IMDb > The Idle Class (1921)

The Idle Class (1921) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 8 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
7.5/10   1,800 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Down 11% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writer:
Charles Chaplin (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Idle Class on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
25 September 1921 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A tramp sneaks into a upper class golf resort. The tramp meets a rich woman who is having an argument with her drunken husband. Complications arise when she mistakes the tramp for her husband. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
Distinct Classes See more (16 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Charles Chaplin ... Tramp / Husband (as Charlie Chaplin)

Edna Purviance ... Neglected Wife
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Charles Aber ... Extra (uncredited)
Joe Anderson ... Extra (uncredited)
Laura Anson ... Extra (uncredited)
Walter Bacon ... Extra (uncredited)
Robert Badger ... Extra (uncredited)
George Bastian ... Extra (uncredited)
Gladys Baxter ... Extra (uncredited)
J.A. Beaver ... Extra (uncredited)
Bruce Belamator ... Extra (uncredited)
Harriett Bennett ... Extra (uncredited)
Mary Ann Bennett ... Extra (uncredited)
Henry Bergman ... Sleeping Hobo / Guest in Cop Uniform (uncredited)
Richard Brewster ... Extra (uncredited)
Carl Brown ... Extra (uncredited)
Evelyn Burns ... Extra (uncredited)
Joe Campbell ... Extra (uncredited)
William Carey ... Extra (uncredited)
Helene Caverly ... Extra (uncredited)
Lane Chandler ... Extra (uncredited)
Ethel Childers ... Extra (uncredited)
Jim Collins ... Extra (uncredited)
Marie Crisp ... Extra (uncredited)
Lottie Cruz ... Extra (uncredited)
W.R. Denning ... Extra (uncredited)
Miss Egbert ... Extra (uncredited)
Bertha Feducha ... Extra (uncredited)
Joseph Flores ... Extra (uncredited)
Nell Foltz ... Extra (uncredited)
Ruth Foster ... Extra (uncredited)
Al Ernest Garcia ... Cop in Park / Guest (uncredited)
Miss Grace ... Extra (uncredited)

Lita Grey ... Maid (uncredited)
William Hackett ... Extra (uncredited)
Jules Hanft ... Extra (uncredited)
Art Hanson ... Extra (uncredited)
E.C. Holkin ... Extra (uncredited)
Howard Johnston ... Extra (uncredited)
Harold Kent ... Extra (uncredited)
Duffy Kirk ... Extra (uncredited)
Edward Knoblock ... Guest (uncredited)
Mary Land ... Extra (uncredited)
Mrs. Ross Lang ... Extra (uncredited)
Melissa Ledgerwood ... Extra (uncredited)
Jack Lott ... Extra (uncredited)

Harry Maynard ... Butler (uncredited)
B.W. McComber ... Extra (uncredited)
Clyde McCoy ... Extra (uncredited)
Helen McKee ... Extra (uncredited)
Helen McMullin ... Extra (uncredited)
Lillian McMurray ... Maid (uncredited)
Harold McNulty ... Extra (uncredited)
Charles Meakin ... Extra (uncredited)
Paul Mertz ... Extra (uncredited)
George Milo ... Extra (uncredited)
George Mistler ... Extra (uncredited)
William Moore ... Extra (uncredited)
Jack Mortimer ... Extra (uncredited)
Howard Olsen ... Guest (uncredited)
Bob Palmer ... Extra (uncredited)
Pearl Palmer ... Extra (uncredited)
Lolita Parker ... Guest (uncredited)
Mrs. Parker ... Guest (uncredited)
Miss M. Parsons ... Extra (uncredited)
Gertrude Pedlar ... Extra (uncredited)
R.O. Pennell ... Extra (uncredited)
John Rand ... Golfer / Guest (uncredited)
Granville Redmond ... Guest (uncredited)
Dolly Rich ... Extra (uncredited)
Margaret Rishell ... Extra (uncredited)
Carlyle Robinson ... Guest (uncredited)
Hugh Saxon ... Extra (uncredited)
Anita Simons ... Extra (uncredited)
C.B. Steele ... Extra (uncredited)
Rex Storey ... Pickpocket / Guest (uncredited)
Mack Swain ... Edna's Father (uncredited)
John Sweeny ... Extra (uncredited)
L. Swisher ... Extra (uncredited)
Jack Sydney ... Extra (uncredited)
Jean Temple ... Extra (uncredited)
Harry Tenbrook ... Extra (uncredited)
William H. Thompson ... Extra (uncredited)
Armand Triller ... Extra (uncredited)
California Truman ... Extra (uncredited)
John Underhill ... Extra (uncredited)
Loyal Underwood ... Guest (uncredited)
Joe Van Meter ... Guest (uncredited)
Catherine Vidor ... Extra (uncredited)
Anita Walton ... Extra (uncredited)
Gladys Webb ... Extra (uncredited)
Miss Wicks ... Extra (uncredited)
Vera Wilder ... Extra (uncredited)
Fred L. Wilson ... Extra (uncredited)
Jack Woods ... Extra (uncredited)
Create a character page for: ?

Directed by
Charles Chaplin  (as Charlie Chaplin)
 
Writing credits
Charles Chaplin (written by) (as Charlie Chaplin)

Produced by
Charles Chaplin .... producer (as Charlie Chaplin)
 
Cinematography by
Roland Totheroh (uncredited)
 
Film Editing by
Charles Chaplin (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Charles D. Hall (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Charles Reisner .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Jack Wilson .... second camera operator (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Mother Vinot .... seamstress (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Charles Chaplin .... music composed by: 1971 (as Charlie Chaplin)
Eric James .... music associate: 1971
 
Transportation Department
Toraichi Kono .... driver: Mr. Chaplin (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Nellie Bly Baker .... secretary: Mr. Chaplin (uncredited)
Elsie Codd .... unit publicist (uncredited)
Tom Harrington .... assistant: Mr. Chaplin (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors
Create a character page for: ?

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Vanity Fair" - USA (alternative title)
See more »
Runtime:
32 min | Spain:29 min
Country:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System) (re-issue) | Silent
Certification:
USA:TV-G (TV rating)

Did You Know?

Goofs:
Continuity: When the father-in-law smacks Charlie's doppelganger in their room, the feather falls off his armor helmet. When the father-in-law pulls him out of the room into the hall, the feather is back on the helmet.See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
5 out of 5 people found the following review useful.
Distinct Classes, 4 March 2004
Author: Robert J. Maxwell (rmax304823@yahoo.com) from Deming, New Mexico, USA

The post-war period, until the depression, must have been a class-conscious period in America, with some people very rich and most others (eg., farmers) poor. Charlie is the tramp character so he's poor. The plot is said to have been developed by him after he wandered around the prop room and spotted a bag of golf clubs. The story is certainly simple enough. Chaplain finds himself on a golf course and a series of gags ensue, after which he's chased by a cop and runs into a mansion where a costume party is in progress. He's taken for the host, who is a ringer. The other guests believe that the host's tramp outfit is simply a costume for the party. The real host, meanwhile, is encased in a suit of armor whose visor has dropped and jammed shut so no one can see his face. Charlie gets out of it okay and ends the movie by kicking the security guard in the pants and running away.

To me, the funniest gag, in a movie filled with funny gags, has to do with Charlie as the real host. (He has a double role.) The high-class host is a drunk. In his natty evening dress, but without trousers -- don't ask -- he comes home to find a note from his wife. "I am taking up other quarters until you rid yourself of your drinking habit," says the note. Charlie reads it and slowly turns away from the camera and bends over a table, his shoulders racked with sobs. What remorse! But, no. When he turns again towards the camera we see he is matter-of-factly shaking a cocktail mixer! It's called a "garden path" joke, and it efficiently explodes our expectations.

It's hard to imagine how Chaplin could have found any humor in alcohol use, given his family history. His girl friend at the time, Edna Purviance, was to become bloated from alcohol abuse too.

Well, as I say, though, the story isn't much. It's really two stories: (1) the golf course sequence, and (2) the mixed identities at the costume party. Both of them are good. There's more slapstick in the second part and probably more gag continuity in the first.

I saw this only a few hours ago and I'm still laughing, enough to be compelled to add a description of one more joke. On the golf course, Charlie has hit a ball that lands in the open mouth of a fat man asleep on his back. As the fellow snores, the white ball appears and disappears in his mouth. How does Charlie manage to hit the ball again? He steps on the guy's belly, the ball pops a few feet up in the air, and he hits it in mid air using his golf club like a baseball bat. If the joke loses something in the course of its transposition into print, well, blame it on Charlie's "genius," in the original sense.

It's pretty consistently funny.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (16 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for The Idle Class (1921)

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
Fierce People The Circus A Place in the Sun City Lights Modern Times
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Short section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.