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The Arab (1924)

Jamil (Ramon Novarro) is a soldier in the Bedouin defence forces during a war between Syria and Turkey, who has deserted his regiment. In a remote village, he encounters an orphan asylum ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
...
...
Max Maxudian ...
The Governor
Jean de Limur ...
Hossein
Paul Vermoyal ...
Iphraim
Adelqui Migliar ...
Abdullah
...
Oulad Nile (as Alexandresco)
Justa Uribe ...
Myrza
Jerrold Robertshaw ...
Dr. Hilbert
Paul Franceschi ...
Marmount
Giuseppe di Campo ...
Selim
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Hayde Chikly
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Storyline

Jamil (Ramon Novarro) is a soldier in the Bedouin defence forces during a war between Syria and Turkey, who has deserted his regiment. In a remote village, he encounters an orphan asylum run by American missionaries Dr. Hilbert (Jerrold Robertshaw) and his daughter Mary (Alice Terry). The village is attacked by the Turks, and its ruler, eager to placate the invaders, intends to hand over the children for slaughter; he disguises his intents under a move to Damascus for their safety. The Bedouins arrive at the scene, and reveal that Jamil is the son of the tribal leader. With his father's revealed death, Jamil's he becomes the new leader of the tribe, which endows him with a sense of responsibility. Risking his own life, he proceeds to save the children, defeating the Turks and the local leader in the process (and winning the girl). Written by Dariush.Alipour

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Plot Keywords:

melodrama | based on play | See All (2) »

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Thousands of tribesmen in the tremendous mob scenes screened in Algiers and Tunis

Genres:

Drama

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Details

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Release Date:

21 July 1924 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Araber  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Phil Whitman was originally meant to shoot the film alongside John F. Seitz but was unable at the last minute to travel to the African shooting location. See more »

Connections

Version of The Barbarian (1933) See more »

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