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The Third Alarm (1922)

Fireman Dan McDowell has been taking care of the fire horses for many years, but when the department becomes motorized, the beloved horses are sold off. Efforts to train Dan to drive the new fire trucks fail, and he's forced to retire.

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Cast

Cast overview:
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Dan McDowell
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Johnny McDowell
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June Rutherford
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Richard Morris ...
Dr. Rutherford
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Alice McDowell
Frankie Lee ...
Little Jimmie
Wilbur Higby ...
Chief Andrews
Bullet the Horse ...
Bullet
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Storyline

Fireman Dan McDowell has been taking care of the fire horses for many years, but when the department becomes motorized, the beloved horses are sold off. Efforts to train Dan to drive the new fire trucks fail, and he's forced to retire.

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Drama

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December 1922 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Det tredie Signal  »

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1.33 : 1
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Trivia

A print of this film survives in the UCLA Film and Television Archives. See more »

Connections

Version of The Third Alarm (1930) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A spectacular movie!
9 September 2014 | by See all my reviews

By cobbling together the best footage from multiple 16mm prints, Grapevine have done Emory Johnson proud in this splendid tinted presentation of one of the producer/director's most spectacular movies, The Third Alarm. In my opinion, this version is superior to the 1930 version which Emory Johnson re-made with James Hall, Anita Louise and Jean Hersholt in the roles here played Johnnie Walker, Ella Hall and Ralph Lewis. The incident-packed story was written by the director's mother, Emilie Johnson. Fortunately, both the Johnsons had access to the real fire-fighters and were able to commandeer some really spectacular fire footage. Admittedly, for a while there it looked as if the Johnsons were going to go overboard on sentiment, but they change their collective minds to build up a really nail-biting scenario instead. The special effects are outstanding. Admittedly, any viewer who isn't moved by sentiment won't find The Third Alarm as thrilling as I did. But for me, the film offered really grand entertainment. The whole cast was totally convincing and should be firmly congratulated, but particularly Ralph Lewis who plays the lead in a thoroughly convincing style. Fine photography by Henry Sharp is also a considerable asset. The movie was expertly produced by Emory Johnson on a spectacular budget. Sources differ as to whether the original theatrical version had six or seven reels, but the five-reel Kodascope cutdown was one of that library's most popular movies – and no wonder! This five-reel version is now available on an excellent DVD from Grapevine.


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