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Battleship Potemkin (1925) More at IMDbPro »Bronenosets Potemkin (original title)


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2004

19 items from 2014


Watch This Sick Filth! 15 Controversial Scenes from a Century of Censorship

12 hours ago | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Each week HeyUGuys will take a primary focus on the site. This could be a genre of movie, an aspect of the industry, a specific person or part of the movie making process we want to explore further. This week our focus is the divisive issue of film censorship. We began with a debate of the necessity of the BBFC, continued with Beth Webb’s  exploration of the censorial milestones we have passed so far. Today Cai Ross lists the scenes which caused the censors a headache, from Eisenstein to The Exorcist. Tomorrow we’ll close out the week looking forward to the future of film censorship.

In 1903, a 49 second long documentary called Cheese Mites became the first film to be banned in Great Britain. UK cheesemakers (blessed as they were) feared that this microscopically-shot image of grubby-looking mites going about their filthy business upon a wedge of stilton, would »

- Cai Ross

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Greenaway plans second Eisenstein film

12 August 2014 4:27 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Peter Greenaway is to return to the legendary Russian film director Sergey Eisenstein for a second feature, The Eisenstein Handshakes, this time to be located in Switzerland, after the Mexican-set Eisenstein in Guanajato.

Greenaway was in Locarno’s neighbouring town of Ascona on Monday to make an appearance at a showcase of Soviet and Russian films presented by the state film archive Gosfilmofond.

¨During our investigations on Eisenstein [for Eisenstein In Guanajato], we discovered two extraordnary things which make it very relevant to Switzerland,¨ Greenaway explained.

¨The very first film festival in world was created in 1929 in La Sarraz, close to the French border, and it was attended by many important experimental film-makers of the time. And the most important guest was Eisenstein who came to Switzerland with his assistant Alexandrov and his wonderful cameraman Tissé.

¨But what is also extraordinary is that the very first film ever made in Switzerland was directed by Eisenstein, so we have »

- screen.berlin@googlemail.com (Martin Blaney)

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Film Review: ‘Paradiso’

31 July 2014 5:55 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A superb sense of space and a respectful appreciation for incongruity are major selling points for “Paradiso,” Omar A. Razzak’s low-budget docu about Madrid’s last porn cinema. It’s rare enough to find such a leftover in the Internet age, yet even more unusual is the manager at the Sala X Duque de Alba, a guy who decorates the lobby with auteurist posters and buys ties for his regulars at Christmas. Having earned the trust of his subjects, Razzak sets up his observational camera to favor off-center (in many ways) framings, creating a winning if slight crowdpleaser for Hispanophone showcases.

It takes some time to work out what kinds of movies are being shown at the Duque de Alba, since the camera never enters the screening room. From the lobby, decorated with posters for films like “Slumdog Millionaire,” “All About My Mother” and “Man on the Moon,” audiences »

- Jay Weissberg

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Looking back at Bill Murray's lost sci-fi movie

11 July 2014 3:43 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Nothing Lasts Forever is a 1984 sci-fi movie with Zach Galligan and Bill Murray that disappeared. Yet it's resurfaced.

Feature

I love a good quest. There’s nothing that drives a plot quite like it, from Jason setting out to find the Golden Fleece to Indiana Jones’ determination to track down the Ark of the Covenant. Along the way there is always action, and adventure, and some friends to meet and enemies to defeat. Because that’s how a quest works.

Quests don’t have to be about objects. They can also be about finding your place in the world, and Nothing Lasts Forever tells the story of Adam Beckett, a young man who wants to be an artist, even though he has no idea of what an artist actually is. His quest takes him to a strange, totalitarian Manhattan where wannabe artists must sit a practical exam, and eventually to some very surprising places, »

- sarahd

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A Selection of the Ten Best Edited Sequences of All-Time

9 July 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Obviously to attempt to list the ten best edited sequences of all-time is a fool's errand so let's just consider the following video, excellently compiled and discussed by the CineFix crew, to be a presentation of some of the best edited sequences so as to not start a slew of "you forgot" comments. I, for one, could never begin to even remember all the best edited sequences in cinema's long history, which is perhaps why CineFix's ten selections are among the most popular and undoubtedly the most highly influential and talked about of all-time from Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, a pair from Alfred Hitchcock, another pair from Francis Ford Coppola including The Godfather and, obviously, Sergei M. Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin. For my money I'd add The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, Citizen Kane and a personal favorite, Godard's Breathless as I feel the editing in »

- Brad Brevet

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The Definitive War Movies: 10-1

2 July 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Here we are, at the top of the mountain. We’ve had plenty from every war imaginable, some supportive of war efforts, some not. But the more interesting war films really focus on the people; the internal struggles those men and women have about what they are doing. Whether made in America, Germany, the United Kingdom, or anywhere else, war is not just a battle between good and evil. It’s a life and death struggle between opposing sides that may not be that different. The movies at the top of this list may be subtle or straightforward, but each of them is a clear snapshot that lets audiences see what it means to fight, so they don’t have to.

10. Paths of Glory (1957)

Directed by: Stanley Kurbick

Conflict: World War I

Before Stanley Kubrick grabbed the rights, the source material for Paths of Glory had a long history. The novel, »

- Joshua Gaul

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Critical Mass: Come for the Transformers, stay for the critics' zingers

27 June 2014 2:00 PM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Critics have long given Michael Bay and his Transformers franchise the high hat—but after more than $2.7 billion in box office across the globe, the filmmaker can basically thumb his nose at the naysayers who sniff at his brand of CG rock-em, sock-em spectacle. The fourth film, Transformers: The Age of Extinction, is both a sequel and a reboot, with Mark Wahlberg coming aboard to anchor the franchise as a poor Texas inventor who accidentally salvages the remnants of Optimus Prime and gets entangled in a city-leveling war between good and bad alien ‘bots, as well as the secret »

- Jeff Labrecque

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Report from Ukraine: The Odessa International Film Festival

30 May 2014 11:30 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

It’s never easy to pull off a successful film festival, but current conditions in Ukraine have made it nearly impossible. Five years ago, when organizers initiated an annual summer event in Odessa, the Ukrainian film industry was developing and the first festival rather small. But the Odessa International Film Festival grew quickly, reportedly beyond its organizers’ expectations, and began to receive the attention of the international film community, particularly in Europe. Now the Potemkin steps made immortal by Eisenstein are the site of outdoor screenings of classic films like (of course) Battleship Potemkin and the in-competition feature films have swollen by 140%, besides […] »

- Randy Astle

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Transilvania expands industry offering

30 May 2014 3:19 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

A gala open-air screening of Stephen FrearsPhilomena  will tonight (May 30) launch the Transilvania International Film Festival (Tiff) which is expanding its industry dimension for its 13th edition.

This weekend will see the festival focusing its attention on the ¨Save The Big Screen¨ campaign, launched under the auspices of Romania Film Promotion, which aims to halt the disappearance of cinemas outside of the main centres of population and create a network of digital cinemas throughout the country.

A conference will be held on May 31 bringing together officials from the Ministry of Culture, local authorities, Romania Film, cinema managers, film-makers and foreign guests such as Marta Materska-Samek, from Poland’s Cinema Development Foundation Bard, Ivo Andrle of Czech exhibitor Aero Films, and Tina Hajon, Head of Exhibition at the Croatian Audiovisual Centre.

Debate will centre, for example, on the foreign guests’ experiences of accessing European funds for cinema renovation and digitisation programmes, as well as »

- screen.berlin@googlemail.com (Martin Blaney)

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Gladiator Live at the Royal Albert Hall: Swords, sandals and a stunning score

29 May 2014 5:17 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

We've banged on in the past about how 'silent film' was never really silent. But when we finally cracked the challenge of joining sound and pictures, live accompaniment naturally fell by the wayside.

It's made something of a niche comeback for revivals of silent movies - from the Pet Shop Boys doing Battleship Potemkin to Minima taking on Nosferatu - and in recent years there's also been an increasing amount of live accompaniment to the talkies.

Asian Dub Foundation made a splash with their 2001 live score for La Haine and the Royal Albert Hall has become the venue of choice for full orchestral concerts alongside a screening. There can be few better examples of how wonderfully this can work than Gladiator, Ridley Scott's 2000 epic.

We're not here to review the film. You know the (ahem) score. But to quickly summarise: They don't make 'em like they used to, except »

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A Look Back at the Cannes Palme D’or Winners from the 60s: ‘O Pagador de Promessas’

19 May 2014 3:26 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

O Pagador de Promessas

Written and directed by Anselmo Duarte

Brazil, 1962

Looking back, there were some stiff competition for the top prize at the 1962 Cannes Film Festival. Among the entrants were films by great directors like Sidney Lumet, Otto Preminger, and Robert Bresson. There were great, now canonical works such as Antonioni’s L’Eclisse, Buñuel’s The Exterminating Angel, and Agnès Varda’s Cleo From 5 to 7 – movies still watched and loved by cinephiles today. However, none of these films won the Palme d’Or of 1962, as it was instead awarded to O Pagador de Promessas, a Brazilian film based on a stage play of the same title. O Pagador de Promessas would go on to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Film, providing Oscar representation for the first time for not only Brazil but the entire South American continent. Despite the film’s accolades »

- Jae K. Renfrow

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A Look Back at the Cannes Palme D’or Winners from the 60s: ‘O Pagador de Promessas’

18 May 2014 5:06 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

O Pagador de Promessas

Written and directed by Anselmo Duarte

Brazil, 1962

Looking back, there were some stiff competition for the top prize at the 1962 Cannes Film Festival. Among the entrants were films by great directors like Sidney Lumet, Otto Preminger, and Robert Bresson. There were great, now canonical works such as Antonioni’s L’Eclisse, Buñuel’s The Exterminating Angel, and Agnès Varda’s Cleo From 5 to 7 – movies still watched and loved by cinephiles today. However, none of these films won the Palme d’Or of 1962, as it was instead awarded to O Pagador de Promessas, a Brazilian film based on a stage play of the same title. O Pagador de Promessas would go on to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Film, providing Oscar representation for the first time for not only Brazil but the entire South American continent. Despite the film’s accolades »

- Jae K. Renfrow

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Top Ten Brian De Palma Climaxes

13 May 2014 9:05 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

This piece naturally reveals the end of every film  mentioned. You have been warned.

What is most exciting about the pure joy of watching a Brian De Palma film usually comes as far away from subtext as one can get. Very few filmmakers can stage a major setpiece in their climax where the visceral excitement is derived largely from happenstance and character quirks. A whole chase scene is nearly derailed simply due to a fat guy’s asthma; a car is left out in a storm with the reverse still on; even in a deleted scene, the entire resolution to one film was the result of a sudden, giant Atlantic City wave.

10. Scarface

Much derided by those not in the hip-hop industry as a shameless, bloated excess, Scarface is arguably best remembered for a shootout finale as gratuitous as a mountain of cocaine. It’s so over the top, audiences »

- Kenny Hedges

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Watch: Explore 'The Motion Picture Camera: Past, Present And Future' With 4-Minute Video

25 April 2014 8:32 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Much has been made in recent years about the film industry’s transition from shooting photochemically to shooting digitally but what’s often missed in the discussion about changing formats is how the camera itself has always been in a state of flux. To that point, a new video from The Society of Camera Operators takes us through cinematic history, focusing on the tools that filmmakers have used to record iconic images. From “Battleship Potemkin” to “2001: A Space Odyssey” to “Skyfall,” the four-minute long video tracks the camera as it changes forms throughout the century from large static boxes to behemoths shooting in VistaVision to the Red Epic and even iPhones. It’s a great and surprisingly touching tribute to the machines that are used to create something decidely un-machine-like. Outside of getting lost in a Wikipedia blackhole or stopping by New York’s Museum of the Moving Image, »

- Cain Rodriguez

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10 reasons to look forward to Snowpiercer

17 April 2014 7:26 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Top 10 Ryan Lambie 22 Apr 2014 - 06:45

A hit in South Korea and France, Snowpiercer is still awaiting release in the Us and UK. Here's why you should look forward to it...

For a while there, it looked as though South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's Snowpiercer would never get an official English-language release at all. Late last year, it emerged that Bong's ambitious science fiction film had been picked up for release in English-speaking countries by The Weinstein Company. When the Weinsteins, true to form, voiced their desire to produce a shorter version of Snowpiercer, the director understandably dug his heels in and refused to budge.

For several months, Snowpiercer hung in limbo, even as its release in territories like South Korea and France saw great financial returns and rave reviews. But in February this year, it was announced that Snowpiercer would be coming out after all, and oddly, in »

- ryanlambie

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The HeyUGuys Interview: Stelio Savante on Peter Greenaway’s Eisenstein, and his career

28 March 2014 7:00 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

HeyUGuys recently caught up with Stelio Savante who following his lead role in the first film ever to shoot in Equatorial Guinea Where the Road Runs Out,  also has a supporting role in Peter Greenaway’s upcoming film Eisenstein in Guanajuato.

Between Greenaway and making history, we felt privileged to have an opportunity to discuss with Savante his career to date, which apparently all began thanks to some good looking girls. In an interview mixed with seriousness and humour he spoke of discovering cinema in his native South Africa, the difference between cinema in American and South African culture, working with J.J. Abrams, and the rewards of collaboration.

———–

Why a career in acting? Was there that one inspirational moment?

Getting paid to do something that I’m passionate about… how could I refuse that? Performing plays in university… I got the bug, it bite hard, and so a journey was born. »

- Paul Risker

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'The Hidden Fortress' (Criterion Collection) Blu-ray Review

12 March 2014 10:16 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

It seems whenever Akira Kurosawa's The Hidden Fortress is mentioned it is invariably linked to George Lucas and Star Wars. The connection has been discussed for many years, perhaps best kept alive by an interview with Lucas discussing the film and its influence, which has first released on the 2001 Criterion DVD release. The interview is included once again on this new Blu-ray re-release of the film in which Lucas says the main influence Hidden Fortress had on Star Wars was the decision to tell the story from the perspective of the narrative's two lowliest characters. In the case of Star Wars that would be C-3Po and R2-D2, in Hidden Fortress it's a pair of bumbling and greedy peasants who stumble upon a general (Toshiro Mifune) and a princess (Misa Uehara) attempting to smuggle royal treasure across enemy lines. You could point to the use of long lenses, wipes »

- Brad Brevet

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New Greenaway film begins shoot

4 February 2014 2:34 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

First images released of period drama Eisenstein In Guanajuato.

Peter Greenaway, the British director of more than 50 films including The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover, has started shooting his new film, Eisenstein in Guanajuato.

The feature centres on legendary filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein - the director of Battleship Potemkin - with Finnish actor Elmer Bäck (The Spiral) playing the title role.

Mexican actor Luis Alberti plays the role of his guide (Palomino Cañedo), South African actor Stelio Savante is Hunter S Kimbrough and Lisa Owen plays Mary Craig Sinclair.

The international co-production is led by producers Bruno Felix and Femke Wolting from Submarine and San Fu Maltha from Fu Works. The entire film will be shot in Guanajuato, Mexico.

France’s Rezo Film is the film’s sales agent and it is expected to receive a theatrical release in September 2014.

The film shows how Russian-born Eisenstein spent ten days in Guanajuato, Mexico, in 1931, during »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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12 Fantastic Films You Only Remember For One Scene

25 January 2014 3:01 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Disney/Pixar

It may stand as one of the most influential films in the history of cinema, but can you remember a scene from Battleship Potemkin that wasn’t the massacre on the Odessa steps? Likewise Nosferatu; over ninety years on, is there a more iconic image than Count Orlok’s shadow creeping upstairs into Ellen’s room?

This list isn’t necessarily a rundown of twelve films’ most famous scenes, the moments that linger long after the closing credits have crawled up the screen and the lights have blinked back into life. No, these are the sequences that elevate a good film into a great one. But these flashes of brilliance often come at a cost; so sudden, shocking or spectacular are their arrivals that they can inadvertently provide an early peak. In fact, they can become the only scene you associate with the film.

For filmmakers, this is something of a mixed blessing. »

- Dan Wakefield

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2004

19 items from 2014


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