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The Gold Rush
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The Gold Rush (1925) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 19 | slideshow) Videos (see all 8)
The Gold Rush -- It's 1898 and Charlie Chaplin's Little Tramp is headed north to the Yukon in search of gold.
The Gold Rush -- Trailer for The Gold Rush
The Gold Rush -- It's 1898 and Charlie Chaplin's little tramp is headed north to the Yukon in search of gold.
The Gold Rush -- It's 1898 and Charlie Chaplin's little tramp is headed north to the Yukon in search of gold.
The Gold Rush -- It's 1898 and Charlie Chaplin's little tramp is headed north to the Yukon in search of gold.

Overview

User Rating:
8.3/10   50,940 votes »
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Director:
Writer:
Charles Chaplin (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Gold Rush on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
1925 (Germany) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
The Tramp goes to the Klondike in search of gold and finds it and more. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
Gold is the operative word here. See more (132 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Charles Chaplin ... The Lone Prospector
Mack Swain ... Big Jim McKay
Tom Murray ... Black Larsen
Henry Bergman ... Hank Curtis
Malcolm Waite ... Jack Cameron
Georgia Hale ... Georgia
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jack Adams ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Frank Aderias ... Eskimo Child (uncredited)
Leona Aderias ... Eskimo Child (uncredited)
Lillian Adrian ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Sam Allen ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Claude Anderson ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Harry Arras ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Albert Austin ... Prospector (uncredited)
Marta Belfort ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
William Bell ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Francis Bernhardt ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
F.J. Beuaregard ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
E. Blumenthal ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
William Bradford ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
George Brock ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Pete Brogan ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
William Butler ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Cecile Cameron ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
R. Campbell ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Leland Carr ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
H.C. Chisholm ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Harry Coleman ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Heinie Conklin ... Prospector (uncredited)
Rebecca Conroy ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Dorothy Crane ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
James Darby ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Kay De Lay ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Harry De Mors ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Kay Deslys ... Georgia's Friend (uncredited)
James Dime ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
W.S. Dobson ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
John Eagown ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Aaron Edward ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
E. Espinosa ... Eskimo (uncredited)
Leon Farey ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
M. Farrell ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Richard Foley ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Charles Force ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
J.C. Fowler ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Al Ernest Garcia ... Prospector (uncredited)
Inez Gomez ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Sid Grauman ... Extra in Chilkoot Pass Climb (uncredited)

Lita Grey ... Extra in Chilkoot Pass Climb (uncredited)
Ray Grey ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
William Hackett ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Mildred Hall ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
James Hammer ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Ben Hart ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Gypsy Hart ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
R. Hausner ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Tom Hawley ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Helen Hayward ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Jack Herrick ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Jack Hoefer ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)

George Holt ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Josie Howard ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Jean Huntley ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Tom Hutchinson ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Carl Jensen ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Gladys Johnston ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Harry Jones ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Fred Karno Jr. ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Helen Kassler ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Bob Kelly ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
John King ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Freddie Lansit ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Elias Lazaroff ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
George Lesley ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Geraldine Leslie ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Francis Lowell ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Joan Lowell ... Georgia's Friend / Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Chris-Pin Martin ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Margaret Martin ... Squaw (uncredited)
Clyde McAtee ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
John McGrath ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Lillian McMurray ... Extra in Chilkoot Pass Climb (uncredited)
Dolores Mendes ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
John Millerta ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Ruth Milo ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Ray Morris ... Eskimo (uncredited)
Betty Morrissey ... Georgia's Friend (uncredited)
Marie Muggley ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Steve Murphy ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Florence Murth ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Mr. Myers ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
P. Nagle ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Princess Neela ... Squaw (uncredited)
George Neely ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Nellie Noxon ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
A.J. O'Connor ... Officer (uncredited)
H.C. Oliver ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Donnabelle Ouster ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
William Parmalee ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Jack Phillips ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Barbara Pierce ... Manicurist (uncredited)
Betty Pierce ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Art Price ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
John Rand ... Prospector (uncredited)
Lillian Reschm ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Frank Rice ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
C.F. Roark ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
E.M. Robb ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Lillian Rosine ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Edna Rowe ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Tiny Sandford ... Barman (uncredited)
Jane Sherman ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
J.J. Smith ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Joe Smith ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
C.B. Steele ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Larry Steers ... Tacoma First Officer (uncredited)
Frank Stockdale ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Daddy Taylor ... Ancient Dancing Prospector (uncredited)
Nina Trask ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Armand Triller ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
John Tully ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Jack Vedders ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Bess Wade ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Art Walker ... Officer (uncredited)
John Wallace ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Sharkey Weimar ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
White Cloud ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Mary Williams ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Marie Willis ... Woman in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Ed Wilson ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
H. Wolfinger ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Tom Wood ... Prospector (uncredited)
Dave Wright ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Ah Yot ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
George Young ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)
Ed Zimmer ... Man in Dance Hall (uncredited)

Directed by
Charles Chaplin 
 
Writing credits
Charles Chaplin (written by)

Produced by
Charles Chaplin .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Charles Chaplin (1942)
William P. Perry (1970 version)
Carli Elinor (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Roland Totheroh 
 
Film Editing by
Charles Chaplin (uncredited)
 
Production Design by
Charles D. Hall (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Alfred Reeves .... production manager (1942 re-release)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Harry d'Abbadie d'Arrast .... assistant director (uncredited)
Charles Reisner .... assistant director (uncredited)
A. Edward Sutherland .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Peter Stitch .... stand-by painter (uncredited)
Mr. Wood .... painter (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Mac Dalgleish .... sound recordist: 1942 reissue (as W.M. Dalgleish)
Pete Decker .... sound recordist: 1942 reissue
Harold E. McGhan .... sound editor: 1942 re-release (as Harold McGhan)
James L. Fields .... sound director: 1942 re-release (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Mark Marlatt .... camera operator (uncredited)
Jack Wilson .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Edward Manson .... editorial supervisor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Gerard Carbonara .... composer: additional music (1942 version)
Max Terr .... composer: additional music (1942 version)
Max Terr .... musical director (1942 version)
 
Transportation Department
Toraichi Kono .... driver: Mr. Chaplin (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Harry Crocker .... unit publicist (uncredited)
Georges Glass .... publicity director (1942 re-release) (uncredited)
Charles D. Hall .... technical director (uncredited)
Mr. Niemeyer .... wrangler (uncredited)
Kathleen Pryor .... stenographer (1942 re-release) (uncredited)
Della Steele .... script supervisor (uncredited)
Sid Swaney .... stand-in: Mr. Swain (uncredited)
Jim Tully .... unit publicist (uncredited)
Bud White .... wrangler: bear (uncredited)
 
Thanks
Alexander Woollcott .... dedicatee (1942 re-release)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
95 min (24 fps) (original version: Los Angeles, California, 1925) | USA:72 min (1942 re-release) | USA:81 min (24 fps) (edited version: New York release, 1925)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System) (1942 re-issue) | Silent (original release)
Certification:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The part of Georgia (the showgirl) was originally written for Charles Chaplin's new wife Lita Grey, but she was replaced by Georgia Hale when she became pregnant.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Big Jim is so delirious that he thinks The Lone Prospector is a chicken, The Lone Prospector removes a knife from the table and hides it in the bed. In one of the next shots, the knife is back on the table. Then in the next shot it is gone again.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Tramp, Tramp, Tramp (1926)See more »

FAQ

Is this movie based on a novel?
See more »
53 out of 72 people found the following review useful.
Gold is the operative word here., 7 June 2004
Author: PhilipJames1980 from Annapolis, Maryland.

The Gold Rush is pure gold. It was Charlie Chaplin's third feature-length film, and marked his comeback of sorts following A Woman of Paris (1923), which he had directed to great critical acclaim but which had been unsuccessful at the box office because it lacked his signature character The Little Tramp.

This movie should be counted among Chaplin's best and most enduring works; many people name City Lights (which I've also seen) as THE best Chaplin movie, but The Gold Rush is still an excellent showcase for one of movie comedy's immortal geniuses.

Having first seen this movie years ago on TV, I saw it again in October 2003 as part of my college's silent-film class, on a poor-quality videotape that often prevented the other students and I from laughing at it because we could barely discern what was happening on the screen.

Even so, I was sufficiently intrigued to buy the GR Chaplin Collection DVD, which has a restored silent version of the film that is so good I haven't even bothered to watch the 1942 sound version that's also on the disc.

The viewing quality of this restored silent version is excellent, although certain minor details are still hard to see, such as the faces of the cards drawn by the Tramp, Jim McKay and Black Larsen as they try to determine who should go out into the blizzard. On the other hand, in the shot of the cabin teetering on the edge of the cliff, the viewing clarity makes clearly visible the wire used to pull the model cabin farther over the edge!

Also, the film seems to skip in the scene when the Tramp dances with Georgia, perhaps due to a transfer problem with the DVD. But these are minor complaints, and certainly the restoration allows for full appreciation of the film.

The first half-hour of The Gold Rush is in itself worth the purchase price, as it contains some of the funniest scenes I've ever seen in any movie. Even the throwaway bits, such as the Tramp trying to use a crude hand-drawn compass, are more genuinely funny than the extreme gross-out gags offered by most contemporary comedies.

And the shoe-eating scene is so famously funny that even people watching it for the first time may feel that they've seen it already: this is in no way a bad thing, but merely reflects the fact that the best silent films long ago entered into the collective memory of our culture.

I don't say this to sound pretentious. I believe that because Chaplin had such influence on the development of movie comedy, that to a certain extent people today may take him for granted. It's hard to approach his work with fresh eyes only because so many people have watched his movies for so many years.

For example, before the success of The Kid (1921), Chaplin's first feature film, the movie industry doubted that audiences would accept a film that blended comedy and drama. In The Gold Rush, Chaplin further explored cinema's potential to be comedy and drama simultaneously. Only he could have distilled humor from scenes of starvation and struggles to survive the ravings of a madman.

The joy of watching this film today stems from seeing how well Chaplin, as both star and director, finds and maintains the right tone and style for his work, negotiating the fine line between comedy and tragedy. This is most evident in the scene when McKay and Larsen struggle for the shotgun in the cabin and the Tramp tries desperately to escape the muzzle's aim: the sequence is undeniably hilarious, yet even today the Tramp's grim predicament is just as likely to horrify the viewer.

One pleasure of silent comedies such as The Gold Rush is that the lack of a soundtrack leaves more to the imagination, in the same manner that old-time radio comedy got laughs from funny sound effects that showed the audience nothing.

When Black Larsen sees the Tramp in the cabin, for example, he enters and slams the door, causing the Tramp to spin around in alarm. This is the kind of joke that could only work in a silent movie, because no door-slamming sound effect could be quite as funny as the piano score imitating the noise, as rendered by Neil Brand on the DVD.

The second act, in which the Tramp gives up prospecting, returns to town and becomes infatuated with Georgia, was probably inevitable, as Chaplin realized he couldn't sustain the entire film at the cabin. Still, he must have drawn much of his inspiration from that one location, because he returns his characters to the cabin in the film's third act.

I don't want to spoil the climax for anyone who hasn't seen it, but I believe that even today it remains one of the most vivid depictions in cinema history of man versus the elements, and Chaplin milked all its potential for comedy and suspense.

Mack Swain is hilarious as Jim McKay, creating a memorable comic image with his ridiculously small boots and high-domed fur coat. Chaplin generously gave him some opportunities to be funny on his own in this film, just as he was content to let Jackie Coogan share the spotlight in The Kid. From what I've seen of City Lights and Modern Times, he was not so generous in his later films, seeming to think that he himself was the whole show.

The Gold Rush may not be a perfect 10 compared to today's more sophisticated stories and special effects. The ending is cheerfully cynical, improbably reuniting two characters and never revealing Georgia's true feelings for the Tramp.

But the bottom line is that The Gold Rush is still funny after almost eighty years, and that's a feat few comedies in any year can ever accomplish. Chaplin, in his ability to extract maximum humor and poignancy from his material, has no equivalent today. What a shame.

Rating: 10 (One of the best movies of 1925.)

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Joe E Brown? slydog1227
the best movies of the 20's simblub
Your Top ten favorite silent films SakowskyBrothers
Rank the Chaplin silent (and near-silent) features ohio_jb
i so this movie right after i so the kid, and the kid its muuuuch better meirku
Why is this movie considered a 'Classic'? kassiquayle
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