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Arthur James, a young artist from the north, goes south to the home of J.W. Hawkins, a southern planter, to paint a portrait of the former's wife. James is treated hospitably by the planter... See full summary »

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Arthur James
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Grace Hawkins
Bartley McCullum ...
J.W. Hawkins
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The Hawkins Child
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Arthur James, a young artist from the north, goes south to the home of J.W. Hawkins, a southern planter, to paint a portrait of the former's wife. James is treated hospitably by the planter and made to feel perfectly at home. After a few days, Hawkins goes away on a business trip, leaving the young painter to begin the portrait. James is delighted with the beauty of the place and with Grace. She is much younger than her husband, and for the first time in her life is enjoying the companionship of a man her own age. The portrait is begun in the attic, which is the only place where James can find the proper light. An old-fashioned dress, with a low neck bodice, is unearthed from an old trunk, and Grace daily puts it on for the sitting. Their constant companionship results in their falling in love without either of them realizing it. On the planter's return he asks to see the portrait. His anger is aroused by the low neck dress and by a new look that he sees in his wife's eyes and he ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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21 February 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The first half of the film was not interesting
31 July 2017 | by See all my reviews

An artist is summoned by a husband to paint a portrait of his wife. The husband then goes away, leaving his young wife at home; also in the house is the young artist. The first half or three quarters of the film was not interesting. Things brighten up a bit on the return of the husband, who is well worth watching. There is between the wife and the artist a growing affection and a contest between love and honor. Honor gets the decision, but seems to have a hard job winning out. - The Moving Picture World, March 8, 1913


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