MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 9,725 this week

The Living Dead Man (1926)
"Feu Mathias Pascal" (original title)

6.9
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 6.9/10 from 145 users  
Reviews: 4 user | 6 critic

Mathias Pascal, only son of a once rich family, marries beautiful Romalinda, who has a terrible mother-in-law. She controls her daughter, and soon his home life becomes a nightmare, as well... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(scenario), (novel)
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 1001 titles
created 21 Apr 2012
 
a list of 104 titles
created 31 Mar 2013
 
a list of 476 titles
created 6 months ago
 
list image
a list of 204 titles
created 3 months ago
 
a list of 1002 titles
created 2 months ago
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Living Dead Man (1926)

The Living Dead Man (1926) on IMDb 6.9/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Living Dead Man.
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Ivan Mozzhukhin ...
Mathias Pascal (as Ivan Mosjoukine)
Marcelle Pradot ...
Lois Moran ...
Marthe Mellot ...
Pauline Carton ...
Tante Scholastique
Irma Perrot ...
Barsac ...
Veuve Pescatore (as M. Barsac)
...
Isaure Douvan ...
Pierre Batcheff ...
Scipion
Georges Térof ...
L'amoureux du 12, un joueur
Philippe Hériat ...
L'aide assesseur
Jean Hervé ...
Chev Terence Papiano
Solange Sicard ...
Edit

Storyline

Mathias Pascal, only son of a once rich family, marries beautiful Romalinda, who has a terrible mother-in-law. She controls her daughter, and soon his home life becomes a nightmare, as well as his job as assistant librarian in his home town. His only moments of lights are his mother and his baby, but both die on the same day. Shocked he leaves his hometown and gets to Monte Carlo, where he wins a fortune at the Casino. Returning home, he reads his own obituary in a paper. They have found a corpse in a creek and connected it with his disappearance. Mathias, noticing that he now is free from all ties to his old live, decides to start a new one, and goes to Rome, where he rents a room in a pension full of fake spiritualists who are controlling the owner. The chief of the gang, Terence, wants to marry the owner's daughter Adrienne, and has convinced her father to give her to him, with no regards of Adrienne's feelings, who is in love with and loved by Mathias. When Terence steals Mathias ... Written by Stephan Eichenberg <eichenbe@fak-cbg.tu-muenchen.de>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

based on novel

Genres:

Drama | Horror

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

12 February 1926 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Feu Mathias Pascal  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(tinted)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Remade as Le due vite di Mattia Pascal (1985) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Magical Mosjoukine!
15 October 2004 | by (Edinburgh, Scotland) – See all my reviews

The White Russian exile Ivan Mosjoukine was arguably the greatest male star of the silent screen. Imagine an actor who combined the matinée idol looks of John Barrymore with the smoldering sexual magnetism of Valentino, the deft physical comedy of Chaplin with the dark Gothic creepiness of Lon Chaney. It sounds impossible, of course - unless you've seen Mosjoukine in action. One glance from those hypnotic, liquid eyes holds more power than all the others combined.

Indeed, there's a strong case for Mosjoukine as the greatest actor in screen history. His stylised High Romantic playing has dated far less in 80 years than the Actor's Studio tricks of Brando and de Niro have dated in half that time. To see him in his great roles - and Matthias Pascal is one of those - is to feel time itself dissolve through the camera's lens. Mosjoukine, like Garbo, is one of a handful of screen stars whose work on celluloid has the immediacy of live performance.

As a vehicle for Mosjoukine and his brilliance, The Late Matthias Pascal is one of the all-time greats. He starts off as an adolescent dreamer, last survivor of a ruined of a ruined aristocratic dynasty (much like Mosjoukine's own family in post-Revolutionary Russia). Blundering his way into marriage, he becomes a harassed and penniless family man, weighed down by wife, baby and the original Mother-In-Law From Hell. Only the awfulness of his home life allows him to tolerate his job - catching rats at the local library, whose mouldering piles of books resemble the last scene of Citizen Kane!

Tragedy strikes, and Matthias runs away. Instantly, his luck changes. Winning a fortune at the Casino in Monte Carlo, he moves on to Rome - where he appears as a young gentleman of fashion. Soon enough, he falls in love with a young girl played by Lois Moran. An infatuation of F. Scott Fitzgerald and the model for Rosemanry in Tender Is the Night, Moran is similarly idealised in this film. Naturally, Matthias longs to do the decent thing and marry her. Yet he faces the same dilemma as most of Pirandello's heroes. If he isn't himself, who on Earth is he?

As a work of cinema, The Late Matthias Pascal is not as spectacularly dotty as L'Herbier's 1924 masterpiece L'Inhumaine. It is also perhaps a shade too long. Yet its bravura sequences - the library, the casino, the dream sequences where Matthias is haunted by his 'dead' double - show L'Herbier as an unjustly neglected genius, worthy of a place next to Lang and von Stroheim in Film Studies 101. His spectacular use of real-life locations is unusual for the 20s. But Mosjoukine is the most spectacular sight of all!


11 of 15 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Who plays the piano music in this movie? Mme_Jannings
Too Long kerrydragon
Discuss The Living Dead Man (1926) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?