Guido Capanelli is an adventurer, his good looks and courtly bearing helping him through many successes. He has gained entrance to the best society, incidentally making the acquaintance of ... See full summary »

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Cast

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...
Betty Schade ...
Anna
Wedgwood Nowell ...
Guido Campanelli
Nicholas Dunaew ...
Feodor Strogoff
Dick La Reno ...
Prince Paul Ragusin (as Richard Le Reno)
William Dyer ...
Peter Vlasoff
Yvette Mitchell ...
Anna Vlasoff
J. Edwin Brown ...
Karl (as Jim Brown)
Bill Rathbone ...
A Cripple
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Storyline

Guido Capanelli is an adventurer, his good looks and courtly bearing helping him through many successes. He has gained entrance to the best society, incidentally making the acquaintance of Princess Dione, whose father. Prince Paul Ragosin, is in feeble health. Prince Ragosin has expressed a wish that Princess Dione shall marry Feodor Strogoff, and on his death bed gains the promise from Dione that his wish shall be gratified. Feodor allows Guido Capanelli to be Dione's greatest source of sympathy in the hours of her grief, and in consequence, Guido so ingratiates himself with the Princess that she marries the adventurer, regardless of her pledge. Previous to Prince Ragosin's death Dione became interested in Katerina Vlasoff, a girl who is a street vendor of crude images and daughter of Peter Vlasoff, a drunken beast. When the girl returns home one evening without having made a sale all day Vlasoff sends her into the streets, threatening her with harm if she does not return with money ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama

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12 February 1917 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

There are several points in the story at which plausibility is considerably stretched
2 February 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This latest five-reel Bluebird, "The Reward of the Faithless," is not, like the fabled bluebird, for happiness. It is a heavy dramatic offering whose somber plot depresses while its very dolefulness fascinates and holds the interest captive. Most of the scenes are laid in Russia. Although the photoplay ends as happily as could be expected under the circumstances, there is a tragic strain that can be heard above the final song of great happiness. The picture convincingly proves the tradition of the family of one of the characters to the effect that great happiness can come to a member of that family only through great sorrow, and we see most of the sorrow, but little of the happiness. The story has the saving grace of a degree of originality, and was written by Magnus Ingleton. Wedgewood Nowell and Betty Schade head an excellent cast. Upon these two and Claire Du Bray falls work that brings into being their every iota of dramatic ability, and they never once fail a situation, some of which are quite difficult of interpretation. A good characterization is done by William J. Dyer. Nicholas Dunaew proves himself adequate, as does also Richard Le Reno. The picture has received careful and artistic production by Rex Ingram, some of the lightings being especially effective. Photography throughout is excellent. There are several points in the story at which plausibility is considerably stretched. For instance, the adventurer's wife apparently dies when the man and the one-time woman of the streets, who has been taken into the home, fail to give her prescribed pills. We see the wife in her shroud, and believe her to be dead. But she isn't. She comes out of her comatose trance when her first lover mourns at her side. – The Moving Picture World, February 10, 1917


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