Charles, the favorite son of Count Moor is in love with Amelia, his father's niece and ward. Charles's brother Francis, a sly, jealous man, hates him. As a consequence of a drunken brawl, ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Count Moor
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Charles Moor - the Count's Son
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Francis Moor - the Count's Son
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Amelia
Harry Kendall ...
Herman - a Young Nobleman
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Switzer - a Student
Edward Mack ...
The Money Lender
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The College Professor
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Storyline

Charles, the favorite son of Count Moor is in love with Amelia, his father's niece and ward. Charles's brother Francis, a sly, jealous man, hates him. As a consequence of a drunken brawl, Charles is expelled from the University at Leipsic. He then writes an appealing letter, to his father and retires to Weingart in Bohemia to await the count's forgiveness. Francis intercepts his brother's letter and replaces it with another of his own composition to which he forges Charles's signature. The Count makes Francis his sole heir. To the penitent Charles in Bohemia, the news of his father's decision comes. Careless of consequences, he readily assents to the plan of his companions to form a band of robbers with himself as captain. Francis, with the aid of Herman, an enemy of his brother's, make the old Count believe that Charles has been killed in battle, and he falls apparently lifeless at the terrible news. But, as he is being interred, Francis discovers that his father is not dead. However... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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2 August 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

It is no better than that of the day's average offering
20 October 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A picture of the famous play written by Schiller in extreme youth; there is no need to comment on its scenario at this time, except that it is no better than that of the day's average offering. The adapter has done his work commendably, except matters might have been one or two more subfiles. The costumes are accurate and the staging, though rather Italian than German, is sumptuous. The chief value of it, as an offering, comes from the fact that it is a picture of a classical play, seldom or never seen now, but often talked of and lectured on. The Edison Company has done a service in making this particular film and the exhibitor should profit by showing it. The direction was by Walter Edwin. The acting is of fair quality. - The Moving Picture World, August 16, 1913


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