IMDb > My Lady Margarine (1919)

My Lady Margarine (1919) More at IMDbPro »Die Austernprinzessin (original title)


Overview

User Rating:
6.9/10   882 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Down 9% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Hanns Kräly (writer)
Ernst Lubitsch (writer)
Contact:
View company contact information for My Lady Margarine on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
26 June 1919 (Germany) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
An American heiress seeks the hand of an impoverished German prince. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
User Reviews:
"I wouldn't mind such a wedding every day" See more (13 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)
Victor Janson ... Mister Quaker, oyster-king of America
Ossi Oswalda ... Ossi, his daughter
Harry Liedtke ... Prince Nucki
Julius Falkenstein ... Josef, a friend of Nucki
Max Kronert ... Seligsohn the Matchmaker
Curt Bois ... Conductor (as Kurt Bois)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Hans Junkermann ... (uncredited)
Albert Paulig ... (uncredited)

Directed by
Ernst Lubitsch 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Hanns Kräly  writer
Ernst Lubitsch  writer

Original Music by
William Davies (1992)
 
Cinematography by
Theodor Sparkuhl 
 
Production Design by
Rochus Gliese 
Kurt Richter 
 
Other crew
Kurt Waschneck .... technical director
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Die Austernprinzessin" - Germany (original title)
"The Oyster Princess" - International (English title)
See more »
Runtime:
47 min | 58 min (20 fps) | Spain:60 min (DVD edition)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Movie Connections:

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
2 out of 2 people found the following review useful.
"I wouldn't mind such a wedding every day", 11 January 2010
Author: Steffi_P from Ruritania

The old adage about jokes has it that "It's the way you tell 'em", and this applies to visual gags as well as verbal ones. Almost anything can be funny depending on how you present it. The German comedies of Ernst Lubitsch are like a master class in how to "tell" jokes on the silent screen.

What makes these pictures very different to their American counterparts, is that in Hollywood silent comedies revolved around a star. Germany had no Chaplin, Keaton or Lloyd, but they had a lot of decent comedy supporting players, and they had the brain of Lubitsch. In Lubitsch's best comedies (and this is one of his two or three finest) the humour is all derived from arrangements and exaggeration. He was, in effect, a choreographer of comedy.

We all know about the necessity of comic timing. But comic space is equally important. Lubitsch often makes a joke out of suddenly changing the way we view something. For example, we see from the side-view Nucki and Josef hurriedly tidying their little apartment, and then when they finally allow the matchmaker to enter, we switch to the angle from the doorway, and are suddenly hit with the inventively effective makeshift throne room they have thrown together. But Lubitsch's greatest and most unique moments are the ensemble gags. You see, if Mister Quaker had one servant following him around wiping his nose and carrying his cup of tea, it might be kind of funny. But to have four identically dressed servants trotting after him, each one doing a different menial task, is hilarious. The jewel in the Oyster Princess's crown has to be the "foxtrot epidemic" which is absolutely beautiful in its precise comic construction.

Lubitsch has melded this thing from the most wonderful of components. Writer Hanns Kraly has given him a tight and fast moving plot, ideal for the lightning supply of gags (apparently in their many collaborations Lubitsch would get the basic idea for a story, and Kraly would shape it into something workable). The Oyster Princess is a particularly absurd spin on a well-known theme – a marriage of convenience between nouveau riche and bankrupt aristocracy. There's also a dash of Cinderella thrown in, with Josef's impersonation of Prince Nucki making him the Dandini figure. These are familiar themes, and thus ones easy for Lubitsch to tweak into crazed but affectionate parody.

And the cast, while not quite the attention-holding clowns that formed the centre of Hollywood silent comedy, are all competent at their game and worthy of a chuckle. Harry Liedtke pratfalls nicely and does an amusing drunk act. He has a great face for a comedy lead man; handsome, but with his wide eyes looking perpetually a little sick or worried. Ossi Oswalda was one thing the US didn't have – a young and pretty female comic lead who is actually comical in her own right. The possible exception to this would be Mabel Normand, but even she didn't get stuck into these roles the way Ossi does. Oswalda's spoilt brat act is absolutely priceless. Meanwhile Julius Falkenstein is delightfully playful, and Victor Janson's stone-faced pessimism is almost reminiscent of Keaton.

Pictures like the Oyster Princess may be a far cry from the "sophisticated" bedroom comedies of the 1930s for which Lubitsch is best known, but they have a "Lubitsch touch" of a very different kind, that of the bizarre, the over-the-top; the touch of a unique and inspired comic genius. And who says the Germans have no sense of humour?

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (13 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for My Lady Margarine (1919)

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
The Hangover The Rules of the Game Much Ado About Nothing Penelope The House of Mirth
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
IMDb Comedy section IMDb Germany section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.