IMDb > Nanook of the North (1922)
Nanook of the North
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Nanook of the North (1922) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   6,779 votes »
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Down 33% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
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View company contact information for Nanook of the North on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
11 June 1922 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A story of life and love in the actual Arctic. See more »
Plot:
In this silent predecessor to the modern documentary, film-maker Robert J. Flaherty spends one year following the lives of Nanook and his family, Inuit living in the Arctic Circle. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 win See more »
User Reviews:
Powerful and memorable even after 80 years! See more (29 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)
Allakariallak ... Nanook (as Nanook)
Nyla ... Herself - Nanook's Wife - the Smiling One
Allee ... Himself - Nanook's Son
Cunayou ... Herself - Nanook's Wife
Allegoo ... Himself - Nanook's Son
Camock ... Himself - Nanook's Cat
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Berry Kroeger ... Narrator (1939 re-release) (uncredited)

Directed by
Robert J. Flaherty 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Frances H. Flaherty  idea (uncredited)
Robert J. Flaherty  uncredited

Produced by
Robert J. Flaherty .... producer
John Révillon .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Rudolf Schramm (1947)
Stanley Silverman (1976)
 
Cinematography by
Robert J. Flaherty (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Herbert Edwards (1947 version)
Robert J. Flaherty (uncredited)
Charles Gelb (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Blachley .... sound (1976 version)
 
Music Department
Miriam Arsham .... music editor (1976 version)
Richard Fitz .... assisting artist: percussion (1976 version)
Ida Kafavian .... violin (1976 version)
Buell Neidlinger .... assisting artist: double bass (1976 version)
Daniel Moses Schreier .... assistant: Mr. Silverman's (1976 version)
Peter Serkin .... piano (1976 version)
Fred Sherry .... musician: cello (1976 version)
Richard Stoltzman .... clarinet (1976 version)
Tashi .... played by (1976 version)
 
Other crew
Willard Van Dyke .... supervisor: International Film Seminars (1976 version)
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
79 min | 65 min (TCM print)
Country:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:G | Canada:G (Manitoba/Nova Scotia/Québec) | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Germany:6 | Portugal:M/6 (DVD rating) | Portugal:17 (original rating) | Spain:T | UK:U (re-release) (1947) | USA:Not Rated | USA:TV-PG (TV rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The failure of the original copyright holder to renew the film's copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second- or third-generation (or more) copies of the film.See more »
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FAQ

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22 out of 26 people found the following review useful.
Powerful and memorable even after 80 years!, 19 March 2002
Author: Eric Bischoff from Seattle

Years ago, in high school, I had to sit through a creaky, dim and dirty, silent black and white documentary about some Eskimo. I remember nothing of the film except that I didn't like it. Today, I had the opportunity to see a recently restored and nicely scored re-release of that film: Nanook of the North. After all the National Geographic, Nova, PBS and Discovery Channel documentaries I have seen over the years chronicling the lives of aboriginal bands of people, (aboriginal people often wearing Coca-Cola T-shirts and baseball caps), this classic 1922 epic is the best I've ever seen showing a happy people working desperately to survive in an incomprehensibly harsh environment. It is quite a compliment to the film and its subject that it retains so much power almost 80 years after it was created. The film simply documents a small group of Inuit and their children in northeast Canada as they struggle to live from day to day. That these people survive at all, let alone remain a seemingly happy, life-loving team in such a place is mind-boggling. So many of the brutally realistic scenes in this wonderful film remind me of how sterilized many contemporary documentaries have become. We see the necessary brutality of finding, stalking and killing your food. Then slicing up your kill right there on the ice and eating it where it died. We witness Nanook harpooning and then `reeling in' a walrus, catching fish with no hook and no real bait and somehow knowing where to dig a tiny hole in the ice. Then, through that tiny hole, he spears and battles to bring in a seal. And he succeeds. But more than the environment and more than the struggle, what keeps us watching this film is character. Nanook is the chief of the small tribe and the father in the main family that is followed. He is smart, curious, inventive, determined and, at the core, a happy, gregarious character that we learn to laugh with, root for and celebrate with as he keeps his family fed. His children are an absolute delight, playful and endearing, seemingly oblivious to the awful world in which they live. The film seems to have no artifice at all and everything seems to be a regular part of their life with little attention paid to the camera. If you are a lover of the documentary form, you cannot miss this re-release. It appears to have been struck from a near pristine negative and restored to its original length of somewhere over 65 minutes. The pleasant score is not too obtrusive and sounds as though it may be a reconstruction of the score composed for the theatrical re-release of the film in 1939, but the credits aren't completely clear on that. See this film.

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