Ben Trego dies defending his twin sons from Indian attack. Separated, the two boys grow up very differently, one as Paul Marsden, the other as a cowboy named Three Word Brand. Paul becomes ... See full summary »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Three Word Brand / Governor Marsden / Ben Trego
Jane Novak ...
Ethel Barton
S.J. Bingham ...
George Barton
J. Gordon Russell ...
Bull Yeates (as Gordon Russell)
George C. Pearce ...
John Murray (as George Pearce)
Collette Forbes ...
Governor's Fiance
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Storyline

Ben Trego dies defending his twin sons from Indian attack. Separated, the two boys grow up very differently, one as Paul Marsden, the other as a cowboy named Three Word Brand. Paul becomes governor of Utah while Brand partners with George Barton in a ranch. The owner of the adjacent ranch plots to get Barton and Brand out of the way in order to control water rights. When Governor Marsden comes to the area to investigate, Brand sees the resemblance between them, though neither knows about his twin. Brand waylays Paul and takes his place as governor in an attempt to thwart the crooked rancher in the water rights scheme. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

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water rights | utah | See All (2) »

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Western

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Release Date:

16 October 1921 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

En Kamp for Livet  »

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(DVD)

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1.33 : 1
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Trivia

Reels 1 and 2 of this film survive at the UCLA Film and Television Archives, in original nitrate form, reels 3 and 4 were discarded for unknown reasons and their catalogue does not state why. See more »

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User Reviews

Three Harts and two heroines, but the Joker wins the plot!
12 August 2011 | by See all my reviews

In addition to Joseph August's attractive location photography and Lambert Hillyer's observant direction, with his scrupulous attention to both the broad and the tiny details (the only item we could fault was the art director's obvious facade for the court house), I'd draw attention to Hillyer's masterful control over the actors. Hart is always on top of his game and never leaves us in doubt as to which of his roles he is playing. Jane Novak makes a most convincing yet attractive heroine while Gordon Russell and Herschel Mayall are villains to the colors born. Oddly, it's none of these – nor even the high-billed yet creditably innocuous S.J. Bingham or the beautifully skillful Collette Forbes – who walk away with the film's acting honors, but George Pearce. Admittedly, he has the most colorful role, but he plays it with the utmost finesse – no doubt helped out by the observant Hillyer. I love the scene in which Pearce is bragging how well he knows every inch of the Trego Valley and the governor, anxious to hire a reliable guide (and who is obviously stunned by the braggart's voracious vocabulary) looks towards the hotelier who is carrying his bags and standing halfway up the stairs. The hotel man keeps a poker face, but nods slightly. Very slightly! Now that's direction! Whoever said Hillyer was a routine Hollywood "B" workman had obviously never seen any of his silent work. Hillyer was one of the most astute yet sensitive directors in the field. And, in my opinion, "Three Word Brand" stands as one of his best films.


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