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" The Tornado mostly followed pulp Western formula -- bad guys hold up a town, take a girl hostage... See full synopsis »

Director: John Ford
Stars: John Ford, Jean Hathaway, Peter Gerald
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Sheriff Pete Larkin
...
Lonnie Larkin
Yvette Mitchell ...
Conchita
Jack Woods ...
Ben Crawly
Duke R. Lee ...
Slim
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Storyline

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Plot Keywords:

false accusation | lost film | See All (2) »

Genres:

Short | Western

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Release Date:

1 March 1919 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

His Buddy  »

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1.33 : 1
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Presumed to be lost. See more »

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User Reviews

The Camera as Companion
17 July 2004 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

In this John Ford offering you really get to see the camera as a person keeping the company of the protagonist. It acts as a companion, displaying an intimacy that enables the viewer to discover the story through the unfolding of events. The camera is the star of this film rather than the principal actor, threading its way through the story to identify the key plot points. This is pure cinema in the silent era, and demonstrates shades of 1950s Alfred Hitchcock. I like the way how John Ford stands behind the film to allow the characters to reveal their inner life. He probes their feelings with his camera, and without the hindrance of dialogue we are engaged in the torture of their souls.


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