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The Lost World
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The Lost World (1925) More at IMDbPro »

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The Lost World -- The first film adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's classic novel about a land where prehistoric creatures still roam.
The Lost World -- The first film adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's classic novel about a land where prehistoric creatures still roam.

Overview

User Rating:
7.1/10   2,954 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Arthur Conan Doyle (based upon the novel by)
Marion Fairfax (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Lost World on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
22 June 1925 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
See the mighty prehistoric monsters clash with modern lovers in a most remarkable story of love, romance and amazing adventure. See more »
Plot:
The first film adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's classic novel about a land where prehistoric creatures still roam. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 win & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
The Lost Film See more (72 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Bessie Love ... Paula White (as Miss Bessie Love)
Lewis Stone ... Sir John Roxton (as Mr. Lewis Stone)

Wallace Beery ... Professor Challenger (as Mr. Wallace Beery)
Lloyd Hughes ... Ed Malone (as Mr. Lloyd Hughes)
Alma Bennett ... Gladys Hungerford (as Miss Alma Bennett)
Arthur Hoyt ... Professor Summerlee (as Mr. Arthur Hoyt)
Margaret McWade ... Mrs. Challenger (as Miss Margaret McWade)
Bull Montana ... Ape-man (as Mr. Bull Montana)
Frank Finch Smiles ... Austin (as Mr. Finch Smiles)
Jules Cowles ... Zambo (as Mr. Jules Cowles)
George Bunny ... Colin McArdle (as Mr. George Bunny)
Charles Wellesley ... Major Hibbard (as Mr. Charles Wellsley)
Jocko the Monkey ... Himself (as Jocko)

Arthur Conan Doyle ... Himself
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Mary the Chimpanzee ... Herself (uncredited)
Virginia Brown Faire ... Marquette - Half-caste Girl (uncredited)
Holmes Herbert ... Angry Man at Meeting (uncredited)
Nelson McDowell ... Lawyer Advising the Editor (uncredited)

Gilbert Roland ... Extra (uncredited)
Leo White ... Percy Potts (uncredited)

Directed by
Harry O. Hoyt (dramatic direction)
 
Writing credits
Arthur Conan Doyle (based upon the novel by)

Marion Fairfax (screenplay)

Produced by
Scott MacQueen .... producer (1991 alternate version)
David Shepard .... producer (2000 alternate version) (as David H. Shepard)
Earl Hudson .... producer (uncredited)
Jamie White .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Robert Israel (2000)
R.J. Miller (1991)
Cecil Copping (New York premiere) (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Arthur Edeson (photography)
 
Film Editing by
George McGuire 
 
Set Decoration by
Milton Menasco (sets by)
 
Makeup Department
Cecil Holland .... makeup artist: ape-man (uncredited)
Perc Westmore .... makeup supervisor (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
William G. Crosby .... assistant director (uncredited)
Milton Menasco .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Milton Menasco .... architecture
 
Special Effects by
Marcel Delgado .... model construction (uncredited)
Willis H. O'Brien .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
Marcel Delgado .... associate technical director
Ralph Hammeras .... associate technical director
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Charles Gemora .... ape-man suit creator (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Robert Israel .... music compiler and director: 2000 alternate version
Frank S. Truda .... musical director (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Marcel Delgado .... associate researcher
Marion Fairfax .... editorial direction
Ralph Hammeras .... associate researcher
Earl Hudson .... supervised by
Fred Jackman .... chief technician (as Fred W. Jackman)
Devereaux Jennings .... additional technical staffer (as J. Devereaux Jennings)
Hans F. Koenekamp .... additional technical staffer (as Hans Koenekamp)
Willis H. O'Brien .... researcher
Willis H. O'Brien .... technical director
Watterson Rothacker .... by arrangement with (as Watterson R. Rothacker)
Homer Scott .... additional technical staffer
Vernon L. Walker .... additional technical staffer
William Dowling .... additional director (uncredited)
Colby Harriman .... director of presentation (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
USA:64 min (1991 alternate version) | USA:93 min (2000 alternate version) | USA:64 min (Kodascope Version) | USA:106 min (original version) | 100 min (1998 George Eastman House Restoration)
Country:
Color:
Black and White | Color (hand-colored) | Color (tinted and toned)
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Spain:T | USA:Unrated | USA:TV-G (TV rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Delgado used a football bladder to help simulate the dinosaur's breathing,See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: At the beginning of their boat journey in the Amazon forest, a bird appears in the bushes at the right side of the screen. The bird is obviously thrown into the shot by someone.See more »
Quotes:
Prof. Challenger:[title card] And I'm not here tonight to defend my statements - - but to demand that a committee be formed to go back to the Lost World with me -...See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Dinosaur Movies (1993) (V)See more »
Soundtrack:
The Lost WorldSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
34 out of 35 people found the following review useful.
The Lost Film, 30 June 2005
Author: Lechuguilla from Dallas, Texas

In this 1925 silent era film, a Professor Challenger (Wallace Beery) leads a group of British explorers to South America, to prove to the civilized world that there exists a land of living prehistoric creatures. What the explorers find is exactly that ... a rugged Amazon plateau inhabited by all kinds of dinosaurs. It's a wonderful film concept befitting Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's adventure novel. The dinosaurs were brought to cinematic life via stop-motion animation, the first time that the then new technique had been applied, on such a grand cinematic scale. For its visuals alone, "The Lost World" is an important film.

The problem I have is not with the film, but with the way the film has been mishandled in the eighty years since it was released. Much of the original film was lost or cut out, a sad commentary on the way our culture has underestimated the value of silent films. Recently, the film has been at least partially restored. That, in turn, has led to confusion as to the extent to which the film being watched reflects the original.

My understanding is that there is or was: (1) an original full length version, no longer available; (2) a thirty-two minute version shown as a short film; (3) a sixty-three minute original DVD version; and (4) a ninety minute restored, extended DVD version complete with soundtrack and commentary. None of these versions are exactly alike, and there may be other versions as well.

The version I watched was on DVD, and was sixty-three minutes in length; there was no soundtrack, no commentary. Since this version is vastly different from the original, and different from other versions, a conventional critique would be unfair. All that I can do is to make a couple of general observations.

The special effects were impressive for their time. But what I most liked was the film's sense of three-dimensional scale, as shown in many scenes, the tree bridge to the plateau, for example, or the rope ladder hanging down the side of the cliff with a person climbing down. Such scenes convey a sense of distance and height, important to any physical adventure or risk. What I found disconcerting was the scenes of dinosaurs detached from the characters. Most of the time, but not always, these dinosaur scenes were shown from the POV that would be optimal for the cinematic viewer, rather than from the POV of the characters. In other words, the dinosaurs were usually shown out of context to the film's narrative.

"The Lost World" (1925) is an important contribution to early cinema. Although the film may be somewhat tedious to watch and technically crude by today's standards, depending on version, the film will most surely be appreciated by film historians and by technicians interested in the evolution of cinematic special effects.

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See more (72 total) »

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How's the book? Game_Bounty
So underrated Paranoid_Android_82
My review, as written on Flixter prestonm1993
New Remake! Hyperboievr
Proof that dinosaurs were a**holes kthejoker
Agathaumus StormSworder
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