IMDb > Joan the Woman (1916)
Joan the Woman
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Joan the Woman (1916) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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6.2/10   281 votes »
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Release Date:
25 December 1916 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Based on the life of the immortal Joan of Arc
Plot:
A WWI English officer is inspired the night before a dangerous mission by a vision of Joan of Arc, whose story he relives. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
(2 articles)
Top Movies of the Teens
 (From Alt Film Guide. 26 March 2013, 7:33 PM, PDT)

Madonna's W.E. Reviews: Movie Lambasted at Venice Film Festival
 (From Alt Film Guide. 1 September 2011, 12:11 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
Geraldine Farrar, Some Memorable Visuals, & More See more (16 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Geraldine Farrar ... Jeanne d'Arc (Joan of Arc)
Raymond Hatton ... Charles VII
Hobart Bosworth ... Gen. La Hire
Theodore Roberts ... Cauchon

Wallace Reid ... Eric Trent 1431 / Eric Trent 1917
Charles Clary ... La Tremouille
James Neill ... Laxart
Tully Marshall ... L'Oiseleur
Lawrence Peyton ... Gaspard
Horace B. Carpenter ... Jacques d'Arc
Cleo Ridgely ... The king's favorite
Lillian Leighton ... Isambeau

Marjorie Daw ... Katherine
Ernest Joy ... Robert de Beaudricourt
John Oaker ... Jean de Metz
Hugo B. Koch ... Duke of Burgundy
William Conklin ... John of Luxembourg
Walter Long ... The executioner
William Elmer ... Guy Townes (as Billy Elmer)
Emilius Jorgensen ... Michael

Donald Crisp
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Jack Hoxie (as Hart Hoxie)
Lucien Littlefield

Ramon Novarro ... Starving Peasant (as Ramon Samaniegos)
Nigel De Brulier ... Man at trial (uncredited)

Jack Holt ... (uncredited)
Fred Kohler ... L'Oiseleur's henchman (uncredited)
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Directed by
Cecil B. DeMille 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
William C. de Mille 
Jeanie Macpherson  scenario

Produced by
Cecil B. DeMille .... producer
 
Original Music by
William Furst 
 
Cinematography by
Alvin Wyckoff 
 
Film Editing by
Cecil B. DeMille 
 
Art Direction by
Wilfred Buckland 
 
Stunts
Pansy Perry .... stunt double: Geraldine Farrar (uncredited)
 

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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
Germany:100 min | Germany:138 min (2003) | USA:138 min
Country:
Color:
Color (Handschiegel Color) | Black and White
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
First film to use the Handschiegl Color Process.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Trent discovers the sword, he holds the hilt in his right hand. In the insert close-up the hilt is in his left hand. In the cutback, it has returned to the right. (In fact, the insert shot has been spliced in upside-down.)See more »
Quotes:
Jeanne d'Arc:Englishman, there is room in each heart but for one love - mine is for France!See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Vraie Jeanne, fausse Jeanne (2008) (TV)See more »

FAQ

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8 out of 10 people found the following review useful.
Geraldine Farrar, Some Memorable Visuals, & More, 20 December 2004
Author: Snow Leopard from Ohio

Geraldine Farrar's performance as Joan of Arc, along with some memorable visual sequences, are the main reasons why "Joan the Woman" is still worth seeing today, despite the availability of many other movies about the celebrated French heroine. Although Farrar is not as remarkable as Maria Falconetti was 11 years later (which is by no means a criticism of Farrar - no one else has come close to Falconetti in the role of Joan, and most probably no one will for many years to come), she is very good, especially given the limitations of the time.

Except for clearly being older than the historical Joan was, Farrar conveys pretty well the most important characteristics of the heroine. She and DeMille did well to avoid making her too feminine, instead making her a strong and interesting leader with a limited but heartfelt set of priorities. The story does include some rather fanciful DeMille touches, but as cinema they work well enough, even if on a handful of occasions they may seem out of place in Joan's story. The screenplay also gives Farrar a chance to show many different sides of her character.

Some of the large-scale sequences are also nicely done for an era in which film-makers usually had to work out by themselves how to film such scenes, with only a handful of previous examples to go by. While some of the seams might show now, they did a very good job with what was available, and they must have looked rather impressive in their day.

Raymond Hatton performs well enough in the rather thankless role of the weak king Charles, and Theodore Roberts has some good villainous moments as Cauchon. Some of the other characters, while satisfactory, are a bit too non-descript to be a fully effective complement to Joan.

The one real weakness of the movie is the now-extraneous sequence set in the World War that was in progress when the film was made. It's not bad in itself, and contemporary audiences might have found it worthwhile, but the story of Joan of Arc is really powerful enough that it should be allowed to stand on its own.

Overall, "Joan the Woman" is a good to very good movie in just about every respect, and it is still among the better Joan of Arc films. Perhaps the only one that is clearly superior is the amazing 1928 Dreyer/Falconetti masterpiece "The Passion of Joan of Arc". Since there are a number of sound movies about Joan available, this one unfortunately may not get much attention anymore, but for those who still enjoy the silents, it's worth seeing.

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