Allaine Grandet lives with her father in the barren land of the north, where women are nothing more than mere chattels. She is sold by her father to Jules Latour, a brutal and primitive ... See full summary »

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(as R. William Neill)

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Cast

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Allaine Grandet
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Harley Dane
Melbourne MacDowell ...
James Dermot
William Conklin ...
Jules Latour
Lou Salter ...
Theodore De Coppee
Carmen Phillips ...
Marie Courtot
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Storyline

Allaine Grandet lives with her father in the barren land of the north, where women are nothing more than mere chattels. She is sold by her father to Jules Latour, a brutal and primitive trapper, who subsequently gambles her away to James Dermot, the keeper of a den in the gold settlement. She is here befriended by a besotted pianist, who has seen better days, but whose manhood revives in Allaine's environment. The gambling hall proprietor seeks to bend her to his will, but she resists him, nameless fear tugging at her heartstrings. When he seeks to enforce his will upon her, she shoots and wounds him, and with this act her fear vanishes and she becomes mistress of herself. She goes with the pianist into the snows, and in a drift their dog unearths the body of Latour. So she finds happiness in the love of her protector, whose manhood has restored her faith in him. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama

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29 April 1918 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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A copy of the film is preserved at the Library of Congress. See more »

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The story is sordid, but has possibilities of strong drama
14 November 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Life in the raw is shown in "Tyrant Fear," a five-part Paramount picture written by R. Cecil Smith and directed by R. William Neill under the supervision of Thomas H. Ince. Dorothy Dalton is the star. Much of the action takes place in a Northwest gambling hell and dance hall, and the unlovely side of humanity is shown with stark realism. Primitive passions that are supposed to belong only to the caveman are the foundation of most of the scenes, arid there is the usual rough-and-tumble fight. Men bargain for a woman as if she were a beast of burden, and the woman fights her way out of the mire fate has thrown her into, and drags the man she loves with her. Cowed by the matter-of-fact way in which her father forces her to marry a brute of a trapper and her husband turns her over to the keeper of the dance hall, the woman drifts with the tide until she meets the man who awakens her real nature. The story is sordid, but has possibilities of strong drama. In its present form it does not convince, and its direction is not clean-cut. There is no lack of movement, but the situations are often merely theatric. The Nativity scenes are entirely out of place; the atmosphere of lust that pervades the story is not refined by the introduction of this sacred subject. Dorothy Dalton defines the two phases of Allaine Grandet's character distinctly, and puts real power into her big situations. Thurston Hall as Harley Dane, Melbourne MacDowell as James Dermot, William Conklin as Jules Latour, Lou Salter as Theodore De Coppee, and Carmen Phillips as Marie Courtot make the most of their opportunities. John Stumar, the photographer, has taken a number of striking long shots of winter exteriors. – The Moving Picture World, May 4, 1918


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