Colonel Yancey, C.S.A., his cause lost, rather than surrender his sword, abandons his plantation, takes with him his little girl and the flag he could not save from defeat, and, still ... See full summary »

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(as Emmett Campbell Hall)
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Cast

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Colonel Yancey
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Colonel Winston (as William T. Santschi)
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Louise Yancey (as an adult)
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Louise Yancey (as a child)
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Dick Winston
Roy Watson ...
Secretary to the Consul
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Storyline

Colonel Yancey, C.S.A., his cause lost, rather than surrender his sword, abandons his plantation, takes with him his little girl and the flag he could not save from defeat, and, still wearing his uniform of gray, goes to Honduras. Here the Stars and Bars fly defiantly over Colonel Yancey's house. Louise grows to a beautiful young womanhood, and the old Colonel dreams, bitterly but proudly of the past. Colonel Winston. U.S.A., got into such a habit of wearing his blue uniform during four hard years that he never abandoned it. When appointed Consul of the United States at Tegucigalpa, he secretly thought that it would add no little to his dignity, and so it came about that one day a Union and a Confederate Colonel in full uniform met upon the street, stared, and glared, while from nearby poles floated the Stars and Stripes and the St. Andrew's Cross. Dick Winston, who served as clerk in the Consulate, thought the warlike attitudes assumed by the old gentlemen very amusing, until he met ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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30 May 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

Has too many unconvincing smaller things to be called a big picture
25 November 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A picture that opens, as far as its action is concerned, with a few war scenes just after Lee's surrender. The hero, a C.S.A. colonel (Hobart Bosworth), refuses to take the oath of fealty to the Union, and, with his little daughter, escapes to a strange country where he raises the Stars and Bars and lives an exile. The picture's object is to work up, with increasing patriotic fervor, to a climax in which the Stars and Stripes can be shown gladly waving on the staff above the reconstructed colonel's house. To accomplish this, a United States consul with his son are introduced, and a love match made between the colonel's daughter and the young man. The fervor is created by making the inhabitants hate the Americans, by a riot, in which the flag is dishonored, by making the fiery colonel leap into the breech for the flag that once had been his, and finally by bringing a great United States dreadnought across the sea, and by having the white uniformed tars save not only the Stars and Stripes, but the Stars and Bars, too. The colonel was won by love, and himself hoisted the Stars and Stripes. The picture gets over, but it has too many unconvincing smaller things to be called a big picture. The camera work is only so-so. Because of its quality, it will be liked. It was applauded on Broadway. - The Moving Picture World, June 15, 1912


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