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The Squaw Man (1914) Poster

(1914)

Trivia

Cecil B. DeMille's ledger noted that he hired an extra named Hal Roach for $5 per day, and rejected actress Jane Darwell, who was already commanding $60 per week.
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The site where most of the interior scenes were filmed, on the corner of Sunset and Vine in Hollywood, is now occupied by a Chase bank. The building was originally designed as a Home Savings bank in the 1950s by Millard Sheets Studio (one of nearly 100 in the Los Angeles area designed by the firm). A mural on one interior wall, by Sheets, commemorates the production by depicting four scenes from the film.
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The first film made by (and involving) Cecil B. DeMille.
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The Motion Picture Patents Trust, headed by Thomas A. Edison, was at that time engaged in an attempt to control all motion picture production in the U.S., and went to great lengths - often including destruction of property and physical violence - to do so. The Trust was based on the East Coast, which is why many independent producers, such as Cecil B. DeMille, began shooting their films in California. The Trust's intimidation tactics probably explain why DeMille - who was one of their most vocal opponents - put no cast or crew credits on this film.
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Several one-act versions of the play were produced as early as 1904. The complete play opened on Broadway in New York City, New York, USA on 23 October 1905 and closed about 1 April 1906 after 222 performances. The opening night cast included George Fawcett, William S. Hart, William Faversham , Theodore Roberts, Adrienne Morrison (billed as Mabel Morrison), Selene Johnson, Mitchell Lewis and Cecil Ward.
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The musical composition "Nat-u-ritch: An Indian idyll. Intermezzo from The Squaw Man" by Theodore Bendix was published to promote the picture.
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Interiors were filmed on an open-air soundstage, built off of a barn. The L-shaped barn was built in 1901 and stood on the corner of Selma and Vine Streets in Hollywood. The stage was connected to one wing of the barn which was destroyed by a nitrate fire in 1918. The main portion of the barn has survived and now stands across the street from the entrance to the Hollywood Bowl. The barn serves as the home of the Hollywood Heritage museum.
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The original studio facilities for Paramount Pictures grew out of the barn on the corner of Selma and Vine streets. When Paramount moved to its current site in 1926 (further east, off of Melrose Avenue), they brought the barn with them.
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Film debut of Raymond Hatton.
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Commonly accepted as the first feature length film to be made in Hollywood, California. Short films such as In Old California (1910) has previously been made in the neighborhood.
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According to 'William C. DeMille', his brother 'Cecil B. DeMille', had initially no interest in motion picture production, and William had to convince him to undertake work on this film.
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In order to secure the services of stage star Dustin Farnum, director Cecil B. DeMille offered him a quarter interest in the new Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company in lieu of salary. Farnum declined the offer and was salaried at $250 per week, good money for 1913. The Lasky Company later merged with Adolph Zukor's Famous Players, Bosworth Pictures, and the Pallas/Morosco Company to form Paramount Pictures. Farnum's decision netted him $5000 but ultimately cost him millions.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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