The Gold Rush
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

6 items from 2016


‘Batman v Superman,’ and a Brief History of the Extended Cut (Photos)

1 July 2016 6:22 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

“Batman v Superman” got ravaged by critics when it was released in theaters, but Zach Snyder and Warner Bros. hope to win some people back with an R-Rated extended cut. TheWrap’s Phil Owen commended the cut for adding scenes that made the plot more coherent. It wouldn’t be the first time that an extended or alternate cut fixed a bad film’s problems or enhanced a masterpiece. Extended cuts first became popular as theatrical re-releases in the 1970s, but date all the way back to the 40s. In 1942, Charlie Chaplin re-released his seminal 1925 Tramp film, “The Gold Rush. »

- Jeremy Fuster

Permalink | Report a problem


On this day: Liz & Dick Divorced, Harry Potter Published

26 June 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

On this day in history as it relates to the movies...

 

1819 The bicycle is patented by W.K. Clarkson, Jr. which could be why June has lots of bicycle holidays like "bike to work week" and such. There's even a Bicycle Film Festival happening in NYC this very weekend.

1904 Peter Lorre is born

1922 Underappeciated film star Eleanor Parker is born. Her two best known classics are Caged (1950, her first nomination in one of the all time best Best Actress years) and The Sound of Music (1965, snubbed in supporting actress). Also born on this day is two-time Oscar recipient Dick Smith, an indisputable giant in movie makeup. Among his classics: The Godfather, The Exorcist, Amadeus, and Taxi Driver

1925 Charles Chaplin's The Gold Rush premieres in Hollywood 

1956 Chris Isaak, hot musician and David Lynch favorite, is born

1970 Paul Thomas Anderson is born. We thank him forever for Boogie Nights, Magnolia, and There Will Be Blood, »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


Andrzej Żuławski’s 10 Favorite Films

7 March 2016 12:01 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

For a man who created forward-thinking, boundary-pushing cinema embraced by small, devoted sects of cinephiles, Andrzej Żuławski‘s Sight & Sound list of favorite films is, in so many words, surprisingly traditional. Few would look upon it and say it contains a single bad film on it, but those who’ve experienced his work might expect something other than Amarcord; maybe, in its place, an underground Eastern European horror film that’s gained no real cachet since the Soviet Union’s collapse.

That isn’t to suggest something inexplicable, however. The Gold Rush‘s fall-down comedy could be detected in some of Possession‘s more emphatic moments of physical exhaustion, and, while we’re at it, visual connections between On the Silver Globe and 2001‘s horror-ish stretches aren’t so out-of-bounds. So while this selection may not open your eyes once more to cinema’s many reaches, one might use it »

- Nick Newman

Permalink | Report a problem


Top 10 Oscar Surprises

24 February 2016 11:21 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Here are 10 Oscar moments that left us gobsmacked. Which winners, speeches, performances, fashions, and gaffes surprised you the most? Let us know in the comments below. 10. Charlie Chaplin Receives 12-Minute Standing Ovation (1972) It may not be surprising, exactly — after all, he earned it with "The Gold Rush," "City Lights," "Modern Times," and "The Great Dictator," among others — but the sheer length of the ovation Chaplin upon receiving an honorary Oscar in 1972 left the filmmaker himself nearly speechless. (Though he'd received a special award for "The Circus" in 1929, his remarkable career had, to that point, netted but three competitive nominations — two for "The Great Dictator" and one for "Monsieur Verdoux" — and no wins.) As perhaps the greatest of the silent cinema's actors and directors understood, there are times when "words seem so futile, so feeble," and this was surely one. 9. Roberto »

- Matt Brennan

Permalink | Report a problem


Criterion Collection: The Kid | Blu-ray Review

16 February 2016 10:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Outfitted with a new score and title sequence, reedited sans several scenes involving the woman, and rereleased in 1972, Charlie Chaplin’s first feature length film The Kid has finally made its way to home video in HD thanks to the Cineteca di Bologna’s gloriously meticulous restoration and 4k digital transfer. Originally released back in 1921 after about a half decade of acting and eventually directing wildly popular shorts for Keystone Studios, the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company and finally the Mutual Film Corporation, the film endured a year long production amidst personal and professional crisis. It was thought that Chaplin’s signature brand of comedic slapstick, which typically ran just two reels of film, could not support the length of a six reel feature, but as is evidenced within, the film perfectly fuses Chaplin’s penchant for melodrama with his masterful vaudevillian humor to create an astonishingly emotional comedy that plumbs »

- Jordan M. Smith

Permalink | Report a problem


The WGA Names the 101 Funniest Screenplays of All Time

31 December 2015 5:13 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Let’s end the year with a celebration of the funniest comedy scripts ever written. The Writer’s Guild of America has chosen the 101 best laugh-getting screenplays. Keep in mind that this is all about the writing, not the cast or the director.

1.Annie Hall (1977)

2. Some Like it Hot (1959)

3. Groundhog Day (1993)

4. Airplane! (1980)

5. Tootsie (1982)

6. Young Frankenstein (1974)

7. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

8. Blazing Saddles (1974)

9. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)

10. National Lampoon’s Animal House (1978)

11. This is Spinal Tap (1984)

12. The Producers (1967)

13. The Big Lebowski (1998)

14. Ghostbusters (1984)

15. When Harry Met Sally (1989)

16. Bridesmaids (2011)

17. Duck Soup (1933)

18. There’s Something About Mary (1998)

19. The Jerk (1979)

20. A Fish Called Wanda (1988)

21. His Girl Friday (1940)

22. The Princess Bride (1987)

23. Raising Arizona (1987)

24. Bringing Up Baby (1938)

25. Caddyshack (1980)

26. Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979)

27. The Graduate (1967)

28. The Apartment (1960)

29. Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006)

30. The Hangover (2009)

31. The 40-Year-Old Virgin (2005)

32. The Lady Eve »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

6 items from 2016


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners