Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
...
Charley
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Pierre Couderc
Jules Mendel
Marie Mosquini
Edit

Storyline

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Short

Edit

Details

Country:

Release Date:

1 February 1925 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
I'll drink to this
27 December 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Back when prohibition was in effect in the 1920s and early 1930s, it was very common to see comedies use bootleg as a catalyst for comedy situations, and many use drunkenness as a way to generate laughs. See Laurel and Hardy's excellent short "Blotto." This isn't surprising, since seeing people do forbidden, alluring things and, often, make fools of themselves in the process, is always a mine for comedy.

Here we see Charley Chase's take on that pervasive comedy trope of the time, through the unlikely circumstance that his boss stored his bootleg hooch in an office water cooler. Chase may not be spinning everything here out of his own imagination, but even as he uses the stock drunkenness plot from countless comedies of this era, it becomes thoroughly a Charley Chase comedy. The drunkenness is a way of moving Charley's character along in a comedy of character and situation.

There is good office comedy in a beginning with Charley as a meek worker tormented by practical jokes from women he is afraid to talk to. After the drunk Charley does not just get a chance to show off a drunk act (which he does well) but also gains the courage to approach his secret love, developing plot and character, and opening more comedy possibilities that are distinctly Charley Chase. Even a gag involving confusing a mannequin of a woman's leg for the real thing, used so many times by Charley's fellow comedian Harry Langdon, is worked into the compact comedy of embarrassment.

A very funny film, showing how handily Charley Chase could take a common stock idea and make it into something very much his own.


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?