6.9/10
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16 user 12 critic

The Poor Little Rich Girl (1917)

Gwen's family is rich, but her parents ignore her and most of the servants push her around, so she is lonely and unhappy. Her father is concerned only with making money, and her mother ... See full summary »

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(play), (scenario)
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1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Madlaine Traverse ...
Gwendolyn's Mother
Charles Wellesley ...
Gwendolyn's Father
Gladys Fairbanks ...
Jane
...
The Plumber
Emile La Croix ...
The Organ Grinder
Marcia Harris ...
Miss Royale
Charles Craig ...
Thomas
Frank Andrews ...
Potter
...
The Doctor
George Gernon ...
Johnny Blake
Maxine Elliott Hicks ...
Susie May Squoggs (as Maxine Hicks)
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Storyline

Gwen's family is rich, but her parents ignore her and most of the servants push her around, so she is lonely and unhappy. Her father is concerned only with making money, and her mother cares only about her social position. But one day a servant's irresponsibility creates a crisis that causes everyone to rethink what is important to them. Written by Snow Leopard

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5 March 1917 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Rapariguinha Pobre  »

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| (TCM print) | (TCM print)

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mary Pickford was 25 years old when she played the 11 year old Gwen in this movie. Her short stature helped the illusion of youth. See more »

Quotes

Title card: So they punished the poor little rich girl, for wanting to be a free little poor girl.
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Connections

Featured in Mary Pickford: The Muse of the Movies (2008) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Putting in images the delirium of a seriously ill little girl
15 December 2013 | by (Europe) – See all my reviews

The most original aspect of this film is that it translates into images the delirium of a seriously ill little girl fighting for her life. The beginning of the film is quite conventional both as regards the story, a little girl is ignored by her rich parents and bullied by the servants, and the way of filming, mostly indoor long duration wide shots with fixed camera, with some medium shots and a few close-ups. There are some slapstick gags and a funny scene when the father, remembering that, as a child, he had been dressed as a girl to punish him, decides to dress Gwen as a boy. Far from considering this as a punishment, she enjoys her boy costume and has a lot of fun having a mud fight with street boys.

The film becomes more interesting in the second half when it veers towards surrealism. It shows what Gwen is imagining, taking literally expressions that she hears, e.g. her father fighting bears, and the servants looking like their nicknames, snake in grass, double-face or big ears. It also shows the father, who has big financial worries, visualising his double taking a gun to commit suicide, with Gwen overlooking the scene.

a-cinema-history.blogspot.com/2013/12/


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