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The Face in the Moonlight (1915)

During the latter part of the reign of Louis XVIII, in France, Ambrose, an aristocrat, loves Jeanne Mailloche, a peasant girl, but is compelled to marry his cousin, Alice de Fontelles, to ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Victor / Rabat
Stella Archer ...
Lucille
H. Cooper Cliffe ...
Munier
...
Ambrose
Dorothy Fairchild ...
Jeanne Mailloche
George MacIntyre ...
(as George D. MacIntyre)
...
(unconfirmed)
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Storyline

During the latter part of the reign of Louis XVIII, in France, Ambrose, an aristocrat, loves Jeanne Mailloche, a peasant girl, but is compelled to marry his cousin, Alice de Fontelles, to preserve their respective estates. Jeanne dies soon after, leaving a son, who is kidnapped and raised by a band of ruffians. Alice's son, receiving every advantage, is raised as an aristocrat. Twenty years later, at the time Napoleon was in exile, the young aristocrat, Victor by name, becomes a captain in the King's army. His half-brother, Rabat, son of Jeanne, has degenerated into a criminal, with a price on his head. Strangely enough, they look exactly alike, though neither knows of the whereabouts of the other. In fact, Rabat is ignorant of Victor's existence. The young Captain is told of Rabat's existence by his father when the latter is on his death bed. Victor is engaged to Lucille, the niece of Munier, who is Victor's father's secretary. Munier becomes associated with the conspirators, who are... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | History

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28 June 1915 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Um Drama Sob o Império  »

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1.33 : 1
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