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The Stolen Moccasins (1913)

Harden, a typical border tough, professes love for Belle: but she heroically repulses him in a way that infuriates. Jack, her sweetheart, hears of this and he tells Harden to "vamoose." ... See full summary »

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(scenario), (story)
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Cast

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Jack
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Belle
Lester Cuneo ...
Harden
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Swift Foot
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Storyline

Harden, a typical border tough, professes love for Belle: but she heroically repulses him in a way that infuriates. Jack, her sweetheart, hears of this and he tells Harden to "vamoose." Harden, with several choice spirits, after "irrigating" freely, goes to an Indian camp and steals several pairs of moccasins. They then, soft-footed, go to the cabin of Belle's father and in his absence carry away the girl. Jack is not slow in learning of her disappearance. He inquires of the Indians about her, but they deny knowledge other than of their own losses at the hands of Harden. Swift-Foot, a trailer, offers his services, and they trail the trio to a lonely cabin. Harden and his confederates put up a desperate defense, but Jack and his crowd outclass them as gun-men. The girl is rescued, and Harden, much the worse for wear, is taken back to the settlement to "get his." Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Western

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Release Date:

7 August 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

Not original, doesn't drag
28 October 2017 | by See all my reviews

A typical Western offering by William Duncan and his usual company. The heroine (Myrtle Stedman) refuses the villain (Lester Cuneo) who steals three moccasins from an Indian (Tom Mix). With two pals he abducts the girl and sets fire to the cabin (accidentally). The foot-tracks are seen and the Indians accused by the hero (William Duncan), but they prove themselves guiltless by finding the culprits and helping the hero save the girl. The cabin burns in a lively way and the action, not original, doesn't drag. It is clearly photographed in most scenes. - The Moving Picture World, August 23, 1913


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