged Kodascope version was the only one widely known to survive in the U.S. until a more extensive (but still incomplete) original tinted, toned and hand-colored 35mm print was found in 2003 in the hands of a private collector and purchased by Film Preservation Associates.
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While filming one of the stop-motion scenes, the cameraman spotted a pair of pliers in the picture. So as not to draw attention to them by having them suddenly disappear, he moved them a little at a time until they were out of the shot.
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When the explorers return to London, there is a shot of the London Pavilion with a flashing sign advertising a showing of The Sea Hawk (1924), a movie in which two of the film's stars, Wallace Beery and Lloyd Hughes, had also appeared.
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This film was such a success that there were plans to do a sound remake. In possible preparation for this, Aileen Rothacker reached an agreement with First National to withdraw the film from distribution. First National was to destroy all release prints and the foreign negative but the domestic negative was to be retained. It is not known if the original negatives decomposed or if they were mistakenly disposed of.
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This was the first full-length feature film to utilize stop-motion animation in the creation of its creatures.
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The scene where the dinosaurs flee the volcano was created on a tabletop that was 75 feet wide and 150 feet long.
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The original 35mm ten-reel print was destroyed in a fire at Universal Studios.
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The dinosaurs' appearances were modeled after the illustrations by artist Charles R. Knight.
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The strange, spiky Triceratops-like dinosaur was based on Charles R. Knight's famous painting of Agathaumas. Nowadays, scientists argue that such a dinosaur even existed. The painting itself was based on very fragmentary fossil remains, thus many features of the animal were purely speculative guesses.
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The failure of the original copyright holder to renew the film's copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second- or third-generation (or more) copies of the film.
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Macel Delgado based his models on Charles Knight's iconic dinosaur paintings for the Museum of Natural History.
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Delgado used a football bladder to help simulate the dinosaur's breathing,
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On Feb 4, 1926, "The Lost World" was chosen by the German Air Service to be the country's first in-flight movie ever.
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The dinosaur miniatures were donated to the Museum of Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles. After many years the rubber models began to sulphurize and disintegrate. They were stored away and inadvertently sealed between the walls of the facility when a new wing was added.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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