IMDb > Nosferatu (1922) > Reviews & Ratings - IMDb
Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Reviews & Ratings for
Nosferatu More at IMDbPro »Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (original title)

Filter: Hide Spoilers:
Page 7 of 35: [Prev][2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [Next]
Index 345 reviews in total 

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

"Why did you kill such pretty flowers?!"

7/10
Author: Lauh from Portugal
27 January 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I really enjoyed this movie, specially because most of the scenes must have been really hard to make in 1922. However, I liked so much of Bram Stoker's "Dracula" that I was expecting a lot more from this (maybe I actually forgot this was made in German in 1922 and I shouldn't have). However, I did find Nosferatu creepy at times, specially Max Schreck character. He was just perfect for the role. None the less being a masterpiece, I really wished the story was more loyal to "Dracula": in the end everything ends up fine, in the movie Ellen dies. Also, I missed Van Helsing very much: I was always expecting for him to appear. Maybe I shouldn't think so much in the "inspired by Dracula" sentence: after all, it's an 1922 adaptation. For everybody who is wondering if this movie is worth watching: yes, it is. It's extraordinary how Murnau was able to film all this and still make it feel real.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

The film that brought one of German cinema's masters to international attention.

9/10
Author: G K from Mars
6 July 2010

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Count Dracula (Max Schreck) goes to Bremen and is destroyed by sunlight. This was the first and last Prana Film; the company declared bankruptcy after Bram Stoker's estate, acting for his widow, Florence Stoker, sued for copyright infringement and won.

Nosferatu is an unauthorised treatment of the Bram Stoker novel, with a terrifying Count and several genuinely chilling moments. Schreck is extraordinary, the film dutifully terrifies - and director F.W. Murnau ended up in the embrace of Hollywood. Werner Herzog's 1979 homage to Nosferatu, Nosferatu the Vampyre starred Klaus Kinski as Count Dracula, not Orlok.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Horror

9/10
Author: JackBenjamin from NYC
23 March 2009

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

The images in this film are deeply frightening. Modern depictions of the vampire, at the behest of the studios no doubt, are of handsome, charming gentlemen who, even when they shift at night to monster form, retain grace and appeal. Nosferatu is a horror.

I think the best way to approach art is, in Harold Bloom's terms, to read it outward from within. There's a danger in trying to see a work in a social context because you're starting from a false focal point, one you've yourself ordained as critical. That said, I think it's hard to read any film that came out of 1922 Germany outside the context of WWI. One of the most meaningless, mindless, devastating events in human history, and Murnau is very much the Nosferatu who rose from the grave to tell the tale of those undead, survivors in a changed world -- after all, how could life ever have been the same after the war; no, it must assume some new, unspeakable, unnatural and abominable form.

The meek beast notwithstanding, other memorable images for me include that establishing shot of the ship at sea (I don't think I've seen this imitated since, which is surprising); the clever intercutting of Ellen's sleepwalk with the trolling vampire a sea away; the shadow of his clawed hand crawling up her nightgown; the reverse negative of the frantic carriage; the fast-motion current of the nighttime river; the extreme longshot of the townspeople chasing the scarecrow (and Murnau's clever use of the iris to simulate a gargantuan setting sun) -- all images that play with the notion of time and how it manipulates nature and vice versa, which, to me, is the most intriguing aspect of the vampire myth.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

what a horror

8/10
Author: ricedanielle from United States
7 December 2008

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

This film is both horrifying and comical. The make up used on the vampire is amazing. His ears look like they belong on an elf and his skin is extremely pale. His teeth look like they can be real even though they are all pointy and some rotted. The one make-up touch that is most interesting is his fingers. His fingers are abnormally long which makes his hunched over body even more awkward looking. One could think he wouldn't be able to pick anything up with them, yet he carries around his own coffin everywhere he goes. Thats the comical part of the movie (when he carries his coffin) the music that is played as he walks sometimes makes it almost impossible to stay serious.

Some of the most interesting shots are those in which you see nothing but his shadows. When the monster is suppose to be walking up the stairs all you can see is the shadow of his long skeletal body and fingers.

His look itself is just scary to think about. When he is on the ship walking and his body rises up. The first thing that comes to mind is " keep that thing far away from me" With his eyes bulging out of his head and his intense stair it seems as if the vampire is going to walk directly out of the screen. Moments like this occur all throughout the film. Its a good movie for someone to watch if they want to both be slightly frightened yet laugh a few times.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Eerie...

8/10
Author: TheFiendsThatPlagueThee from United States
1 November 2008

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

FW Murnau's Nosferatu is a very different adaptation of the Dracula story than Browning's later and more popular version. While Bela Lugosi is a suave, dignified and seductive vampire, Max Schreck is much more repulsive and foul feeling in his portrayal of the undead creature. And it is interesting to see the differences in vision and style that the two directors took for essentially the same story.

Nosferatu is an impressive film with an air of dread and this sense of repulsion that clings to it for the duration of the movie. The use of light and shadow and interesting direction and camera work contribute to the atmosphere here. The scene where the shadow of the vampire is seen slowly progressing up the stairs with exaggerated and distorted form leaves a lasting impression on the viewer, as do various other manifestations of the vampire-for instance, when he is seen rising from a supine position without any part of his body bending.

While overall I think I prefer Browning's Dracula, Nosferatu is an impressive film that is certainly worth seeing.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

The Great-Granddady of Vampire Films

Author: JoeytheBrit from www.moviemoviesite.com
30 September 2008

This one's the great-Grandaddy of vampire movies and still packs quite a wallop, even though its impact is severely diminished on a second viewing when the story starts to drag – which is never a good thing for an 80-minute film.

Those iconic images of Max Schreck, silhouetted against the rigging of the ship whose crew he has systematically devoured, rising stiff-backed from his coffin, climbing the stairs to his victim's room, his talon-like nails and misshapen head, his ascent charted by the movement of his shadow on the wall, are so embedded in the psyche of any true movie fan that seeing them in their true context is a little like seeing a long-cherished hero in the flesh. Trouble is, by the second or third viewing, images of Paul Whitehouse's 'monster, monster' take-off inevitably start taking over. The film is quite faithful to Bram Stoker's novel, but there is only fundamental attention paid to character development, and the guy who plays Jonathon Harker (the subtitles of the version I watched referred to the characters by the names given to them by Stoker) is truly irritating. His acting style of exaggerated gestures was out-dated even in 1922. Max Shreck, however, barely on screen for more than 10- minutes, elevates the film to another dimension.

Watch it once and remember it for its initial impact, otherwise you're likely to be disappointed if you return for a second bite.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Beware of Sub-Par DVD Releases

7/10
Author: Martin_Niese from Chicago
17 March 2008

Nosferatu should absolutely be respected for it's contribution to, and advancement of, the film industry and particularly horror movies. The film offers special effects that were cutting edge at the time and still maintain some of their power in creating terror and tension. The particular version I viewed wasn't good, so beware. My DVD rental was through Netflix and severely detracted from the film. There were no color filters added to this cut, which meant that I had to watch Nosferatu parade around in the daylight. Why did they film night scenes during the day anyway? Make sure you get a release that has the color filters added. The soundtrack varies from release to release as well. My version had a beautifully orchestrated symphonic masterpiece, that was at odds with what was being shown more often than not. All film students and true horror fans should see this film at least once to appreciate it's cinematic contributions, just beware of questionable release cutting.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

A Fine Example of German Expressionism and a Grotesque Twist on a Classic Tale

8/10
Author: Garrett Cypert from United States
15 November 2007

F.W. Murnau's Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Graunes is arguably one of the most horrific adaptations of Bram Stoker's Dracula ever produced for film. In order to better understand the reasons for my 8 out of 10 ranking, I will first explain how it's characteristics of expressionism make it fit in with other films released in Germany during the 1920s. Then, I will explain the most obvious and key difference between this film and other Dracula films. Finally, I will briefly describe how Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Graunes has withstood the test of time, on the screen and in the courtroom.

The period between about 1919 and the rise of the German Nazi movement in 1933 was a time of what is now known as The German Golden Age of film-making. Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Graunes is one of the landmark films made in Germany during this golden age. Of course, the beginning of the German Golden Age was when the horrifying masterpiece Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari was released in 1919. This was one of the first attempts at what is now called expressionism in film-making. Expressionism is defined as aesthetics in which ideas and feelings are shown through exaggerated elements in the image such as lighting, decor, and content. Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari took expressionism to the extreme with the use of carefully constructed indoor sets that made everything on screen seem distorted and anti-real. Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Graunes, released 3 years later, brought to its audience very exaggerated shots (extremely tall beds, misshapen windows, grotesque makeup, exaggerated shadows, etc.). But one of the main differences between Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Graunes and Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari is the amount of screen time that shows nature. Many of the expressionist shots in Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Graunes where outside, depicting some of the abnormalities in nature. This is an important element when discussing this film because it puts a rather disturbing twist on the natural world that contributes to a pessimistic air throughout the movie. For instance, when the hyena is shown, its simply unattractive appearance and disproportionate body adds to the film a sense that something is not quite right with the current situation. In most films it is a relief to see shots of trees or of the horizon, but Murnau proves with Nosferatu that this does not have to be necessarily true. Many of the most disquieting shots where actually shot outside for instance, the long shot of the castle, and the scarecrow shot. The expressionism in Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Graunes is obviously there, which puts this film rightfully so in the realm of the German Golden Age, which is characterized by a strong emphasis on expressionism.

Next, it is important to realize that one of the foremost reasons that this film has become such a memorable film is because it does not show Dracula as he is usually depicted. This unauthorized version of the 1897 novel does not portray the count as a handsome, deceiving man. Instead, the antagonist (Count Orlok as he is called instead of Dracula because it is an unofficial adaptation of the novel) is as ugly and unattractive as a count can be. With his rat-like appearance, Max Schreck certainly gives the movie a dark feel. Just the appearance of this Orlok on the screen is enough to scare viewers, even if he is not actually doing something horrific while on screen. Schreck is simply horrifying to watch. If someone is on screen for no more than 10 minutes total and can have an entire movie made around their character, they must me one sick looking puppy.

As stated above, Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Graunes is an UNOFFICIAL adaptation of Bram Stoker's original Dracula novel. I think that because of this, Count Orlok has been created into this sort of rebellious icon that seems to constantly lurk (much as he does on the actual film) behind all of the other, "pretty-boy" vampires. Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Graunes has become a sort of cult classic not only because of its extreme appearance of the count himself, but also because of the persecution it has endured over the past century. The Prana-Film Company declared bankruptcy after Bram Stoker's estate acted for his widow, Florence Stoker, and sued for copyright infringement. The Stoker estate won the case and the court ordered all existing prints of Nosferatu destroyed. Luckily, copies of the film had already been distributed around the world. These prints were then copied over the years, helping Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Graunes gain its current reputation as one of the greatest movie adaptations of the vampire legend. When most people think of silent horror films, their minds immediately recall that horrifying image of Count Orlok towering in the doorway of a dimly lit room or rising from his casket staring forebodingly into the camera.

Through the use of deliberate expressionism, alterations of a classic story, and a nasty battle in lawsuits, Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Graunes proves that it is a must-see film for any true movie fan.

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

A silent horror classic!

9/10
Author: Electrified_Voltage from Guelph, Ontario, Canada
26 June 2007

I remember seeing this unauthorized 1922 adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel, "Dracula" (or at least some of it) years ago, but at that point, I was only around nine years old, and it wouldn't have meant much to me at all. However, over a decade later, I watched the entire film, and even though it was my first time ever sitting down on my own to watch a silent movie, meaning that I wasn't exactly used to watching films from this era, I was still VERY impressed with this particular one!

Jonathon Harker is a resident in the town of Bremen in 1838, where he lives with his wife, Nina. For a living, he works as a real estate agent. One day, Harker is sent by his strange employer, R.M. Renfield, on a long journey to the Carpathian Mountains, where he is to complete a sale with the mysterious Count Orlok, who has sent a letter showing interest in purchasing a house in Bremen. On Harker's way to Count Orlok's castle, he comes to a nearby inn. Here, he looks in a book called "The Book of the Vampires", but does not believe any of the frightening things it says. However, after Harker reaches his destination, he eventually learns the horrifying truth about Count Orlok, and much trouble lies ahead for Harker, his wife, and the whole town of Bremen!

It has now been more than eight decades since the release of "Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens" (a.k.a. "Nosferatu"). Some movies from this long ago haven't aged very well as time has gone by, but "Nosferatu" is clearly one that has! For today's viewers, it can still be very scary (as horror movies are supposed to be) and highly entertaining for fans of the horror genre! So, if you're into horror flicks, then unless you simply dislike films from the silent era in general, I see no reason why you shouldn't watch this groundbreaking 1922 classic!

Was the above review useful to you?

1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

His face still scares me shitless

9/10
Author: (tyranid_slayer) from United Kingdom
18 May 2007

I'd never really watched black ans white horror movies before. But this was on in the day time. So i sat and watched it apart from being highly entertained nosferatu did scare the living daylights out of me.

The whole film years later is a landmark horror movie despite the court drama that went with the copright of Dracula and bram stokers wife. Although the 20's was when the film was still in infancy. This was a benchmark in horror. His face is known through out the world and scares little kids despite how old it is.

This is a classic example of how some movies can still be good or even brilliant no matter how old they may be. Nosferatu will give anyone nighmares.

Was the above review useful to you?


Page 7 of 35: [Prev][2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [Next]

Add another review


Related Links

Plot summary Plot synopsis Ratings
Awards Newsgroup reviews External reviews
Parents Guide Official site Plot keywords
Main details Your user reviews Your vote history