Harold has trouble with his father and is ordered out of the house. He then becomes a waiter and pulls off some highly amusing stunts at a swell dinner party. He performs a "Julian Eltinge,... See full summary »

Director:

(as Alf Goulding)
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Cast

Credited cast:
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
William Blaisdell
Sammy Brooks
Lige Conley ...
(as Lige Cromley)
Billy Fay ...
(as B. Fay)
William Gillespie
Helen Gilmore
Marvin Loback
Belle Mitchell
James Parrott
Dorothea Wolbert
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Storyline

Harold has trouble with his father and is ordered out of the house. He then becomes a waiter and pulls off some highly amusing stunts at a swell dinner party. He performs a "Julian Eltinge," and appears as a buxom, blithe and debonair young woman. The comedy woven about the new role is sidesplitting, especially when the "he-hussy" is being wooed by the father of his sweetheart. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Plot Keywords:

one reeler | See All (1) »

Genres:

Short | Comedy

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Details

Country:

Release Date:

5 May 1918 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Lui maître d'hôtel  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

The Transcendental Realm
6 August 2004 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

Harold Lloyd is the outsider looking in in this film. He is a dual citizen of the world that he lives in, but he also transcends his time into the world of the audience. His sense of longing for love and happiness is a universal quality that anyone can relate to from any time period. This enables him to have a relationship with the viewer rather than just performing to them. In a way, he is a stand in for the viewer, a chosen representative that the audience can invest their emotions in. He's quite photogenic, and his comedy draws the audience into the story. Unlike Chaplin, he doesn't seek the approval of his audience, but he does seek the approval of his contemporaries because that is the society that he has graduated into.


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