"Love me, love my dog," does not appeal to Billy Hallock. He is very jealous of his wife's attentions to her dog "Jean." Florence Hart and Dick Green, a couple of young friends who are ... See full summary »

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Florence Hart
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Dick Green
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Billy Hallock
Edith Halleran ...
Sue Hallock - Billy's Wife
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Jean, Billy's Dog
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Storyline

"Love me, love my dog," does not appeal to Billy Hallock. He is very jealous of his wife's attentions to her dog "Jean." Florence Hart and Dick Green, a couple of young friends who are engaged to be married, call on Billy and Sue Hallock, and during this visit, they call Billy's attention in a casual way to his wife's fondness for "Jean." Shortly after this incident, Billy and Sue, having engaged seats for the theater, are about to take their departure, when the maid is unexpectedly called away and Mrs. Hallock refuses to go out and leave her dog alone. This convinces Billy that she cares more for her dog than she does for him, and he informs her that it is time for them to separate. He leaves her. Some months later, "Jean," who notices the lonesomeness of his mistress and the different atmosphere of the home, grows very restless and seems to grasp the cause of it all. During the separation of Billy and Sue, "Jean" has occasionally met Mr. Hallock, and she formulates a plan to ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Comedy | Drama

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23 January 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Shows Jean as exhibiting human traits of sympathy and intelligence that the spectator cannot accept
13 August 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Jean is the Vitagraph black and white collie and those who watch the pictures closely will remember that a few months back Jean was pictured as coming between two lovers. That picture was much more believable. This picture shows Jean as exhibiting human traits of sympathy and intelligence that the spectator cannot accept. Miss Turner and Hal Reid play the leading parts as the two lovers who quarrel over Jean, the lover being somewhat jealous of the collie, and whom Jean in the end brings together again. Miss Edith Halleran and Wallace Reid play important roles as a married couple, friends of the lovers. Miss Turner's acting, and as far as that goes the acting of all the principals, gives more than one pretty moment to the picture, which, however, doesn't afford her any real freedom. It is not shown to fair advantage. The plot, the story itself and even the backgrounds, which appear disjointed, keep the picture from rising very much above commonplace. The camera work is fair; it is of full length. A filler. - The Moving Picture World, February 3, 1912


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